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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Michael K. Williams, who played Omar in "The Wire," is talking about his years of drug abuse and saying he's surprised it didn't lead to him ending up in a body bag. Williams tells the Newark Star-Ledger that while he was playing Omar in the Baltimore-based HBO series, he was doing cocaine and marijuana and hanging around with felons on some of the scarier streets of Newark. “I was playing with fire,” Williams tells the paper. “It was just a matter of time before I got caught and my business ended up on the cover of a tabloid or I went to jail or, worse, I ended up dead.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad | February 10, 2014
Hey, "The Walking Dead" is back on AMC! It's been two months since we've been able to spend our Sunday nights watching men and women in tattered clothing brutally slaughtering rotting men and women in even more tattered clothing/skin, unless you happened to catch that one really weird episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" on the Memorable Entertainment network. Sunday night's return - titled "After" - was a very strong showing, in this humble blogger's opinion. If you didn't start getting a little choked up during the scene where little Carl almost has to squeeze the trigger to put down his father, Rick, you might want to be tested to see if you're a serial killer.
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NEWS
November 2, 1999
Here is an edited excerpt of an editorial from the San Francisco Chronicle, which was published Thursday.SOFT DRINK enthusiasts are reeling at news that Coca-Cola Co. is developing technology designed to automatically boost prices in Coke machines on hot days when demand is up.Such a cynical ploy to exploit the thirst of faithful customers is shameful and should be rejected immediately.When word of the scheme got out last week, Coca-Cola flacks denied plans to put such a machine in the marketplace "anytime soon."
NEWS
November 3, 2013
If Coca-Cola really wants to prevent obesity in kids, as they say ( "Coca-Cola has taken steps to help reduce obesity," Oct. 27), they need to respect reality. The beverage giant spends two-thirds of its marketing budget inflating sales of its most sugary drinks. The reason: Advertising works. That's why they get blamed in the obesity epidemic. Coca-Cola does offer other choices - no- or low-calorie options we eagerly promote on our Better Beverage Finder (www.betterbeveragefinder.org/)
NEWS
August 8, 1994
For months, county officials suspected there was a problem with Coca Cola Enterprises' proposed Howard County plant. After rushing through the county's approval process, Coke hadn't started construction on the $200 million state-of-the-art bottling and distribution plant. Now Coke is stepping forward with an explanation: Competition in the beverage industry is forcing the company to change directions and rethink its emphasis on carbonated drinks.The company informed disappointed state and county officials last week about their decision to put the proposed Dorsey plant on hold.
NEWS
October 12, 1992
Have a Coke and a smile, Maryland.Indeed, the reports that Coca-Cola Enterprises plans to build a state-of-the-art manufacturing and bottling plant in Dorsey has Howard County and state officials grinning like those happy, soda-sipping folks from the soft drink commercials."
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Jay Hancock and Kevin L. McQuaid and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writers | July 22, 1995
Coca-Cola USA yesterday informed 125 local employees of plans to build a $60 million plant in Pennsylvania, a move that seriously jeopardizes the future of its 73-year-old syrup-making plant in South Baltimore.While Coke stopped short of saying it would close the 1215 E. Fort Ave. plant, that is the expected result of the Atlanta-based soft drink maker's decision to complete a facility in Allentown, Pa., by the end of 1997."Obviously this will have a big impact on the jobs in Baltimore," said Ben Deutsch, a Coca-Cola spokesman.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
The Ecker administration last night asked the County Council to hold an emergency legislative session Thursday morning to help salvage what may be a rapidly unraveling deal with Coca-Cola.Although never talked about officially, sources close to the negotiations said Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. had signed a letter of intent to buy the 120-acre Parkway Corporate Center for $16.8 million and build a 650,000-square-foot regional headquarters and bottling plant there.The letter of intent expired Sept.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Annapolis, which shut down bottling operations and became a sales and distribution center last year, will closeMay 1, company officials announced yesterday.The 48 workers at the Riva Road plant will be offered transfers to other Coke plants, said Kate Whiting, spokeswoman for the Columbia-based Coca-Cola Enterprises Northeast.The bottling and distribution arm of Coca-Cola Co. bought the plant a year ago from a local family, halted all bottling and planned touse the plant entirely to distribute and sell products in Anne Arundel County, Whiting said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
As far as Howard County is concerned, things will indeed go better with Coke, local business people say. Much, much better.It's not merely the $4 million a year the company is expected to add to the county budget by way of corporate property taxes or the 700 new workers who will be assigned to Coke's state-of-the-art production and distribution facility in Dorsey.It's also what Rouse Co. vice president Alton J. Scavo ecstatically calls "the wonderful spinoffs" -- a new economic vitality created by an increased demand for local goods and services combined with help for schools and non-profits from "an established, world-class corporate citizen."
