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By Frank Wu and Frank Wu,Special to the Sun | January 11, 2004
I disagree. Whether by personality or profession, I am compelled to take exception. Growing up, I liked adults much better than I did other children, thanks to their superior arguments. Now, as a law professor, I teach people how to sue. I disagree with myself, too. I am not so sure I should be so contrary. Yet our diverse democracy works at its best -- indeed, works at all -- only through robust discussion. In discussion, the most important question, to which of course there can be no right answer, is "Why?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
With a loaded title and a heavy foot in ancient Greek mythology, Bob Bartlett's new play "Bareback Ink" offers an intriguing take on sexual attraction and coercion, genuine and forced relationships, alienation and fear. Iron Crow Theatre Company has given the work a tense, thoughtful staging at JHU's tucked-away Swirnow Theatre, directed by Ryan Clark and designed by Heather Mork. It may not persuade you that Bartlett has penned a masterpiece, but the combination of solid acting and production values (most notably the atmospheric contributions from lighting designer Alec Lawson and sound designer Jessye Black)
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NEWS
January 30, 1993
Norplant, the five-year contraceptive implant, has been used by almost 2 million women around the world -- by choice. But the safety, convenience and reliability that have made it popular also present the temptation to turn choice into coercion. Almost from the moment Norplant was approved for use in this country in 1990, the suggestion has been raised from time to time that government consider requiring certain women to use the device.In his State of the State address last month, Gov. William Donald Schaefer added the latest chorus by suggesting that his new Welfare Policy Commission take a look at all the possible solutions, extreme or not, to reduce the number of children being born to women and girls who are not able to take care of them.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 23, 2013
Human nature frequently disproves theories. Conventional wisdom, for example, says that open office space plans with workers grouped like cattle encourage creativity and collaboration. But study after study shows that people are more inventive, productive and healthy with more privacy. Susan Cain writes about this eloquently in "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking. " But examples are legion of experience trumping ideology. Would that legislators, like state Sen. Jamie Raskin, keep this in mind when trying to help people.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
'Coercion' is just totalitarian torture Richard Saccone pooh-poohs all this needless talk about "torture" ("Confusing coercion with torture," Commentary, April 22). He speaks dismissively of water-boarding and of keeping "a terrorist awake 15 minutes past his bedtime." Mr. Saccone is either intentionally reading the torture memos selectively or confused about the difference between democracy and totalitarianism. Consider the following chilling parallels. In Stalinist Russia, sleep deprivation was regularly deployed against political prisoners.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff researcher Robert Gee contributed to this article | March 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress yesterday refused requests by the NAACP and the Congressional Black Caucus for an independent review of charges that Army investigators at Aberdeen Proving Ground tried to pressure female trainees to make false rape charges.Rep. Steve Buyer, an Indiana Republican who chairs the military personnel subcommittee, said he saw no need for a review outside the Army -- a view echoed by other members of the House National Security Committee."We do not want to jeopardize any ongoing investigations," Buyer, who heads a task force looking into sexual harassment and misconduct in all the military services, said of the sexual misconduct probe at an Aberdeen school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
With a loaded title and a heavy foot in ancient Greek mythology, Bob Bartlett's new play "Bareback Ink" offers an intriguing take on sexual attraction and coercion, genuine and forced relationships, alienation and fear. Iron Crow Theatre Company has given the work a tense, thoughtful staging at JHU's tucked-away Swirnow Theatre, directed by Ryan Clark and designed by Heather Mork. It may not persuade you that Bartlett has penned a masterpiece, but the combination of solid acting and production values (most notably the atmospheric contributions from lighting designer Alec Lawson and sound designer Jessye Black)
NEWS
January 28, 2001
Gilchrest was right to oppose canal dredging boondoggle Maryland and U.S. taxpayers owe Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest a debt of gratitude for leading efforts to prevent $40 million from being wasted on an U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to deepen the C&D Canal in eastern Maryland ("C&D Canal dredging put on hold" Jan. 23). Where other members of Congress would only see pork for their district, Mr. Gilchrest asked questions to ensure taxpayers were getting a fair deal. Those questions led to more questions, until it became apparent that deepening the C&D Canal would be a giant boondoggle.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. LEVY | March 8, 1998
Good and bad news from Microsoft hearings last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Microsoft Corp., its allies and its rivals agree that there's no need for further antitrust legislation tailored specifically for high-tech industries. That's the good news. But it leaves the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division with a large role to play whenever it perceives that a company has acquired "too much" market power and is behaving in an "anti-competitive" manner. That's the bad news.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As the first presidential visit to China in nearly a decade opens this week, the Asian colossus is poised to play a pivotal part in some of the world's most perilous politics, but many Americans worry which way it will turn.Whether it's a potentially disastrous Indo-Pakistani nuclear race, hair-trigger tension on the Korean Peninsula or Asia's turbulent finances, China is crucial to stabilizing an area stretching from the Himalayas far into the Pacific."The role China chooses to play will powerfully shape the next century," President Clinton asserted recently, making the case for his policy of seeking a "strategic partnership" with the most populous nation.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
'Coercion' is just totalitarian torture Richard Saccone pooh-poohs all this needless talk about "torture" ("Confusing coercion with torture," Commentary, April 22). He speaks dismissively of water-boarding and of keeping "a terrorist awake 15 minutes past his bedtime." Mr. Saccone is either intentionally reading the torture memos selectively or confused about the difference between democracy and totalitarianism. Consider the following chilling parallels. In Stalinist Russia, sleep deprivation was regularly deployed against political prisoners.
