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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Love means never having to say you're sorry about anything you do during wartime. That might as well be the slogan of writer-director Anthony Minghella's fancy anti-war romantic spectacles, The English Patient (1996) and its spiritual prequel, the far less accomplished and even less plausible Civil War epic Cold Mountain. Minghella can be a genius when he directs his own original screenplays, like Truly Madly Deeply (1991), the thinking and feeling man's Ghost. As an adapter he has a glass jaw and a tin ear. "Maybe you can't see my face," says Minghella's typically scarred hero, played this time by Jude Law, not The English Patient's Ralph Fiennes.
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December 9, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Jude Law (above, with Nicole Kidman) returns from the Civil War in Cold Mountain (9 p.m.-11:40 p.m., Starz).
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
WAYNESVILLE, N.C. - The real Cold Mountain rises 6,030 feet above sea level here in western North Carolina, a rugged peak clad in mountain laurel and huckleberries and, in winter, towering, leafless trees. Its Hollywood double is in Romania. The movie Cold Mountain opens nationwide today amid critical acclaim and high hopes from a studio that gambled more than $80 million on the production. Set mainly in the Blue Ridge Mountains of the 1860s but filmed in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania, Cold Mountain recounts the pilgrimage of a wounded Confederate deserter who slogs across North Carolina toward the promise of a lover waiting in the hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2004
Last week's question Which movie do you think will win the most Golden Globes? 40.4 percent The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (38 votes) 31.9 percent I don't care (30 votes) 9.6 percent Cold Mountain (9 votes) 5.3 percent Lost in Translation (5 votes) 5.3 percent Mystic River (5 votes) 5.3 percent What are the Golden Globes? (5 votes) 1.1 percent Monster (1 vote) 1.1 percent Other (1 vote) 94 total votes This week's question Who do you think will win Survivor: All-Stars?
FEATURES
By John Bordsen and John Bordsen,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 8, 1998
The hottest novel in America has been the heart-warming "Cold Mountain."The best-selling debut effort by Charles Frazier of Raleigh, N.C., has a prestigious pedigree. "Cold Mountain," in many ways, is "The Odyssey" with collards and tintypes -- a tale of love overcoming separation set in North Carolina late in the Civil War.On one hand, "Cold Mountain" is the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate who decides enough blood (including his own) has been shed; he deserts and tries to return home to the wild uplands of Haywood County.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
The battle over the Confederate Battle Flag goes on. The latest skirmish is taking place at Oxford, Miss., where the football coach of Ole Miss asked students and alumni to stop waving the flag at football games. It offends many people, he said, and it also makes it difficult to recruit black football players.Many blacks and not a few whites hate the flag. They say it is a symbol of the slavery the Confederate States of America were created to defend and perpetuate. Many of those critics seem unaware that the men who fought, suffered, died under that flag were fighting for many reasons.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Arts Writer | December 17, 2003
Eight days before it is scheduled to open in movie theaters, the Civil War epic Cold Mountain already is generating Oscar hype. Set in North Carolina and Virginia, the movie tells the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate soldier who takes a long journey on foot through the Blue Ridge mountains to return to the woman he loves. He dodges Yankee soldiers and his own troops, who are shooting deserters. The film, which is based on the National Book Award-winning novel by Charles Frazier, stars Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger.
FEATURES
December 9, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Jude Law (above, with Nicole Kidman) returns from the Civil War in Cold Mountain (9 p.m.-11:40 p.m., Starz).
NEWS
August 16, 2001
An interview with Stanley Rodbell, a member of S.W.I.M. book club. How did your club get started? Ours is a rather informal book club that really didn't start as a book club, but a gathering of friends. There are ... seven women and five men. The name [what S.W.I.M. stands for] is of interest and debatable. The "Suffering Women" we all kind of agree on, and then maybe "Insufferable Men" or "Insignificant Men" because we were struck by how many of the books we read all have that theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2003
This week's question: What are you most looking forward to doing before the holidays? Cooking Having parties Nothing Relaxing Shopping Taking a vacation There's nothing to look forward to until January Last week's question Which movie do you think will fare best at the Oscars? 5.3 percent Cold Mountain (2 votes) 0 percent The Human Stain (0 votes) 0 percent The Last Samurai (0 votes) 7.9 percent Master and Commander (3 votes) 18.4 percent Mystic River (7 votes) 68.4 percent The Return of the King (26 votes)
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2004
When Charles Frazier's epic novel Cold Mountain came out in 1997, it found two passionate readers in the world of American traditional music. Multi-instrumentalist Tim O'Brien, long known as a leading light in bluegrass and American-Celtic music, and Dirk Powell, a well-known Appalachian fiddler, composer and session man, found the journey of the main character, a wounded Confederate soldier making his way home during the Civil War, as moving as any...
