Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCoffee Mill
IN THE NEWS

Coffee Mill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
Thomas F. Thompson, who operated a Hampden coffee and tea store for more than a quarter-century, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his Homeland-area home. He was 58. Mr. Thompson opened the Coffee Mill on Chestnut Avenue in 1974. Observers said it was one of the first such businesses to open in a working-class neighborhood that has since drawn restaurants, galleries and other shops. "He had the first boutique store in Hampden, and it was really quite charming," said David Key, owner of Key Coffee and the Daily Grind.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 20, 2003
BALTIMORE, as the natives say, is a good town to die in. Memories here are long. Loyalties run deep. I was reminded of this aspect of local life on a recent afternoon as I listened to a handful of Tom Thompson's old college buddies gather at his bedside and tell stories. Tom, a raconteur who moved easily among this town's blue- blood and blue-collar communities, ran several gourmet coffee operations around town over the past 30 years. He died this week at the age of 58 after a two-year battle with cancer.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1999
Today is the last day of business for the Coffee Mill in Belvedere Square, a bitter end that husband-and-wife owners Rosemary and Tom Thompson did everything to avoid.The Coffee Mill is the last of the original tenants of the North Baltimore shopping center, which opened behind the former Hochschild Kohn department store in 1986.The Thompsons say the closing -- and that of nearly every other retailer and merchant who once did business at the square -- is symbolic of Baltimore's decline in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
Thomas F. Thompson, who operated a Hampden coffee and tea store for more than a quarter-century, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his Homeland-area home. He was 58. Mr. Thompson opened the Coffee Mill on Chestnut Avenue in 1974. Observers said it was one of the first such businesses to open in a working-class neighborhood that has since drawn restaurants, galleries and other shops. "He had the first boutique store in Hampden, and it was really quite charming," said David Key, owner of Key Coffee and the Daily Grind.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 20, 1991
What do you do when you have coffee beans, but no coffee grinder?That is the position I found myself in recently. I wanted my caffeine. The only way I could get it was to somehow pulverize the bag of coffee beans I had in my freezer.I had run out of ground coffee. All I had left was the bag of beans someone had given us as a gift. There was a time in my life, before the kids arrived, when this would not have been a problem. In those days, I had my own personal grinder, and a morning coffee-making ritual.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 12, 1997
Don't call McCormick & Schmick's a chain. "We like to refer to it as a collection," says Packy Longfellow, director of marketing for the Portland, Ore.-based company.If No. 17 in the collection of upscale seafood restaurants opens in the former Inn at Pier 5, it will be by the first quarter of '98, says Bill McCormick, a founder of McCormick & Schmick's. "We'll have something to announce within 30 days," he adds.Most of the other 16 are on the West Coast, but Washington, D.C., has a McCormick & Schmick's that's done very well.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Is there deceit in your coffee? Do your beans have integrity? Or is your cup of joe just one big lie?Coffee lovers are not sparing their favorite drink from the Major Ethical Questions this week as they learn they may be victims of the worst kind of coffee crime: Bean fraud.Although for years they have raved about their expensive Kona coffee -- an exclusive java from the lush mountains of Hawaii -- coffee lovers may have been slurping a regular old cup of mud all along.Last week, one of the nation's biggest distributors of Kona coffee -- a supplier who has served everyone from Starbucks to Baltimore supermarkets -- was indicted on suspicion of secretly replacing his Kona with cheap Central American beans.
NEWS
By Rachel Eisler | June 15, 2001
BOOSTERISM IS the opposite of cool. And there's the challenge. Any city that tries too hard to be its own cheering section may radiate desperation, not desirability. Like every aging, industrial city, Baltimore has its demographic work cut out for it, but attracting committed and creative people has to succeed on their terms, and more importantly, in their language. I don't like bumper stickers, and think slogans are hokey if not hopeless. But here's how I was won over. During an epic red light on Cold Spring Lane, I spotted a small oval on the bumper of the car ahead.
FEATURES
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1994
In the diners of yesteryear, the first decision made in the morning was between pancakes and bacon and eggs. But times change, and for many Americans these days, the big decision is between Sumatra and hazelnut.Welcome to the public well of the 1990s -- the gourmet coffee shop. More and more people are starting the day, ending the evening or just passing the time socializing over a steaming cup of cappuccino.Once a craze identified with San Francisco and Seattle, the new coffee culture has come east.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | September 17, 2003
Here's a chance to be stylish and help out a good cause. With each purchase of its pink retro-looking Model A-9 coffee mill, KitchenAid will donate $10 to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. The donation is part of the Cook for the Cure campaign created by KitchenAid and the foundation to give those with a passion for cooking a way to support the fight against breast cancer. The Model A-9 coffee mill is a replica of the first KitchenAid coffee mill introduced in 1938. It has a glass hopper that holds up to a pound of beans and offers a choice of 16 grind settings.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | September 17, 2003
Here's a chance to be stylish and help out a good cause. With each purchase of its pink retro-looking Model A-9 coffee mill, KitchenAid will donate $10 to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. The donation is part of the Cook for the Cure campaign created by KitchenAid and the foundation to give those with a passion for cooking a way to support the fight against breast cancer. The Model A-9 coffee mill is a replica of the first KitchenAid coffee mill introduced in 1938. It has a glass hopper that holds up to a pound of beans and offers a choice of 16 grind settings.
