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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Six weeks after the mother of one of Baltimore's most famous baseball players was kidnapped and left bound on the side of the road in her Lincoln Town Car, the case remains a mystery to police. Aberdeen police say the abduction of Violet R. Ripken in the small Harford County city July 24 is still an active investigation. It won't become a cold case unless all leads are exhausted, Lt. Fred Budnick said Wednesday. Ripken is the mother of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. "It's not like on TV. A case isn't solved in 30 minutes or 60 minutes," Budnick said, "It takes the boots on the road to develop leads and check all of the leads out; it's a time-consuming process.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
DNA recovered from a blanket taken from a crime scene decades ago has helped prosecutors bring charges against a Baltimore man they say raped and killed a 75-year-old woman in 1981. Phillip D. Lee, 55, is charged with first-degree murder and first-degree sex offense in the death of Anna Dorthea Smith. He has been held since mid-August without bail. Police and prosecutors announced his indictment Friday. The indictment "highlights the power of DNA analysis, which led us to this defendant," Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said.
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NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
On the afternoon in April that Clarence Banks pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, Nick DeCarlo sat in Howard County Circuit Court reliving five years of his professional life. The 2003 murder of Terrence Armstead was the first De Carlo had taken on as the county's lone cold-case investigator. "When you're talking about homicide investigations and serious crimes, when you get closure and you get a disposition, especially a guilty disposition, you're satisfied and just like everybody else, you're glad to have it over with," De Carlo said the week after Banks took the plea.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Baltimore police have temporarily reassigned three homicide detectives from the cold-case squad to conduct background checks on new recruits for the rest of the year. The three officers represent the majority of the agency's five-detective squad, which investigates the thousands of unsolved murders in the city. The department spokesman said the move is designed to help the agency plug holes created by an increasing rate of departures. The department still has 41 detectives investigating homicides and other death cases.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Seniors in the forensics class at St. Paul's School scrapped the traditional blue books and delved into a real-life mystery for their final exam. Instead of an essay, they applied 21st-century tools and technology to their investigation of an unsolved 170-year-old double murder. "It's our own episode of 'Cold Case,'" said Will Stokes of Hunt Valley. "They get very lucky on TV. Our job was more tedious. " Working in teams of four in one of the Brooklandville school's co-ed classes, the students took two weeks to study the 1842 murder of Alexander and Rebecca Smith, analyze the evidence found at their Long Island farmhouse, which was the scene of the crime, and draw their conclusions based on what they discovered.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
A Baltimore man acquitted last year in two cold-case rapes - in which police said he was linked to the attacks through DNA - has been charged with murder after shooting in East Baltimore.  Herbert Mayes, 26, was charged by city homicide detectives in the March 30 killing of 59-year-old Chauncey Hardy in the 900 block of Valley St.  Mayes had been included in a database compiled by The Baltimore Sun in 2010 of several suspects charged with...
NEWS
August 17, 1995
For the past eight years, Hilda Mae Fefel has been worried that no one would ever be brought to trial for the murder of her son John Ruhs. Until this month, the March 27, 1987, killing near the Liberty Reservoir was Carroll County's only open murder case.Thanks to the renewed efforts by persistent investigators, the Ruhs case is no longer saddled with that distinction.On Aug. 4, a Carroll County grand jury indicted two men who had been previously charged in the case in 1988 but never tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2005
CRIME-SOLVING THE RESTLESS SLEEP: INSIDE NEW YORK CITY'S COLD CASE SQUAD By Stacy Horn. Viking, 336 pages. It's not altogether clear just what qualifies as a "cold case." but the distinction is making quite a difference. Top prime-time TV ratings go to a CBS show called Cold Case. A&E's excellent true-crime documentaries are Cold Case Files. Both these series portray detectives who only work "cold cases." Can the designation be defined by time? No, protracted crime investigations generally grow stale in less than a week.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
Think you're ready to out-police the police? Check out CBS tonight."JAG" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Harm (David James Elliott) ticks off Mac (Catherine Bell) by suggesting she's letting her personal feelings get in the way of her job, which is defending an admitted wife-abuser charged with murdering his wife's boyfriend. Plot contrivance: Harm's prosecuting the case. CBS."Cold Case" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Think you can do better than the police? That's the idea here, as viewers are introduced to three unsolved murders, provided with all sorts of evidence and other materials (both via the show and an Internet Web site, www.coldcase.