NEWS
October 26, 2013
We agree with The Sun's editors that obesity is one of the country's most serious health issues ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). However, targeting soda alone, absent a focus on actions and efforts to achieve healthier diets and lifestyles, will not result in our collective goal of healthier communities. To manage weight, most experts agree the key is an active, healthy lifestyle. There are many factors that underpin these three words, but I will focus on two - a balanced, sensible diet and regular physical activity.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
I guess I wasn't surprised by your recent editorial slamming colas and other sugary beverages ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). It's obvious you firmly believe that no one is ever responsible for anything that happens in his or her life because it's always someone else's fault. I was waiting to read a sentence that blamed George Bush, but thankfully that road was left untraveled, for a change. I grew up in the 1970s, and colas (Coke and many others) were as available then as they are now, possibly even more so. Our high school had a vending machine that dispensed soft drinks.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Common Core is the "New Coke" of education reform. The propaganda tells us that it is "more rigorous" and "deeper," but parents are getting a taste of it now and it is not as good as what we had in Howard County. There is no independent research or empirical evidence to back up the claims that Common Core is a better way to teach. Common Core has been found by many child clinical psychologists to be developmental inappropriate for children in the elementary grades. It asks children to think in ways that their developing brains are not yet capable of doing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Sparrows Point's landowner turned down a Maryland Port Administration offer to use part of the property for containing dredge material, but both sides said Wednesday that it's not the final word. "We're not really taking this at all as a closed-door situation," said port spokesman Richard Scher, who said the rejection came last week. "This is part of negotiating, and we recognize that. " Scher said the port has a meeting next week with Environmental Liability Transfer, which owns the land and some of the buildings on the former steel-mill property.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Bernard J. "B.J. " Land, a Coca-Cola executive and physical fitness buff who coached youth soccer and lacrosse teams, died Monday of a cardiac arrest at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Hunt Valley resident had recently celebrated his 53rd birthday. Family members said that Mr. Land, who was known as "B.J.," had returned Sept. 2 after a long bike ride and suffered a cardiac arrest that was caused by coronary artery disease, which he was unaware that he suffered from. He remained in a coma until his death.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Michael K. Williams, who played Omar in "The Wire," is talking about his years of drug abuse and saying he's surprised it didn't lead to him ending up in a body bag. Williams tells the Newark Star-Ledger that while he was playing Omar in the Baltimore-based HBO series, he was doing cocaine and marijuana and hanging around with felons on some of the scarier streets of Newark. “I was playing with fire,” Williams tells the paper. “It was just a matter of time before I got caught and my business ended up on the cover of a tabloid or I went to jail or, worse, I ended up dead.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | December 5, 1993
Q: I have over 800 different Coca-Cola items, yet there is a lot I do not know. I have a yellow plastic-handled pen knife, 3 3/4 inches long, marked "Drink/Coca-Cola/Trademark (R)/in Bottles/5 cents/World Fair/Chicago/1933." I have "Petretti's Coca-Cola Collectibles Price Guide, 8th Edition," by Allan Petretti. On page 384 this knife is pictured, and he says it was made in the 1970s to 1980s and is worth $1 to $2. In a friend's copy of the "Kovels' Antiques and Collectibles Price List, 1993," on page 166 it shows the same knife for $135.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Herbert Fried was preparing for a party marking his 40th anniversary at W.B. Doner & Co. last month when the ad agency's 66-year-old chairman was interrupted by the kind of present he had long hoped for.On the phone was Sergio Zyman, a former client who had since taken a job as advertising chief for Coca-Cola Co. The Atlanta beverage behemoth spent $1.3 billion in advertising last year, but had never spent anything with Doner. That was about to change."This is one of the biggest names to come to Doner in its history," Mr. Fried said yesterday, after word that Coke had tapped Doner for undisclosed "special projects" leaked out to the advertising trade press.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
The vintage Coca-Cola machine is a gorgeous artifact of American history, so Coke has wisely made it a centerpiece to its Father's Day campaign (my apologies for being a bit late on this). Nostalgia-bait? Don Draper would approve. And, because you're seeing it on this blog, the commercial has a Baltimore connection, specifically local singer-songwriter Mike McFadden's song "Get It Together" is used in "The Perfectionist" clip. Watch it above, and listen to the multi-instrumentalist's music at McFadden's Facebook page . McFadden plays his album release show at the 8x10 in Federal Hill on June 29 with The Lombards, Drunken Camel and Cool Hand & the Swagger (it's getting hard to come up with new band names, huh?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katrina Galsim | February 9, 2012
It's now the group round, "the most infamous night of Hollywood Week," Ryan Seacrest narrates. "For the past 10 years here, it's been the ultimate test of strength, endurance and determination. The critical challenge that truly separates the pack. "It involves pitting clashing personalities against a nearly impossible task: In just one night, the contestants must form into groups, choose from a list of 20 songs, design choreography and master their routine. And all of this with the expectation of perfection when they hit the stage the following morning.
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