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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 21, 2001
Deborah Cogan, an owner of Spoons Coffee House and Roastery at 24 E. Cross St., knows her coffee. The place specializes in organic and shade-grown coffees from small farms, and the beans are roasted on the premises. Serious coffee drinkers should be very happy here, particularly as Spoons earlier this year added breakfast and lunch to the mix. Unlike some coffee shops that have only pastries or bagels, Spoons offers a full breakfast of eggs, pancakes, french toast and the like starting at 7 a.m. every day. Lunch at the moment consists only of five sandwiches; but panini, soup and salads are soon to be added to the menu.
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svanessen2@hotmail.com | November 5, 2013
The Rev. Mary Gaut has been accepted as a 2014 fellow by GreenFaith, an interfaith organization promoting environmental stewardship. The GreenFaith website says "the Fellowship Program is the first comprehensive education and training program in the US to prepare lay and ordained leaders from diverse religious traditions for religiously based environmental leadership. The Fellowship curriculum is designed to integrate historical perspectives, scientific information, socio-economic considerations, religious, ethical, spiritual and practical dimensions.
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NEWS
By Staff report | August 21, 1991
Tired of shelling out more and more dollars for concert tickets and driving many miles to hear those sounds?Relax. The music plays at8 p.m. Saturday almost in your own backyard.And you can forget your budget woes: The $4 admission won't breakyour bank.Come to the Coffee House, where several local artists perform their favorite folk tunes under the stars at the Carroll County Farm Museum.Sponsored by the Carroll County Arts Council, the evening promises refreshments, entertainment and camaraderie.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Sunday, Jan. 20 Celebration The 28th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Celebration will be held at Howard Community College's Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia. The reception takes place at 2 p.m., and the program begins at 3 p.m. The celebration is free to the public, but attendees are asked to bring a canned food item to support the Howard County Food Bank. Attendees will have the opportunity to sign up for volunteer opportunities.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
The aroma of brewing coffee can mean welcome in any language. It fills the air, beckoning visitors to sit and sip for a spell.Starting today those familiar, flavorful scents will greet visitors to the Serrv International Gift Shop in New Windsor. A small corner of the shop is now a coffee house, where shoppers can take a break and leisurely savor a steaming cup of freshly ground gourmet coffee.A few sets of tables and chairs surround a coffee bar and encourage buyers to linger over several flavorful brews.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
For 6 1/2 years, patients at Springfield Hospital Center have gathered on Sundays at the coffee house to socialize over coffee, hot dogs, bagels and candy.There, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., free from staff supervision, patients at the state hospital for the mentally ill can chat, listen to music or watch football.But the coffee house, which attracts 40 to 60 customers a week, may be closing its doors soon.The volunteers from Springfield's Citizen Advisory Board, who run the coffee house, recently told Springfield's acting superintendent, Paula Langmead, that they can't continue to organize the weekly event.
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | April 16, 1995
25 Years Ago (week of April 5-11, 1970)* The Howard County Council, sitting as the Board of License Commissioners, heard a petition for a Class A beer license for Joe Foder of Savage. It would be that town's first liquor license since the repeal of Prohibition.* Controversy raged in Oakland Mills over the proximity of a new coffee house, "It's Open," in the Oakland Mills Teen Center. Residents complained that programs inappropriate for young teens were being presented at the coffee house.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
For five years, folk musicians and fans here have played and heard their kind of music at the Coffee House.Nostalgic and new tunes filled the auditorium of the Carroll County Historical Society one Saturday evening a month as several musicians volunteered their time and talent, often auditioning a new song.Admission was $3 per person and usually covered the evening's expenses, including $75 to rent the society's auditorium.As the event grew in popularity, about 60 to 80 people came regularly to the "listening place," said Roger Himler, singer and guitarist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2003
NOW OR NEVER The Home Again! Home Again! Jiggity Jog 5K Run / Walk is set for Saturday. The $25 registration fee will benefit Earl's Place Transitional Housing Program, an initiative targeted at helping previously homeless males. The race starts at 9 a.m. in Patterson Park at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center, at 2601 E. Baltimore St. For more information, call 410-377-8882 or visit www.charmcityrun.com. -- Aron Davidowitz COMING UP Elvis may not be everywhere, but his likeness abounds at Porters Coffee House.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 1, 1992
JERUSALEM -- A mudslide from a centuries-old cemetery collapsed the roof of a Palestinian coffee house yesterday, killing at least six men and wounding 15 others. An estimated 30 more were buried beneath the rubble and feared dead.Palestinian youths and Israeli paramilitary border police worked shoulder-to-shoulder to extricate the dead and injured. A steady drizzle of rain complicated the rescue efforts.The disaster occurred at the Al Rawdah Cafe just outside the ancient walled Old City in Arab East Jerusalem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