NEWS
By Richard Saccone | April 22, 2009
Public officials, media outlets and members of the public who use the words torture and coercion interchangeably are making a huge mistake - one that could threaten our safety and security. Formerly top-secret documents declassified recently by the Obama administration describe in detail 10 interrogation techniques, including the now-infamous water-boarding. This has led to the unfortunate branding of all coercive techniques as torture. Among the enhanced techniques listed were the "attention grab" and the "facial hold."
NEWS
By Richard Saccone | November 5, 2007
LATROBE, Pa. -- The Senate Judiciary Committee is to vote tomorrow on the nomination of Michael B. Mukasey to be attorney general, and some senators say they won't confirm him unless he defines waterboarding as torture. Perhaps Mr. Mukasey should have asked the senators to define torture first. Until they clarify the term, it is dangerous to discuss specific techniques used in interrogation. A usable definition has been blurred by those who insist on confusing the terms "coercive interrogation" and "torture."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,sun reporter | January 18, 2007
Three Baltimore sex crimes investigators testified yesterday in the rape trial of a city officer and corroborated several key details of the accuser's story. Officer Jemini Jones, 29, is accused of coercing a woman to have sex in exchange for freedom from drug charges, an encounter she says took place Dec. 27, 2005, at the Southwestern District police station house. The woman and her younger female friend were taken in handcuffs to the station after Jones and two other officers caught them in a parked car with a marijuana-filled cigar known as a blunt.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,sun reporter | January 12, 2007
In the opening of a trial that promises a glimpse into a rogue specialized Baltimore police unit, a woman testified yesterday that an officer coerced her into sex in exchange for freedom from drug charges. Crying throughout much of her testimony, the woman said Officer Jemini Jones crudely threatened to send her to jail -- not only for the marijuana she had been arrested with, but also for possessing other drugs. The woman's rape claim in December 2005 sparked a wider internal police review of the Southwestern District "flex squad," a small group of officers who worked mostly undercover in drug investigations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Wu and Frank Wu,Special to the Sun | January 11, 2004
I disagree. Whether by personality or profession, I am compelled to take exception. Growing up, I liked adults much better than I did other children, thanks to their superior arguments. Now, as a law professor, I teach people how to sue. I disagree with myself, too. I am not so sure I should be so contrary. Yet our diverse democracy works at its best -- indeed, works at all -- only through robust discussion. In discussion, the most important question, to which of course there can be no right answer, is "Why?"
NEWS
By Richard Saccone | April 22, 2009
Public officials, media outlets and members of the public who use the words torture and coercion interchangeably are making a huge mistake - one that could threaten our safety and security. Formerly top-secret documents declassified recently by the Obama administration describe in detail 10 interrogation techniques, including the now-infamous water-boarding. This has led to the unfortunate branding of all coercive techniques as torture. Among the enhanced techniques listed were the "attention grab" and the "facial hold."
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Few American books published in 1909 are still in print. One of them has never in 87 years been out of print and its influence on American governance goes marching on. Herbert Croly's ''The Promise of American Life,'' a manifesto for the Progressive movement, is this century's most influential book on American politics, and now it is again newsworthy.It is because last year Lamar Alexander co-edited (with Chester Finn), and contributed to, a collection of essays published by the Hudson Institute.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
For Valerie Shefik, the effort to adopt a second Marshallese child led to what she calls one of the most heart-wrenching experiences of her life. Valerie, 44, and her husband, Robert, 46, first adopted a Marshallese child in late 1997 through the TLC Adoption Agency in Washington state. The boy's adoption was approved by the Arizona courts and went smoothly. Nearly three years later, the Scottsdale, Ariz., couple were exploring the possibility of another adoption when Valerie Shefik got a call from TLC around Thanksgiving, telling her that a 7-year-old Marshallese girl "had to be placed quickly."
TOPIC
By Rick Rockwell and Kristin Neubauer | July 29, 2001
PRESIDENT Bush likes to remind the foreign policy establishment that his ideas are good for business. He believes, as he argued on behalf of China's inclusion in the World Trade Organization, that "free trade supports and sustains freedom in all its forms." This simple sloganeering often sells many on the idea that commerce creates democracy. The intertwining of these concepts is an effective way to silence critics of policies that have little to do with democracy but a lot to do with economic power.
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