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June 23, 1993
July 13, 1993Oriole Park at Camden YardsStan Musial is the all-time home run leader in All-Star play with six. Tied for second on the list are Ted Williams and former Oriole Fred Lynn -- the all-time American League leaders -- with four apiece. Next on the list with three are Willie Mays, Ralph Kiner, Harmon Killebrew, Gary Carter, Rocky Colavito and Johnny Bench.
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SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Before the Texas Rangers' Josh Hamilton did it Tuesday night, the Cleveland Indians' Rocky Colavito was the only player to hit four home runs in a game against the Orioles. Colavito went deep four times at Memorial Stadium on June 10, 1959. Here's a story The Sun ran 30 years later, reflecting on the slugger's feat.   June 18, 1989 ROCKY IV 30 years ago, Rocky Colavito ended a slump by becoming only the third player to hit four homers in four consecutive at-bats in a nine-inning game Rocky Colavito clicked his way down the tunnel from the visitors clubhouse and emerged in the Cleveland Indians dugout carrying his K-55 bats -- 33-ounce models that most hitters would consider light when compared with the weight of a 3-for-28 batting skid.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 6, 1994
If Moliere's archetypal hypocrite, Tartuffe, were alive today, he'd probably be a TV evangelist with a 900 number for phone-in donations.At Theatre Hopkins, Tony Colavito doesn't make the character's sleazy duplicity that obvious, and director Suzanne Pratt doesn't update the play to the present. But she does move the 17th century French comedy to the 1950s, and Colavito is slimy enough to pass for, say, a used car salesman -- one with a taste for Caddies and Jags."Tartuffe" can rise or fall based on the portrayal of the title character, and Colavito doesn't disappoint.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 24, 2005
There are a number of surprises in Lewis Schrager's play Levy's Ghost. Chief among them is that the ghost isn't the spirit of protagonist Uriah Phillips Levy, it's the spirit of Thomas Jefferson. The two men are connected because Levy purchased the third president's home, Monticello, in 1836, when the historic structure was near ruin. But Levy did more than rescue the landmark estate. Though far less well-known than Jefferson, Levy occupies an important place in American history, and Schrager's biographical play fills in this gap in most textbooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 21, 2000
Fell's Point Corner Theatre opens its season tomorrow with an off-Broadway romantic comedy, "What a Man Weighs," by Sherry Kramer. Set in the book-conservation lab of a university, the play is an examination of sexual politics. Tony Colavito plays a book conservator, and Paris Obligin, Debra Bennett and Lydia Lea Real are the women in his life. Direction is by Alex Willis. Show times at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, and 8 p.m. Oct. 19, through Oct. 22. Tickets are $11 and $12. Call 410-276-7837.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 2, 1996
Judging from David Mamet's "Glengarry Glen Ross," the generation of salesmen that has come after Willy Loman doesn't believe that being well liked is what counts.What counts is closing the sale -- period. Closing it any way you can. If that means acting friendly, so be it. If it means using outright deceit, that's OK, too.One of the best scenes in Theatre Hopkins' production of this indictment of the real estate industry comes when hotshot salesman Richard Roma joins forces with his mentor, Shelly "the Machine" Levene, to hoodwink a client.
SPORTS
August 12, 1997
Blue Jays: Joe Carter's homer was his 374th, moving him past Rocky Colavito into 37th place all-time.Braves: The sellout crowd gave the team a season attendance of 2,536,239, the sixth consecutive year it has surpassed 2.5 million. Shortstop Jeff Blauser didn't start for the second game in a row after being spiked on his left foot.Mets: Pete Harnisch is 0-6 in 12 starts in the majors since winning last Aug. 8.Rangers: Catcher Ivan Rodriguez, who signed a five-year, $42 million contract on July 31, took the night off. He has six hits in his past 40 games.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal | May 27, 1999
Playwright David Mamet's award-winning dark comedy "American Buffalo" will make its first appearance at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback tomorrow and will run through June 13.The angry and harrowing play, which won the Drama Critics Circle Award for best American play and the Obie Award in 1977, put Mamet on the cultural and theatrical map.The story of the greedy pawnshop owner Donny, a loser ex-convict named Teach and a naive boy called Bobby...
