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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
He came, he saw, he cognac-ed. An annual ritual continued in Baltimore early yesterday, as a stranger made his way to the grave of writer Edgar Allan Poe, leaving behind a half-full bottle of Martell's Cognac and three red roses to mark the 191st anniversary of the writer's birthday. The so-called Poe Toaster -- a role believed to have been played by at least three men to date -- has visited the grave behind Westminster Hall every year since 1949. That year happened to mark the 100th anniversary of Poe's death in Baltimore, yet another mystery that has never been solved to anyone's satisfaction.
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FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2000
For most of us in Baltimore, the annual visit to the gravesite of Edgar Allan Poe is a romantic mystery. What other writer so inflamed the public's imagination that a cloaked "Visitor" would arrive at his grave every year for 50 years, bearing cognac and three roses? Will he appear again this year? We will know the answer early Wednesday morning, the 191st anniversary of Poe's birth. But Baltimorean Albert Donnay finds the ritual a little worrisome. The cognac -- well, chances are, he says, Poe was actually intolerant of alcohol, despite the fact that his death often has been attributed to imbibing.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 29, 1999
MOSCOW -- Nearly every day, another grim dispatch arrives from the front. The news tells ominously of one surrender after another, from the volcano-strewn landscape of Kamchatka near the Pacific Ocean to the belching smokestacks of the Ural Mountains, 3,000 miles to the west.The flu is marching across Russia, and newspaper readers are following its path nervously. Here in the capital, a thousand miles west of the Urals, the assault is expected sometime in the next week or so, and Muscovites are throwing up the barricades, desperately trying to protect themselves.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | January 20, 1999
Will someone now leave roses and cognac at his grave?A mystery man who for nearly 50 years left roses and cognac at the grave of Edgar Allan Poe died in December, according to a computer-written note found early yesterday morning at Poe's grave.The note was tucked among three roses and a bottle of Martell's cognac hand-delivered by another mystery man at Poe's grave on his 190th birthday."The gentleman who started the tradition in 1949 died from a prolonged illness this December," says Jeff Jerome, curator of the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 10, 1999
When the menu calls for spiced custard pie, squash the impulse to reach for canned pumpkin. Instead, consider a tart filled with something a bit more posh: acorn, banana, buttercup, butternut, Hubbard, sweetmeat, Tahitian or turban winter squash. All of these have a mellow flavor and fine-grained texture that makes a delicate custard filling.Prepare winter squash the same way you'd cook pumpkin: Cut it into halves or quarters, depending on the size of the squash, and bake it cut-side down in a 350-degree oven until tender (from 40 minutes to 1 hour)
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Darkness has long fallen by the time the cheerful legislators and lobbyists finish celebrating the birthday of a colleague and leave the Maryland Inn. But for Del. James W. Campbell, it's still early enough to get his fix.One more round on the Stairmaster.In a place that always had a reputation for overindulgence -- expense account dinners, receptions laden with rich finger foods and free liquor, late-night cigars and cognac -- a man such as Campbell once stuck out like a teetotaler at a fraternity party.
NEWS
June 12, 1995
Rene Firino Martell, 68, who engineered the $850 million sale of his family's cognac company to Seagram Co. in 1988, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Nice, France. He lived in Cognac, the small southwestern town that his family has dominated for almost three centuries. He became chairman in 1977 and was an eighth-generation descendant of Jean Martell, the wine merchant from the Isle of Jersey who founded the cognac company in 1715. By 1987, Martell, the second-largest cognac brand after Hennesey, was a household name around the world.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1992
Extravagance has its place and dessert is it. Ask chef Curtis Fleharty, executive chef of Neiman Marcus in Chicago, who recently was asked to create the world's most expensive dessert as a possible new entry for the Guinness Book of World Records.Spending more than 150 hours making the spun sugar pieces for a carousel confection, he did not skimp on the ingredients nor spare any cost. Among the liquids used were a 1985 Chateau Petrus costing $340 and a Louis XIII Cognac priced at $768. The carousel's chocolate top and columns were decorated with 22-karat gold leaf.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff WriterStaff Writer | May 24, 1992
Dinner in New York New Yorkers who've never trusted their palates west of the Hudson River are in for a treat when executive chef Michael Gettier offers a taste of the Conservatory at Peabody Court at the James Beard House in Manhattan. Mr. Gettier was invited to present a dinner at the house, part of the James Beard Foundation's "Best Hotel Chefs in America" series, at 7 p.m. Wednesday. (Reservations are still available: Call (212) 627-2308 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Cost is $60 for foundation members, $80 for nonmembers.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 24, 1991
YEREVAN, U.S.S.R. -- For the Soviet vineyards' eerie commingling of Bolshevism and bouquet, Edvard L. Hakopyan, the master of Armenian cognac, bears not only a Hero of Socialist Labor medal but also a great nose.The nose is serving him better than the medal nowadays as the republic of Armenia and the other viniferous bastions of the new political separatism, Moldavia and Georgia, cultivate revenge, sweet and dry, upon President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and replant the thousands of acres of wine grapes that he had plowed under in his temperance drive against Soviet alcoholism in 1985.
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