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By Tom Linthicum and By Tom Linthicum,Sun Staff | June 11, 2000
"Not War But Murder: Cold Harbor 1864," by Ernest B. Furgurson. Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pages. $27.50. For his third contribution to Civil War nonfiction literature, Ernest B. Furgurson has chosen to focus on a dusty country crossroads 9.9 miles northeast of Richmond where, on June 3, 1864, the entrenched Confederate army of Robert E. Lee repulsed head-on attacks of Ulysses S. Grant's Union troops with staggering loss of life. Cold Harbor is often treated by historians as a bloody bump in the road during Grant's sledge-hammer and flanking campaign that resulted in his bottling up Lee's army in Petersburg and, ultimately, leading to Lee's surrender the following April.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Some people read military history for the technical details--why General X failed to match Hanibal's pincer movement at Cannae. Others, like me, dip into it to see how individuals and societies respond to circumstances of immense stress. Victor Davis Hanson explores these larger dimensions of wars in The Savior Generals (Bloomsbury Press, 305 pages, $28). He takes five commanders from classical antiquity to today to explore how they went into losing wars and salvaged the situation.
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NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,Sun Staff | September 12, 1999
The 2nd Maryland Infantry Battalion was organized at Winchester, Va., in the fall of 1862, of companies recruited in Richmond, Va., by officers of the old 1st Maryland Regiment and some Marylanders who had come to Virginia after the battle of Antietam.The 2nd Maryland was employed during the winter and spring of 1863 at New Market, Harrisonburg and various other points along the Valley Pike.In June 1863, when Gen. Robert E. Lee commenced his move on Pennsylvania, the 2nd Maryland fought at Winchester and then at Culp's Hill during the battle at Gettysburg.
FEATURES
By Tess Russell and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Filmmaker Tom Brandau was 20 when his father committed suicide in Ocean City. More than two decades later, that terrible event has been transformed into the dramatic center of Brandau's first feature-length film, Cold Harbor. Even while struggling to make sense of his father's death, Brandau realized that his loss might also have the potential to inspire. "It would have been different if I wasn't a filmmaker to begin with, but I was a filmmaker," says Brandau, who teaches film classes at Towson University.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 1997
COLD HARBOR, Va. - The Union charge came with the first rays of dawn, 60,000 men swallowing their terror and scrambling into a wall of gunfire that one survivor compared to "volcanic blast."Within nine minutes, 7,000 men fell dead or wounded.That afternoon, Union commander Ulysses S. Grant cabled the War Department, "Our loss was not severe, nor do I suppose our enemy lost heavily."Grant never updated his telegram of June 3, 1864, and the War Department, citing its own sources, continued to minimize Union casualties.
NEWS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 1999
Thousands of Civil War re-enactors will gather at Brandy Station, Va., next weekend to commemorate the 135th anniversary of the 1864 Virginia campaign, which marked the beginning of the end for the Confederacy -- the point at which Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant took command of all the Union forces and determined to crush the South by destroying its armies, especially the Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. Robert E. Lee.The re-enactment features a "Grant vs....
FEATURES
By Tess Russell and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Filmmaker Tom Brandau was 20 when his father committed suicide in Ocean City. More than two decades later, that terrible event has been transformed into the dramatic center of Brandau's first feature-length film, Cold Harbor. Even while struggling to make sense of his father's death, Brandau realized that his loss might also have the potential to inspire. "It would have been different if I wasn't a filmmaker to begin with, but I was a filmmaker," says Brandau, who teaches film classes at Towson University.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | September 30, 1990
KEN BURNS' superb Civil, War series on public television reminded us how lucky we were not to have fought in that war - but how doubly lucky we are that our great-grandfathers did, and that everything came out the way it did. Today those epic battles are being refought in courthouses and, zoning commissions, and this time history is too often the loser.Last week in Culpeper County, Va., they reached a decision in the second battle of Brandy Station. This time, the good side lost. A few miles down the road in Hanover County, they are still fighting the second battle of Cold Harbor, and so far the bulldozers are ahead.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Some people read military history for the technical details--why General X failed to match Hanibal's pincer movement at Cannae. Others, like me, dip into it to see how individuals and societies respond to circumstances of immense stress. Victor Davis Hanson explores these larger dimensions of wars in The Savior Generals (Bloomsbury Press, 305 pages, $28). He takes five commanders from classical antiquity to today to explore how they went into losing wars and salvaged the situation.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
