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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Staff writer Chris Kaltenbach contributed to this article | November 26, 1996
It's a night to rally around PBS, which presents two remarkable documentaries tonight: the final installment of the fascinating "Odyssey of Life" on "Nova," and an agonizingly intimate profile about a woman, in a film made by her own daughter, on "Frontline.""Promised Land" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Delta Burke guest stars on her husband's show this week, playing Nathaniel's estranged mother. CBS."Nova: Odyssey of Life" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Lots of times, when watching the previous two installments of this fabulous, ultra-close-up look at nature and people, I asked myself, "How did the photographer get these pictures?"
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By Rachel Marsden | December 31, 2012
After a tragedy like the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn., the injection of anything short of seriousness into the subsequent public discourse about guns is touchy. But the National Rifle Association blasted numerous rounds into that particular barrier with NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre's mouth. The organization's hysteric solution to gun violence in America is to put designated sitting ducks - er, "armed police officers" - in every American school.
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FEATURES
By William Grimes and William Grimes,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
It could have been called the Preppy Murder, but in 1836 the word "preppy" did not exist. Nevertheless, New York fed on the Jewett case with a carnal appetite. The scandal was just too, too delicious.The evidence was circumstantial but damning. In the early hours of April 10, Rosina Townsend, the owner of a brothel at 41 Thomas St. in Manhattan, discovered the body of Sarah Jewett in one of the bedrooms. Jewett, a prostitute, had been struck on the head, which was badly gashed and bleeding.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
A man accused of slaying a Towson gas station owner last year was "under an incredible amount of pressure from a woman who would go to the ends of the earth to have her husband killed," his attorney told jurors during opening Friday in a trial that could be the first test of Maryland's new death penalty law. Walter Bishop Jr., 29, is charged with killing William Porter after being hired by Porter's wife, Karla. Karla Porter is scheduled to face trial next year. Under a law passed two years ago, death penalty cases in Maryland must include DNA or video evidence.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 23, 1996
It is midnight in a police car on a rainy highway somewhere between civilization and the gallows as Perry Smith starts to tell his tale of blood and hair on the walls.The story of how Smith and Dick Hickock, two sorry ex-cons, butchered a seemingly all-American family in their Holcomb, Kan., farmhouse in 1959, came to be known as "In Cold Blood" when published by Truman Capote in 1965. The "nonfiction novel" was made into a black-and-white feature film two years later by Richard Brooks."In Cold Blood" is one of the most profound and awful stories of life and death in the second half of 20th century America.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | October 30, 2005
Before he declined, he dazzled. While some writers gain power as they mature, Truman Capote, subject of a new feature film, Capote, spiraled down, personally and professionally. But several of his works, mostly the early ones, qualify as very good literature: Other Voices, Other Rooms: This 1948 book was Capote's first published novel, and it was a fine start. Vivid and lean, it's the story of Joel Knox, who is searching for his lost father - a theme drawn directly from Capote's life.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
As a kidnapping and murder trial opened in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, city prosecutors argued that defendant Gregory Kevin Thomas committed a killing "in cold blood," while the defense lawyer said his client had "nothing to do with any murder." Thomas, 22, is on trial in the robbery and killing of Darryl "Tank" Dennis in Southwest Baltimore in 2001, a crime prosecutors said he committed while wearing a Frankenstein Halloween mask. Thomas is also charged with the attempted murder of Dennis' close friend, Michael Wolfe, who was able to escape.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1995
As of yesterday, John Berendt's book, "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil," is no longer on the New York Times best-seller list.But don't cry for him, Savannah. His account of an infamous murder trial in that Georgia coastal town had an 89-week ride on the list and has sold more than 700,000 copies to date. He was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and winner of the Southern Book Award. Tourism is going up, up, up in Savannah. And today, he starts a 13-city book tour, his second, with a reading at Baltimore's Bibelot at 8 p.m."