Remember the gourmet cafe? That was what they called those places that put chutney on your turkey sandwich. They've come back, but we don't call them gourmet anymore. Artifact Coffee, the new project from the Woodberry Kitchen , lies just across the Light Rail tracks in Hampden. The cafe, which opened in June, is a partnership between Spike Gjerde and Allie Caran, Woodberry's head barista, who is Artifact's general manager. Caran's efforts to bring a serious coffee program to Woodberry have been widely praised.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | July 7, 2012
For the past six years, the building at 6228 Sykesvillle Road (Route 32), in Eldersburg, once known as Nathan Henry's Restaurant, has stood empty. But it hasn't been forgotten. The nondenominational Journey Church Community has been planning to turn the site into the Ugly Mug, which organizers describe as a not-for-profit coffee/cafe/concert house for the community, especially young adults. After six years of fundraising, campaigns, setbacks and road blocks, proponents say the goal is still alive - and in fact may be close to reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
A fourth movie screen is coming to Hampden's Rotunda Cinemas. The additional screen, which will accommodate an audience of just over 100, should be ready by early May, said Ira Miller, a veteran exhibitor who has been operating the theater since May 2009. He signed the agreement with the mall's owners, New Jersey-based Hekemian & Co., earlier this week, he said. "We finally made the deal and signed it," said Miller, who has been talking about adding a fourth screen for over a year.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 10, 2009
Every neighborhood needs something like the Pure Wine Cafe (8210 Main St., 410-480-5037, PureWineCafe.com). Now Ellicott City has one, in the space where Annabell's Fine Wine used to be. Pure Wine is part wine bar and part coffee house, a place to "meet your friends and have some small plates," as co-owner P. J. Strain put it. Since I first wrote about the place at the beginning of the year, the concept has changed somewhat. Instead of a full menu, chef Kevin Brothers, formerly at Great Sage in Clarksville, offers a short selection of dishes that change weekly.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2008
Rachel Franklin brings musical insight and passion to her jazz playing and her pre-concert lectures at the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. The musicologist has prepared symphony audiences in pre-concert lectures since 1996. Franklin provides a deeper understanding of the music, and the lectures proved so popular that they outgrew Maryland Hall meeting rooms and moved to the main auditorium two seasons ago. Some lucky ASO concertgoers heard Franklin, a concert pianist, at the 2006 chamber music program she created in the first collaboration between the symphony and St. John's Mitchell Gallery, combining visual art with classical music selections.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2004
Annapolis lore has it that when victorious Gen. George Washington resigned his commission here one December day in 1783, he cut through a certain alley from the State House to Mann's, his hotel, and then marked the occasion with friends at the popular Coffee House. Mann's and the Coffee House are long gone, but the alley that the nation's first president most likely took, Chancery Lane, is still a well-walked, sloping footpath between Annapolis' State Circle and Main Street. Not all the dozen or so named alleys in Annapolis glow with grand moments in American history.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1992
Inside what is now a battered brick shell at Thames and South Bond streets, flagons once clanked as prominent gentlemen debated the issues of the day. Windows that are now blocked up once afforded a view of busy Fells Point in its 18th century heyday as Baltimore's deep-water port.What appears today as an outpost of urban blight is one of the last of the LondonCoffee House taverns that were common to Eastern seaport cities.Next door, as undistinguished in its decline, is a larger brick building that shipwright George Wells built as a home about 1779.
NEWS
August 27, 2003
YOU HAVE heard the claims: Coffee prevents grumpiness and may reduce gallstones, Parkinson's disease, even suicides. But how about this one: Coffee heals ailing neighborhoods? This notion is winning wide acceptance among urban thinkers. At a recent Harvard seminar, the appearance of coffee shops was cited as one of the best gauges of neighborhood revival. And there's proof right here in Baltimore. Take Pigtown, a struggling neighborhood that derives its name from the bygone times when pigs ran through its streets on their way to slaughterhouses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2003
NOW OR NEVER The Home Again! Home Again! Jiggity Jog 5K Run / Walk is set for Saturday. The $25 registration fee will benefit Earl's Place Transitional Housing Program, an initiative targeted at helping previously homeless males. The race starts at 9 a.m. in Patterson Park at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center, at 2601 E. Baltimore St. For more information, call 410-377-8882 or visit www.charmcityrun.com. -- Aron Davidowitz COMING UP Elvis may not be everywhere, but his likeness abounds at Porters Coffee House.
NEWS
August 27, 2003
YOU HAVE heard the claims: Coffee prevents grumpiness and may reduce gallstones, Parkinson's disease, even suicides. But how about this one: Coffee heals ailing neighborhoods? This notion is winning wide acceptance among urban thinkers. At a recent Harvard seminar, the appearance of coffee shops was cited as one of the best gauges of neighborhood revival. And there's proof right here in Baltimore. Take Pigtown, a struggling neighborhood that derives its name from the bygone times when pigs ran through its streets on their way to slaughterhouses.
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