On August 14, 2003, ROBERT GILMOR, 94 at Rosenthal Hospice, Stamford, CT, formerly of Oyster Bay, NY. Former Partner and officer of Paine, Webber, Jackson and Curtis. Born on December 2, 1908 to Robert and Mary Olina Maxwell Gilmor. He was the husband of the late Elizabeth Robert Gilmor and the late Elizabeth Kavanagh Gilmor; loving father of the late Robert Gilmor, Jr., his daughter, Elizabeth Shaw Wills, son, William Gavin Gilmor; step-daughter, Elizabeth Alker Meyer; beloved grandfather of Elizabeth Conlin, Robert Gilmor, III, Christopher Gilmor, Mark Gilmor, Elizabeth Kleinbeck, Hether Danforth and Ashley Myles, and loving great-grandfather of eight great-grandchildren.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Linthicum and By Tom Linthicum,Sun Staff | June 11, 2000
"Not War But Murder: Cold Harbor 1864," by Ernest B. Furgurson. Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pages. $27.50. For his third contribution to Civil War nonfiction literature, Ernest B. Furgurson has chosen to focus on a dusty country crossroads 9.9 miles northeast of Richmond where, on June 3, 1864, the entrenched Confederate army of Robert E. Lee repulsed head-on attacks of Ulysses S. Grant's Union troops with staggering loss of life. Cold Harbor is often treated by historians as a bloody bump in the road during Grant's sledge-hammer and flanking campaign that resulted in his bottling up Lee's army in Petersburg and, ultimately, leading to Lee's surrender the following April.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,Sun Staff | September 12, 1999
The 2nd Maryland Infantry Battalion was organized at Winchester, Va., in the fall of 1862, of companies recruited in Richmond, Va., by officers of the old 1st Maryland Regiment and some Marylanders who had come to Virginia after the battle of Antietam.The 2nd Maryland was employed during the winter and spring of 1863 at New Market, Harrisonburg and various other points along the Valley Pike.In June 1863, when Gen. Robert E. Lee commenced his move on Pennsylvania, the 2nd Maryland fought at Winchester and then at Culp's Hill during the battle at Gettysburg.
NEWS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 1999
Thousands of Civil War re-enactors will gather at Brandy Station, Va., next weekend to commemorate the 135th anniversary of the 1864 Virginia campaign, which marked the beginning of the end for the Confederacy -- the point at which Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant took command of all the Union forces and determined to crush the South by destroying its armies, especially the Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. Robert E. Lee.The re-enactment features a "Grant vs....
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 1997
COLD HARBOR, Va. - The Union charge came with the first rays of dawn, 60,000 men swallowing their terror and scrambling into a wall of gunfire that one survivor compared to "volcanic blast."Within nine minutes, 7,000 men fell dead or wounded.That afternoon, Union commander Ulysses S. Grant cabled the War Department, "Our loss was not severe, nor do I suppose our enemy lost heavily."Grant never updated his telegram of June 3, 1864, and the War Department, citing its own sources, continued to minimize Union casualties.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | September 30, 1990
KEN BURNS' superb Civil, War series on public television reminded us how lucky we were not to have fought in that war - but how doubly lucky we are that our great-grandfathers did, and that everything came out the way it did. Today those epic battles are being refought in courthouses and, zoning commissions, and this time history is too often the loser.Last week in Culpeper County, Va., they reached a decision in the second battle of Brandy Station. This time, the good side lost. A few miles down the road in Hanover County, they are still fighting the second battle of Cold Harbor, and so far the bulldozers are ahead.
NEWS
By Michael Amon and Michael Amon,NEWSDAY | October 19, 2007
NEW YORK -- James Watson, the Nobel-winning geneticist, apologized yesterday for his comments on the intelligence of black people as outrage poured in from across the globe and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory officials gathered to decide its future with the embattled scientist. "I cannot understand how I could have said what I am quoted as having said," Watson, 79, said in a statement given to the Associated Press. "To all those who have drawn the inference from my words that Africa, as a continent, is somehow genetically inferior, I can only apologize unreservedly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 7, 2007
This might be the oldest correction ever to appear in The Sun, and it's 98 years overdue. In last week's column about Oliver Otis Howard, the Civil War general and career Army officer who founded Howard University, I quoted The New York Times, which wrote at his death in 1909 that his passing marked the "extermination of all the ranking Army officers who commanded the Union armies during the Civil War." The Sun also repeated this inaccuracy in its news story on Howard's death. Rob Loskot, a faithful reader, wrote in an e-mail a few days later that Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain died in 1914, and that "General Howard may not have been the last ranking federal officer to have died."
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