FEATURES
By Madison Smartt Bell and Madison Smartt Bell,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
"Gloria" is a novel about a man named Stone writing a book about a woman named Lauren writing a book about his (Stone's) nTC dead sister, who wasn't named Gloria, but called herself that, and who (as the reader will be relieved to learn) didn't write any books herself. Gloria, as a matter of fact, barely even wrote a postcard. She's a mystery wrapped up in a lot of different wrappers. In a work of this kind, the layers themselves are often of as much or more interest as the kernel inside, but Mark Coovelis' first novel doesn't entirely follow that rule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | January 9, 2000
"On the Rez," by Ian Frazier. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 320 pages. $25. This book should bury the notion that a talented writer can make any subject fascinating. That was the prevailing conceit at the New Yorker under Harold Ross, William Shawn and Robert Gottlieb. Writers were routinely handed acres of white space, if not the entire magazine, to slowly unspool their wondrous tapestries. When it worked -- John Hersey's "Hiroshima," Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" -- the results were glorious and form-breaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Krause, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Tim Hoen loves his reptiles so much, he's written them into his will. Hoen, the founder of the Mid-Atlantic Reptile Show, owns several turtles, which can live to be 150 years old. If Hoen doesn't hit 150 himself, he wants his pets to be provided for. "The right reptile can make a person very happy," Hoen said. "They will outlive me, and I want to make sure they are taken care of. " This same passion for pets is present in Hoen's work. The reptile show, which comes to the Maryland State Fairgrounds this weekend, is run by the nonprofit MARS Preservation Fund, which Hoen founded.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
A Severn man charged in what the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's Office called "a cold-blooded execution" was taken into custody on Thursday after he had been released on bond by a District Court judge last week. James William King Jr., 26, who was charged in the August 6 shooting death of Calvin Chi Man Yeung, 40, appeared in a District Court hearing Thursday rescinding his bond set by District Court Judge Jonas Legum last week. King, who has seven prior convictions on charges that include assault, an escape from home detention and drug offenses, posted bond and was released Friday.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
I met this handsome fellow on Fernandina, the youngest of the Galapagos Islands, during a weeklong cruise last December. He and his fellow marine iguanas live in a landscape dominated by huge shield volcanoes. It truly feels like The Land Before Time. Anne-Marie Sack Parkville The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
As he pleaded guilty to killing two grown men in separate West Baltimore shootings last year, the 16-year-old offered no explanation for his crimes and no apology to his victims' families. Zachary James, one of the city's youngest and most brazen murder suspects, had no words at all during yesterday's court hearing, a day before he was to stand trial. He pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder and two counts of using a handgun in the commission of a crime. He was sentenced to 60 years in prison, the first 10 to be served without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | October 30, 2005
Before he declined, he dazzled. While some writers gain power as they mature, Truman Capote, subject of a new feature film, Capote, spiraled down, personally and professionally. But several of his works, mostly the early ones, qualify as very good literature: Other Voices, Other Rooms: This 1948 book was Capote's first published novel, and it was a fine start. Vivid and lean, it's the story of Joel Knox, who is searching for his lost father - a theme drawn directly from Capote's life.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 23, 2005
PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN HAS always had something extra behind the eyeballs: a glint of high or lowdown wit, a surfeit of mischief or creative energy. A prize supporting actor for more than a decade, he's played everything from a droll oversize preppie with an annoying sense of truth, in The Talented Mr. Ripley, to a sleazy tabloid reporter who gets a flaming sendoff from a serial killer, in the Hannibal Lecter thriller, Red Dragon. In three dozen films, playing big men who move with misguided confidence or sometimes genuine grace, Hoffman had become an heir to the great Hollywood character actors -- the kind that audiences loved seeing even if they couldn't instantaneously recall the performers' names.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 12, 2000
JENNIFER BISHOP denies us cheap sentimentality. When she clicks her camera's shutter, she delivers no easy comforts and no reassuring cliches. You want cheap emotions, buy a Hallmark card. You want kittens playing with a ball of yarn, dig up an old Norman Rockwell. Bishop offers wry ironies that look unsettlingly like the truth. She is the anti-Hallmark card, the anti-Norman Rockwell vision of our surroundings. Hey, Norm, put down that paint brush and come look at life! Bishop has been photographing Baltimore and the outer world for the last 23 years, mostly for the City Paper, briefly for the old News American, quite steadily for magazines and design firms and advertising agencies all over the world, and now she has her first solo show - "Men, Women and Children: 20 Years of Photographs" - at the new Photo Works gallery on Chestnut Avenue in the city's Hampden neighborhood.
NEWS
July 3, 2004
A `good society' must take life to protect itself In his column "A good society's answers to death penalty's backers" (June 27), Dan Rodricks presents what he says are the most frequent pro-death-penalty arguments he's heard and proceeds to knock each down. This is easily accomplished because of his definition of what makes a good society. He says a good society "would view human life as inviolate to the extent that the state may not kill in cold blood." But what is the difference between the state killing in cold blood and sending its troops to war?
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Jason T. Richards said only two words during his sentencing hearing yesterday. His attorney offered the briefest of arguments, asking only that the judge keep in mind that Richards played no physical role in the murder he was convicted of plotting and ordering friends to carry out. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Patrick Cavanaugh had much more to say. "Life means nothing to you or your friends. Without a doubt, you are the most cold-blooded people I have ever seen. You don't deserve to walk the streets with the rest of us," he said yesterday in sentencing Richards to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murder of a 15-year-old Woodlawn girl who was choked to death and whose body was set on fire last year to keep her from testifying against Richards in a statutory rape case.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
Prosecutors began yesterday to lay out the web of scientific evidence that they say links 24-year-old Jamaal K. Abeokuto to the kidnapping and killing of his girlfriend's 8-year-old daughter in December 2002. In his opening statement in the Baltimore man's trial, Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said that blood believed to have come from young Marciana Ringo was found on jeans linked to Abeokuto. Authorities also found Abeokuto's fingerprint on a ransom letter mailed to the girl's mother and Abeokuto's DNA on the envelope flap that was licked to seal the note, which demanded $5,000 for the girl's return, Cassilly said.
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