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | October 4, 2004
Despite being the star of the most successful new TV drama last season, Kathryn Morris can still go unrecognized in a crowd - mostly because she smiles. She hardly smiles when portraying strictly business Philly homicide Detective Lilly Rush on CBS' Cold Case. "Cold cases are not exactly the most chipper kind of work," Morris says. "She's not that perky about it because it's very serious." But the actress has a lot to smile about. She's engaged to an investment adviser. And Cold Case, unique among the police dramas in that it's led by a single actor, returned last night with considerable traction for its second season.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Joe DeFilippo felt so moved reading about slain Baltimore Civil Rights worker William Lewis Moore that he wrote a song about the postal worker who was killed 50 years ago in Alabama. DeFilippo, a 36-year Baltimore County Public Schools teacher, felt inspired to write "400 miles" about Moore after reading the June 2 story  in The Baltimore Sun about Moore's unsolved murder. Moore, 35, was killed on April 23, 1963, while on a one-man Civil Rights demonstration where he set out to walk from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., to hand deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi asking him to reverse his stance on segregation.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
Hosie Miller , a black farmer and Baptist deacon in Newton, Ga., was fatally shot in 1965 after he reportedly told a white neighbor he wanted to settle a dispute in court. The FBI closed the case in 2011, saying agents believe the neighbor was responsible, but he was dead and could not be prosecuted. O'Neal Moore , a Washington Parish, La., police officer, was killed in 1965, just a year after being named the area's first black officer. A reported white supremacist was arrested but charges were dropped.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Six weeks after the mother of one of Baltimore's most famous baseball players was kidnapped and left bound on the side of the road in her Lincoln Town Car, the case remains a mystery to police. Aberdeen police say the abduction of Violet R. Ripken in the small Harford County city July 24 is still an active investigation. It won't become a cold case unless all leads are exhausted, Lt. Fred Budnick said Wednesday. Ripken is the mother of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. "It's not like on TV. A case isn't solved in 30 minutes or 60 minutes," Budnick said, "It takes the boots on the road to develop leads and check all of the leads out; it's a time-consuming process.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
When a high court ruling came down this week limiting the use of DNA evidence, police in the state were investigating 20 cases based on DNA  collected after they arrested suspects charged with committing a violent crime or burglary. Now, it's unclear whether any of  those cases will lead to prosecutions. The Court of Appeals decision puts in question the constitutionality of collecting the samples before a conviction, and the state is considering whether to appeal the matter to theU.S.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
A Baltimore man acquitted last year in two cold-case rapes - in which police said he was linked to the attacks through DNA - has been charged with murder after shooting in East Baltimore.  Herbert Mayes, 26, was charged by city homicide detectives in the March 30 killing of 59-year-old Chauncey Hardy in the 900 block of Valley St.  Mayes had been included in a database compiled by The Baltimore Sun in 2010 of several suspects charged with...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
On Monday, it will be eight years since people last gathered in the Arnold driveway where a mortally wounded Joanne Valentine was cradled in her husband's arms. For a decade, the annual vigil on the anniversary of her homicide drew Valentine's family and friends to the site where she was shot in 1993, a reminder that the killing remained unsolved. But the vigils ended in 2003, even though the 18-year-old case is still open. "It's too painful to do it," said Pam Bustard, one of Valentine's sisters, noting that Valentine's husband and one of the couple's sons still live in the home where the shooting occurred.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | August 9, 2008
Bowie High School's Class of 1973 will gather tonight at a local hotel to dance and reminisce. They'll award gifts for distinctions like farthest traveled and youngest child. Almost certainly, someone will request a song by Steve Miller, a favorite of classmate Donna Dustin. They will also hear an impassioned plea from an Anne Arundel County cold case investigator, seeking clues in Dustin's killing 35 years ago. Seventeen-year-old Dustin was found naked and beaten beyond recognition in a deserted gravel quarry north of the Bowie racetrack after a night of partying and just a few months after graduating.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Cold-case investigators in Maryland and nearby states are forming what they say is the first regional group for those whose work is the specialized investigation of criminal cases that can be decades old. The Mid-Atlantic Cold Case Homicide Investigators Association is an outgrowth of last week's cold-case homicide conference held in Annapolis, where investigators said their increasing numbers and sophistication in their fields led them to conclude that...
EXPLORE
July 22, 2011
Laurel Police closed a nearly two-year-old homicide case July 20 when they obtained an arrest warrant for the man who allegedly murdered Laurel resident Anthony Sparacino in October 2009. Clark McKnight, 44, is being charged with first-degree murder. He is currently incarcerated in a federal jail on unrelated charges. Police Chief Richard McLaughlin said a DNA match led police to McKnight, but could not provide further details on the closure of the case. On the morning of Oct. 13, 2009, police found Sparacino dead in his Dorset Road home after responding to a call from relatives of Sparacino who had been unable to contact him for several days.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Seniors in the forensics class at St. Paul's School scrapped the traditional blue books and delved into a real-life mystery for their final exam. Instead of an essay, they applied 21st-century tools and technology to their investigation of an unsolved 170-year-old double murder. "It's our own episode of 'Cold Case,'" said Will Stokes of Hunt Valley. "They get very lucky on TV. Our job was more tedious. " Working in teams of four in one of the Brooklandville school's co-ed classes, the students took two weeks to study the 1842 murder of Alexander and Rebecca Smith, analyze the evidence found at their Long Island farmhouse, which was the scene of the crime, and draw their conclusions based on what they discovered.
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