Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCoffers
IN THE NEWS

Coffers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- While the Democratic Party faces huge debts and mounting legal fees, the Republican Party is collecting millions of dollars to fill its campaign coffers.The Republican National Committee raised more than $20 million in the first four months of 1997, a total that included the year's first million-dollar donation. Richard DeVos, a co-founder of Amway Corp., and his wife contributed $1 million to the RNC in April. Tobacco giant Philip Morris Cos. has given the RNC $270,000.The Democratic National Committee has raised $14.4 million, but still has $16 million in debt from last year's campaign.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
As Anne Arundel school board members discussed efforts to address the achievement gap in the system on Wednesday, they called upon county citizens to not only get involved but to understand that the arduous task needs to be properly funded. The board's action came two days after the County Council struck down its efforts to move budget funds from administration to instruction, citing salary agreements the board struck with the teachers' union. "If you really want to do something for these kids, this is what it's going to cost,'" said board member Eugene Peterson.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
Almost a billion extra dollars are pouring into state government coffers -- enough to buy the Ravens four more football stadiums with money to spare -- and Marylanders have no shortage of ideas for how Gov. Parris N. Glendening should spend the windfall.With apologies to Paul Simon, there must be 50,000 ways to spend the surplus.Buy a new bus system, says environmental activist Dru Schmidt-Perkins.Train budding entrepreneurs how to succeed in business, says Luke Durant, Santa Claus at Mondawmin Mall.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
The Maryland Lottery broke a sales record for the 14 t h consecutive year in fiscal 2011, generating $1.7 billion in sales, the agency said Monday. The lottery contributed $519 million to the state's general fund, an increase of $8.86 million over the last fiscal year, to go toward education, public safety, health and environmental programs. The agency said it was the fourth-largest contributor to the general fund, after sales, income and corporate taxes. Lottery retailers earned commissions of $113.7 million, while prizes totaled more than $1.03 billion.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 14, 2002
Cheer up. The Wizards who made Enron a great company are running the country. The favorite for governor doesn't poll as invincible the closer you get to election. It was ever thus. Essex and Middle River could become truly elegant upscale yachting communities swelling the property tax coffers in Towson. All they need do is evict the current inhabitants. Whatever comes in next is not Yves Saint Laurent's fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 24, 2001
Who knew annual meetings could be so much fun? It was standing room only in the Renaissance Hotel's mezzanine during the cocktail hour of the Baltimore Chamber of Commerce's annual meeting, called "The Good Sports of Baltimore." Some 350 chamber members sipped drinks, munched appetizers and caught up with old friends and new. Then they headed into the ballroom for dinner and a presentation by John Moag, former Maryland Stadium Authority head, on the impact of major league sports on the city and state.
NEWS
April 2, 2007
MARYLAND Methodists' rabbi When Methodists around Baltimore have questions about Jesus' Jewish heritage, they turn to their conference rabbi, Joshua Martin Siegel, who will lead a Passover seder at a Hyattsville congregation Thursday. pg 1a Brush with controversy An assistant secretary of the Department of Natural Resources answers questions about a program that landscaped public land adjacent to his house. His wife wrote the grant approved by one of his employees. pg 1b NATIONAL Campaign coffers swell Campaign officials with Sen. Hillary Clinton have announced that she has raised $26 million for her presidential run and added $10 million from the coffers of her Senate campaign.
NEWS
January 7, 1993
Now that Gov. William Donald Schaefer has made a conciliatory gesture, it is time for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to reciprocate by lining up solidly behind a proposal to double the size of the Baltimore Convention Center. Otherwise, the city could lose millions of dollars each year in desperately needed tax revenue as conventioneers take their business elsewhere. Expanding the facility has become an economic necessity.In the past three years, 33 groups have opted not to come to Baltimore because there's: 1)
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
Former County Councilman Theodore J. Sophocleus, who lost the 1990 county executive's race by the narrowest of margins, is back in the political fray.The 52-year-old Linthicum pharmacist announced Friday that he will run for office in 1994. Sophocleus, a Democrat, said he has not decided what office he will seek."I like county government, certainly," he said. "But we're going to look at all the options. It depends on what the atmosphere is, on who's doing what and what commitment (other politicians)
NEWS
October 25, 1991
When the city leased its golf courses to a non-profit corporation in 1985, it never dreamed it would one day clamor to get money back. After all, the idea was to rid the city of a perennial financial drag; the five city-owned golf courses were losing about $500,000 a year -- a direct drain on the city budget.With some smart management changes, the Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation improved the courses, attracted more golfers, quickly paid back its city loans and began to generate surplus revenues it could plow back into its facilities and programs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
About 60 Corvettes, vintage, new and of every hue, parked four across on a closed-off block of North Chester Street in East Baltimore for several hours Saturday. Members of the Baltimore County Corvette Club had traveled from M&T Bank Stadium with a police escort to the Bea Gaddy Family Center. Each delivered a trunkful of donations, mostly food, for the center's 29th annual Thanksgiving dinner. Cynthia Brooks, Gaddy's daughter and executive director of the outreach center, thanked an exuberant crowd of volunteers and Corvette owners, who have contributed in increasing numbers since 2006.