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
WAYNESVILLE, N.C. - The real Cold Mountain rises 6,030 feet above sea level here in western North Carolina, a rugged peak clad in mountain laurel and huckleberries and, in winter, towering, leafless trees. Its Hollywood double is in Romania. The movie Cold Mountain opens nationwide today amid critical acclaim and high hopes from a studio that gambled more than $80 million on the production. Set mainly in the Blue Ridge Mountains of the 1860s but filmed in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania, Cold Mountain recounts the pilgrimage of a wounded Confederate deserter who slogs across North Carolina toward the promise of a lover waiting in the hills.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Love means never having to say you're sorry about anything you do during wartime. That might as well be the slogan of writer-director Anthony Minghella's fancy anti-war romantic spectacles, The English Patient (1996) and its spiritual prequel, the far less accomplished and even less plausible Civil War epic Cold Mountain. Minghella can be a genius when he directs his own original screenplays, like Truly Madly Deeply (1991), the thinking and feeling man's Ghost. As an adapter he has a glass jaw and a tin ear. "Maybe you can't see my face," says Minghella's typically scarred hero, played this time by Jude Law, not The English Patient's Ralph Fiennes.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Arts Writer | December 17, 2003
Eight days before it is scheduled to open in movie theaters, the Civil War epic Cold Mountain already is generating Oscar hype. Set in North Carolina and Virginia, the movie tells the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate soldier who takes a long journey on foot through the Blue Ridge mountains to return to the woman he loves. He dodges Yankee soldiers and his own troops, who are shooting deserters. The film, which is based on the National Book Award-winning novel by Charles Frazier, stars Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger.
NEWS
October 9, 2003
An interview with Linda Williamson, a discussion leader for the Miller Midday Book Club. Why did you start this particular club? Our library wanted to make a daytime book club available to the community. A lot of senior citizens in this neighborhood are avid readers and wanted to participate in a book discussion. Another participant said that there weren't any openings anywhere in other clubs she knew of, so she was glad to come to this one. We were also looking for parents who might drop their kindergartners off at school and want to come in, or people who might want to come on their lunch hour.
NEWS
August 29, 2001
FIRST IT WAS cows. Now it's books. What it's about is the kind of civic undertaking that Chicago is becoming known for (even when it's not the first, just the largest) and that others find worth copying. According to the New York Times, Chicago officials are asking every adolescent and adult to read To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee's novel about racism, between now and Oct. 14. Discussions and other events will be held around the city -- at libraries, bookstores, community centers.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 1, 1997
ASHEVILLE, N.C. -- The story of ''Cold Mountain's'' success -- it is currently the best-selling work of fiction -- speaks well of the nation's literary taste and the publishers, reviewers and booksellers who shape and serve it. This is a story like the one the novel tells, one of regional and local particularities, with national resonance.Charles Frazier, 46, toiled on this, his first novel, for six years. He lives near Raleigh, where he and his wife raise horses and a daughter. His novel takes readers on a long, eventful, sometimes harrowing walk from a Confederate hospital in Raleigh to the mountain late in 1864.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
An interview with Stanley Rodbell, a member of S.W.I.M. book club. How did your club get started? Ours is a rather informal book club that really didn't start as a book club, but a gathering of friends. There are ... seven women and five men. The name [what S.W.I.M. stands for] is of interest and debatable. The "Suffering Women" we all kind of agree on, and then maybe "Insufferable Men" or "Insignificant Men" because we were struck by how many of the books we read all have that theme.
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