NEWS
By Rachel Eisler | June 15, 2001
BOOSTERISM IS the opposite of cool. And there's the challenge. Any city that tries too hard to be its own cheering section may radiate desperation, not desirability. Like every aging, industrial city, Baltimore has its demographic work cut out for it, but attracting committed and creative people has to succeed on their terms, and more importantly, in their language. I don't like bumper stickers, and think slogans are hokey if not hopeless. But here's how I was won over. During an epic red light on Cold Spring Lane, I spotted a small oval on the bumper of the car ahead.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1999
Today is the last day of business for the Coffee Mill in Belvedere Square, a bitter end that husband-and-wife owners Rosemary and Tom Thompson did everything to avoid.The Coffee Mill is the last of the original tenants of the North Baltimore shopping center, which opened behind the former Hochschild Kohn department store in 1986.The Thompsons say the closing -- and that of nearly every other retailer and merchant who once did business at the square -- is symbolic of Baltimore's decline in the 1990s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 12, 1997
Don't call McCormick & Schmick's a chain. "We like to refer to it as a collection," says Packy Longfellow, director of marketing for the Portland, Ore.-based company.If No. 17 in the collection of upscale seafood restaurants opens in the former Inn at Pier 5, it will be by the first quarter of '98, says Bill McCormick, a founder of McCormick & Schmick's. "We'll have something to announce within 30 days," he adds.Most of the other 16 are on the West Coast, but Washington, D.C., has a McCormick & Schmick's that's done very well.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 9, 1997
IS IT EVIDENCE of our social isolation that so many people find it so remarkable that strangers still have the capacity to be kind? Are we so infested with the fears of modern life - urban, suburban, even rural - that we actually feel stunned when people go out of their way to do us a favor, unconditionally, with no expectation of material reward?I ask because, during the last four years (and especially in the last few weeks), I've heard dozens of stories about acts of kindness, generosity and honesty, and all of them from people who express surprise - even mild shock - that they could be on the receiving end of such good deeds.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Is there deceit in your coffee? Do your beans have integrity? Or is your cup of joe just one big lie?Coffee lovers are not sparing their favorite drink from the Major Ethical Questions this week as they learn they may be victims of the worst kind of coffee crime: Bean fraud.Although for years they have raved about their expensive Kona coffee -- an exclusive java from the lush mountains of Hawaii -- coffee lovers may have been slurping a regular old cup of mud all along.Last week, one of the nation's biggest distributors of Kona coffee -- a supplier who has served everyone from Starbucks to Baltimore supermarkets -- was indicted on suspicion of secretly replacing his Kona with cheap Central American beans.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 20, 2003
BALTIMORE, as the natives say, is a good town to die in. Memories here are long. Loyalties run deep. I was reminded of this aspect of local life on a recent afternoon as I listened to a handful of Tom Thompson's old college buddies gather at his bedside and tell stories. Tom, a raconteur who moved easily among this town's blue- blood and blue-collar communities, ran several gourmet coffee operations around town over the past 30 years. He died this week at the age of 58 after a two-year battle with cancer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 3, 1996
Since the unexamined life is not worth living, I recently took a long look at the way I make a cup of coffee. I tried to do this with a minimum of pretense and a maximum of common sense. I concentrated on the basics of beans, water and pot.Late one winter afternoon I found myself in the Coffee Mill, in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood, sipping black coffee made from three different pots. The idea was to see how the three different types of filters in the pots affected the flavor of the coffee.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 3, 1996
Since the unexamined life is not worth living, I recently took a long look at the way I make a cup of coffee. I tried to do this with a minimum of pretense and a maximum of common sense. I concentrated on the basics of beans, water and pot.Late one winter afternoon I found myself in the Coffee Mill, in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood, sipping black coffee made from three different pots. The idea was to see how the three different types of filters in the pots affected the flavor of the coffee.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
One could just about hear the shock wave thunder through the Coffee Community this week when Johns Hopkins medical researchers announced their stunning discovery: caffeine is a drug.All over Baltimore, people looked up from their cappuccinos, their lattes and 7-Eleven 20-ounce coffees and uttered a collective: "NO KIDDING, DR. BONEHEAD. WHY DO YOU THINK WE DRINK IT?""Can't they tell us something we don't know?" asks Beth Pulcinella, who works the counter at The Coffee Mill in Belvedere Square Market.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.