NEWS
By Neil Bergsman | July 22, 2010
For seven days in August, Maryland shoppers can purchase certain clothing items costing less than $100 without paying the state's 6 percent sales tax. It's not as good a deal as it sounds. A 2007 law established Aug. 8-16 of this year as a "sales-tax holiday" because legislators thought that by now the state would have a budget surplus and could afford the revenue loss. But tough economic times have lasted longer than anyone expected, to the point where what the state is really doing now is giving up money it doesn't have.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
He'd served the force for a third of his life, but tragedy struck Cpl. Duke G. Aaron III in an instant. One July day in 2004, Aaron, an officer with the Maryland Transportation Authority, had just returned to his patrol car after writing a traffic ticket when a speeding motorist — a Maryland man who later tested positive for cocaine — rammed his vehicle from behind. By the end of the day, the burly Aaron, 29, of Pasadena, was dead. It was the sort of news the family of every emergency responder dreads, and the two strangers who visited Jennifer Aaron, his widow, the next day knew there was nothing they could say to make it better.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
Does Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski back President Barack Obama's plan to shut down America's moon-landing program? The future of some local economies could turn on her answer. What the Maryland senator thinks might well affect hundreds of aerospace firms from Florida to Utah that feed off the NASA program, including more than two dozen companies in northern Alabama, where the new moon rocket is being developed. "She's incredibly important," said Shar Hendrick, a leader of Huntsville's aerospace community and former congressional liaison at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center there.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
BETHESDA - -The scene around the first tee at Congressional Country Club Friday was what most envisioned when Tiger Woods announced three years ago that he would be hosting a regular Professional Golf Association tour event over Fourth of July weekend. Fans stood five-deep in most places, 10-deep in others, hoping for a glimpse of the world's best player. But when Woods leaves after Sunday's final round of the AT&T National tournament, big-time golf in Maryland will suffer the latest painful blow.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 29, 2008
A sluggish economy and housing market continued to undercut nearly every source of tax revenue for the state over the past year, with collections falling $73.5 million short of expectations, setting the stage for tighter budgets in the coming years. The declines demonstrate how inextricably tied state government is to the overall economy. A dent in consumer spending, weakened by the economic malaise and household budgets strapped by higher gas and food prices, led to a sales-tax shortfall.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
The Greater Westminster Development Corp. is ready to begin looking for an executive director, Chairman Thomas Ferguson said yesterday."We have a job description for the executive director and will start advertising very shortly," said Mr. Ferguson, who is also president of Carroll County Bank and Trust.The corporation, a quasi-governmental business development group formed over the winter, planned to have a paid executive director from its inception."I'm sure one of your questions is why we're coming right out of the gate with a paid director," Mr. Ferguson told the Westminster City Council during a request for money in March.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
THE AGED, deposed national leader may or may not remember enough to help his defense, if the charges against him actually get to court. But former President of Indohesia Suharto is facing trial for skimming $570 million from the state in 32 years of misrule. Whether, at age 79, after two strokes, he is actually going through the indignity, or will escape on health grounds, doesn't matter much. He is not getting back in power. The establishment will move against the assets of his children and cronies, to the extent that it can find them.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
WASHINGTON -- As Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton wrangle for the Democratic presidential nomination, Republican John McCain is marshaling his resources - with a big assist from President Bush. McCain secured his party's nomination this month after primary victories in Texas and Ohio, followed the next day by an endorsement from the president. Bush and McCain haven't been seen together since, but that doesn't mean the relationship has gone sour. The president is helping his one-time rival, and many other Republicans, by continuing a torrid fundraising pace that has marked his time in office.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Amid gloomy predictions about a slowdown in the housing market, local governments in the Baltimore area have reduced by millions of dollars the amount they expect to collect in taxes from the sale of real estate. Although real estate sales taxes are typically dwarfed by what income and property taxes produce for local government, "this is still important," said Keith Dorsey, Baltimore County budget director. Property transfer taxes are often dedicated to specialized uses, which could be harmed if the money collected continues to decline.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.