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | May 11, 1995
With the Cleveland Indians coming in tomorrow night to begin a weekend series with the Orioles, we are reminded of one of sport's most important truths:It all starts at the top.That's right -- success begins not on the playing field or in the dugout or on the coaching lines; it starts at the ownership level.The Indians are easily the most glaring example of this in baseball, a conclusion author Terry Pluto develops well in his book "The Curse of Rocky Colavito," subtitled "A Loving Look at a 30-year Slump."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 30, 1992
There's a long tradition of writers writing about writing and there's a tradition at least as long of stories about the seemingly good-and-noble selling their souls to the devil. For Australian screenwriter David Williamson, "Emerald City" is the magical land where the two traditions meet.The play, which is receiving its Baltimore premiere at Theatre Hopkins, is heavy on chat and short on action. Nor does it help that the primary issue being chatted up is the definition of success -- not the most dramatic of subjects.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 23, 2001
Chuck Spoler's Memorial Day is the rare Baltimore Playwrights Festival offering that has just about everything going for it - a script with good character development, fluid dialogue and a neat plot twist, as well as a production that displays assured direction and two of the festival's strongest performances. Director Rodney Bonds' production at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre exemplifies the type of developmental work that can go on in this festival. Memorial Day started out as two related one-act plays.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 8, 2001
Four musicals, ranging from the revival of a Broadway classic to a show that opens on Broadway next month, will highlight the 2001-2002 season at the Lyric Opera House. The lineup includes: "Guys and Dolls"; "Saturday Night Fever"; "Blast!"; and "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas," starring Ann-Margret in her theatrical debut. Although the number of subscription shows is down from six this season, Performing Arts Productions, which books the series, is also bringing in return engagements of five other attractions, which will be available to subscribers at a discount.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 21, 2000
Fell's Point Corner Theatre opens its season tomorrow with an off-Broadway romantic comedy, "What a Man Weighs," by Sherry Kramer. Set in the book-conservation lab of a university, the play is an examination of sexual politics. Tony Colavito plays a book conservator, and Paris Obligin, Debra Bennett and Lydia Lea Real are the women in his life. Direction is by Alex Willis. Show times at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, and 8 p.m. Oct. 19, through Oct. 22. Tickets are $11 and $12. Call 410-276-7837.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 1999
David Mamet's "American Buffalo" is a gritty, poetic (though often profane) and explosive play that doesn't quite explode in the Performing Arts Group's production at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback.This three-character drama made Mamet's name when it debuted in the mid-1970s, and it bears many of the Mamet hallmarks: terse language, action-oriented characters, a plot with a scam.In this case, the scam never quite comes off: Things go awry when the ineffective thieves begin to suspect that they are the ones getting taken.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal | May 27, 1999
Playwright David Mamet's award-winning dark comedy "American Buffalo" will make its first appearance at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback tomorrow and will run through June 13.The angry and harrowing play, which won the Drama Critics Circle Award for best American play and the Obie Award in 1977, put Mamet on the cultural and theatrical map.The story of the greedy pawnshop owner Donny, a loser ex-convict named Teach and a naive boy called Bobby...
SPORTS
August 12, 1997
Blue Jays: Joe Carter's homer was his 374th, moving him past Rocky Colavito into 37th place all-time.Braves: The sellout crowd gave the team a season attendance of 2,536,239, the sixth consecutive year it has surpassed 2.5 million. Shortstop Jeff Blauser didn't start for the second game in a row after being spiked on his left foot.Mets: Pete Harnisch is 0-6 in 12 starts in the majors since winning last Aug. 8.Rangers: Catcher Ivan Rodriguez, who signed a five-year, $42 million contract on July 31, took the night off. He has six hits in his past 40 games.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 30, 1992
There's a long tradition of writers writing about writing and there's a tradition at least as long of stories about the seemingly good-and-noble selling their souls to the devil. For Australian screenwriter David Williamson, "Emerald City" is the magical land where the two traditions meet.The play, which is receiving its Baltimore premiere at Theatre Hopkins, is heavy on chat and short on action. Nor does it help that the primary issue being chatted up is the definition of success -- not the most dramatic of subjects.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 1999
David Mamet's "American Buffalo" is a gritty, poetic (though often profane) and explosive play that doesn't quite explode in the Performing Arts Group's production at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback.This three-character drama made Mamet's name when it debuted in the mid-1970s, and it bears many of the Mamet hallmarks: terse language, action-oriented characters, a plot with a scam.In this case, the scam never quite comes off: Things go awry when the ineffective thieves begin to suspect that they are the ones getting taken.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 2, 1996
Judging from David Mamet's "Glengarry Glen Ross," the generation of salesmen that has come after Willy Loman doesn't believe that being well liked is what counts.What counts is closing the sale -- period. Closing it any way you can. If that means acting friendly, so be it. If it means using outright deceit, that's OK, too.One of the best scenes in Theatre Hopkins' production of this indictment of the real estate industry comes when hotshot salesman Richard Roma joins forces with his mentor, Shelly "the Machine" Levene, to hoodwink a client.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | May 11, 1995
With the Cleveland Indians coming in tomorrow night to begin a weekend series with the Orioles, we are reminded of one of sport's most important truths:It all starts at the top.That's right -- success begins not on the playing field or in the dugout or on the coaching lines; it starts at the ownership level.The Indians are easily the most glaring example of this in baseball, a conclusion author Terry Pluto develops well in his book "The Curse of Rocky Colavito," subtitled "A Loving Look at a 30-year Slump."
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