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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Liz Atwood and Timothy B. Wheeler and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1991
Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s decision to idle its coke ovens at Sparrows Point because of chronic pollution problems comes as the federal government turns up the heat on the nation's steel industry to cut down on toxic emissions.Bethlehem, which announced yesterday it would stop makincoke at Sparrows Point until it can fix leaks from its ovens, is the third steelmaker in the mid-Atlantic region to be sued this year by the Environmental Protection Agency.Though spokesmen for Bethlehem Steel and for the EPA said thcompany made its decision to halt coke production independently from state and federal enforcement actions, industry officials predicted that other steelmakers may follow Beth Steel.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2008
Seventeen years after the smoke-belching coke ovens at Sparrows Point were shut down because of chronic pollution, the plant's new owner is considering a new plant at the sprawling Baltimore County steel mill, a move that would mean new jobs and help cement its future but is also likely to raise concerns in a community tinged with memories of black soot and foul air. The Russian steel company Severstal, which completed an $810 million deal to buy the...
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie | September 17, 1991
The black plume of smoke that has become Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s signature in the sky will disappear by the end of the year when the steelmaker temporarily shuts down its coke ovens to meet environmental standards.The cost of cleaner air will be 500 of the plant's 6,800 jobs, although company officials said they hope to reassign many of those workers as others retire or leave.The two-year shutdown comes as the Sparrows Point company was spending $92 million to clean up its emissions of grit, toxic chemicals and sulfur dioxide, an ingredient of acid rain.
NEWS
August 28, 2006
Adam Philip Moore Sr., a longtime Bethlehem Steel Corp. foreman who oversaw the coke ovens there and then, as an environmental consultant, helped dismantle them once the Sparrows Point plant was sold, died of heart failure Aug. 21 in Jarrettsville in his car on the way to play golf. The Jarrettsville and former Parkville resident was 72. Two years after retirement, Mr. Moore returned to the Sparrows Point plant in 1996 to ensure that hazardous wastes were properly disposed of as the coke ovens were demolished.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp. is exploring whether to rebuild and reopen a controversial coke oven battery at its Sparrows Point mill, which it closed in 1991 after environmental disputes that cost the company $3.5 million in fines and led to the layoff of 400 workers.The company said it has not decided whether to rebuild one of its three old coke ovens, which bake coal until the heat converts it into coke. Coke is used to fire ultra-hot steelmaking furnaces.But Beth Steel has filed a permit application with the state Department of the Environment.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | July 29, 1991
If all goes as planned, sometime late this year, something should be missing from Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s steel plant at Sparrows Point.The sour, dusty smell of hot coal.Four years after the nation's second-largest steelmaker settled a large air pollution fine by agreeing to clean up its coke ovens, construction of the cleanup devices is nearing completion.Environmental officials and many neighbors had complained for years that the ovens, which bake coal at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit for 24 hours to turn it into a hard, pure fuel called coke, were outdated and environmentally deficient.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | May 2, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. will pay $3.5 million in fines over the next two years for air pollution violations caused by the now-idled coke ovens at its Sparrows Point plant, state and federal officials announced yesterday.The penalty, the largest ever assessed for pollution violations in Maryland, is to be paid as part of a settlement of lawsuits filed against Bethlehem Steel in the past two years by state and federal environmental agencies.The settlement ends a long-running dispute between the steelmaker and government officials over the coke ovens.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Timothy B. Wheeler and Liz Atwood and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | September 16, 1991
Bethlehem Steel Corp. today announced that it will shut down the coke ovens at its Sparrows Point plant for at least two years, forcing the layoff or retraining of 500 workers as it seeks to fix air pollution problems that have forced the company to pay $300,000 in fines so far.Production of coke, which is used to extract the iron used in steel making, will be halted by the end of the year, according to plant spokesman G. Ted Baldwin.Bethlehem Steel's move comes as Sparrows Point continues to spew black smoke, toxic gases and grit from its smokestacks, despite a $92 million overhaul of the plant begun two years ago in an effort to curb pollution.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | October 5, 1990
It seemed to state officials that Bethlehem Steel Inc. was willing to accept fines of $1,000 a day for air pollution violations simply as a cost of doing business. So the state upped the stakes yesterday and sued the giant steelmaker for a record $1.07 million.Bethlehem Steel is lagging behind the schedule set in a landmark 1987 consent order, committing the corporation to spend up to $92 million to reduce the smoke and toxic chemicals that spew into the air from coke ovens, which heat coal in the steel-making process.
NEWS
August 28, 2006
Adam Philip Moore Sr., a longtime Bethlehem Steel Corp. foreman who oversaw the coke ovens there and then, as an environmental consultant, helped dismantle them once the Sparrows Point plant was sold, died of heart failure Aug. 21 in Jarrettsville in his car on the way to play golf. The Jarrettsville and former Parkville resident was 72. Two years after retirement, Mr. Moore returned to the Sparrows Point plant in 1996 to ensure that hazardous wastes were properly disposed of as the coke ovens were demolished.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2001
BETHLEHEM, Pa. - Robert F. Barron Jr. holds the future of the Lehigh Valley region in his hands - a map showing 1,800 acres in the middle of Bethlehem. He's talking about brownfields and revitalization, industry and history - and shopping. His focus is on how the development arm of his Enterprise Real Estate Services Inc., based in Columbia, will help industrial giant Bethlehem Steel turn those acres that hold a hulking, defunct steel plant into a family attraction and a centerpiece for the 360-year-old town.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp. is exploring whether to rebuild and reopen a controversial coke oven battery at its Sparrows Point mill, which it closed in 1991 after environmental disputes that cost the company $3.5 million in fines and led to the layoff of 400 workers.The company said it has not decided whether to rebuild one of its three old coke ovens, which bake coal until the heat converts it into coke. Coke is used to fire ultra-hot steelmaking furnaces.But Beth Steel has filed a permit application with the state Department of the Environment.
NEWS
August 13, 1994
Dear DiaryThis is a new one. Joshua Steiner: "I lied to my diary." Wow.Charles C. GardnerBaltimoreThe ConstellationYour Aug. 7 editorial, "Don't Give Up the Ship," is precisely the kind of positive support required to save the Constellation from the burial-at-sea fate for which she was destined when saved by the Baltimore area community in the early 1950s.The Constellation arrived in the sheltered waters of the Patapsco several days before a disastrous hurricane reached the Atlantic coast.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Just when Baltimore County highway officials thought they were safe from the nightmare of ice, snow, freezing rain and complaints about unplowed streets, along comes the slag menace -- 40,000 tons of it.Residents have been complaining about the gritty, dusty cinders dumped on their roads to give drivers traction on ice, and officials now say highway crews will pick up the mess they left behind.The slag dust has been a nuisance for car owners who finally got a chance to wash away the winter salt, and a hazard for youngsters on in-line skates.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | May 2, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. will pay $3.5 million in fines over the next two years for air pollution violations caused by the now-idled coke ovens at its Sparrows Point plant, state and federal officials announced yesterday.The penalty, the largest ever assessed for pollution violations in Maryland, is to be paid as part of a settlement of lawsuits filed against Bethlehem Steel in the past two years by state and federal environmental agencies.The settlement ends a long-running dispute between the steelmaker and government officials over the coke ovens.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | September 18, 1991
While cleaning up the air around Baltimore and saving the company costly pollution fines, Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s decision to suspend operations at its Sparrows Point coke ovens could hurt the U.S. steel industry's competitiveness, industry experts said yesterday.Idling the coke ovens will delay or scuttle a couple of federally funded experiments that might have allowed similar facilities nationwide to operate with far lower pollution.And, industry officials say, closing the three Baltimore batteries (where coal is baked into a hard, pure form of carbon called coke)
NEWS
September 18, 1991
Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant has belched out black smoke for as long as anybody living nearby can remember -- 1,350 tons of soot and dust each year. Documents supplied to the Maryland Department of the Environment show that, in addition, 300 tons of benzene, a carcinogen, and 2,400 tons of sulfur dioxide also come pouring out of the mill's tall stacks each year. That contributes mightily to the air pollution that made Baltimore one of America's nine worst cities for "non-attainment" of Clean Air Act standards.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | September 18, 1991
While cleaning up the air around Baltimore and saving the company costly pollution fines, Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s decision to suspend operations at its Sparrows Point coke ovens could hurt the U.S. steel industry's competitiveness, industry experts said yesterday.Idling the coke ovens will delay or scuttle a couple of federally funded experiments that might have allowed similar facilities nationwide to operate with far lower pollution.And, industry officials say, closing the three Baltimore batteries (where coal is baked into a hard, pure form of carbon called coke)
NEWS
September 18, 1991
Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant has belched out black smoke for as long as anybody living nearby can remember -- 1,350 tons of soot and dust each year. Documents supplied to the Maryland Department of the Environment show that, in addition, 300 tons of benzene, a carcinogen, and 2,400 tons of sulfur dioxide also come pouring out of the mill's tall stacks each year. That contributes mightily to the air pollution that made Baltimore one of America's nine worst cities for "non-attainment" of Clean Air Act standards.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | September 17, 1991
The black plume of smoke that has become Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s signature in the sky will disappear by the end of the year when the steelmaker temporarily shuts down its coke ovens to meet environmental standards.The cost of cleaner air will be 500 of the plant's 6,800 jobs, although company officials said they hope to reassign many of those workers as others retire or leave.The two-year shutdown comes as the Sparrows Point company was spending $92 million to clean up its emissions of grit, toxic chemicals and sulfur dioxide, an ingredient of acid rain.
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