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By Mary Harris Russell and Mary Harris Russell,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2005
The Sphere of Secrets By Catherine Fisher. Greenwillow. $16.99. Ages 11-14 years. Starting with the second book of this series would be difficult. If you have, however, read The Oracle Betrayed (or after you have), Book 2 continues the fast turns of plot and character. It combines some aspects of the mythologies of ancient Greece and Egypt, with an Oracle, a Speaker for the oracle, and a child, Archon, ruling over a kingdom of political intrigue and mercantile power. Mirany, a young attendant to the Speaker, and the one through whom the divinity is actually speaking, seeks an end to the intrigue.
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NEWS
May 30, 2008
JOSEPH PEVNEY, 96 JERRY C. BEGAY, 83 Navajo code talker Jerry C. Begay, a Navajo code talker who helped confound the Japanese during World War II and was awarded a Congressional Silver Medal, died Monday in Albuquerque, N.M. No cause of death was given. The code talkers were an elite group of Navajo Marines who transmitted radio messages during the war in a coded version of their native language. The codes were never cracked by enemy forces; the talkers' existence was a military secret for decades after the war ended.
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NEWS
May 30, 2008
JOSEPH PEVNEY, 96 JERRY C. BEGAY, 83 Navajo code talker Jerry C. Begay, a Navajo code talker who helped confound the Japanese during World War II and was awarded a Congressional Silver Medal, died Monday in Albuquerque, N.M. No cause of death was given. The code talkers were an elite group of Navajo Marines who transmitted radio messages during the war in a coded version of their native language. The codes were never cracked by enemy forces; the talkers' existence was a military secret for decades after the war ended.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
Kwanik Kenneth Paik, photojournalist, editor Kwanik Kenneth Paik, an award-winning photojournalist who later became an editor at The Sun and The Evening Sun, and a newspaper columnist, died of acute myelogenous leukemia Nov. 27 in Los Angeles. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Mr. Paik immigrated to the United States in 1963, received a graduate degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and embarked on a career that took him around the world. After working in the photo and graphic departments at newspapers in Kansas and Florida, he became photo director at the Sunpapers in 1983 and later became The Evening Sun's assistant managing editor for news.
FEATURES
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2002
Don't be fooled by the ads for director John Woo's new World War II movie, Windtalkers. The star of the movie isn't Nicolas Cage or Christian Slater. Or the multimillion-dollar special effects employed for dramatic battle scenes. Or even the flag-waving, feel-good patriotism so coveted by post-Sept. 11 American moviegoers. No, the star of Windtalkers, which opened Friday, is an ancient language -- gorgeously complex, maddeningly impenetrable to non-native speakers -- without which America might not have won the war. It's Navajo.
NEWS
October 2, 2000
Frank Wills, 52, the Watergate security guard who discovered the 1972 break-in that led to President Richard M. Nixon's resignation, died Wednesday in Augusta, Ga. No cause of death was given, but friends of the family told the Augusta Chronicle that he suffered a brain tumor and had been ill for several months. Mr. Wills' discovery on the midnight shift at the Washington hotel-office complex thrust him briefly into the spotlight. Early on June 17, 1972, Mr. Wills found a piece of gray tape over a door latch leading into the Watergate complex.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 14, 2002
Windtalkers is a Second World War melodrama about a broken soul. But it strains to be a heroic saga about racial healing under fire. Director John Woo's desire to make this movie a true epic occasionally clicks with his eloquent images of Navajos serving as U.S. Marines and triggers an unshakable potency. Too bad the balance is way off. The casting of Nicolas Cage as a Marine corporal named Enders pushes it toward operatic melancholy from the outset. Only semi-recovered from the Japanese massacre of his squad on the Solomon Islands when he's assigned to protect a Navajo code talker, Yahzee (Adam Beach)
NEWS
By The Arizona Republic | March 13, 1995
FORT DEFIANCE, Ariz. -- Now that Kenji Kawano's photos of aging Navajo code talkers have been exhibited in his native Japan, a growing number of young Japanese are knocking on his door here on the reservation.For almost 20 years, Mr. Kawa- no's work in the land of the Navajos was ignored by his countrymen. But the story of his long obsession with his nation's former enemies -- employed by the U.S. Marine Corps as a kind of secret weapon during World War II -- has been appearing on Tokyo television and in Japanese magazines, making him better known.
NEWS
August 25, 2004
Frank Sanache, 86, the last of the "code talkers" from the Meskwaki Indian tribe, died Saturday in Tama, Iowa. Mr. Sanache was among the "Elite Eight," a group of Meskwakis trained to use their language as a secret code during World War II. The Meskwaki were among 18 tribes that contributed code talkers during the war. Their achievements went largely unnoticed because the code was classified until 1968. Twenty-nine original Navajo code talkers were presented with the Congressional Gold Medal by President Bush in 2001.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
Kwanik Kenneth Paik, photojournalist, editor Kwanik Kenneth Paik, an award-winning photojournalist who later became an editor at The Sun and The Evening Sun, and a newspaper columnist, died of acute myelogenous leukemia Nov. 27 in Los Angeles. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Mr. Paik immigrated to the United States in 1963, received a graduate degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and embarked on a career that took him around the world. After working in the photo and graphic departments at newspapers in Kansas and Florida, he became photo director at the Sunpapers in 1983 and later became The Evening Sun's assistant managing editor for news.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
Myron Floren, 85, an accordion player who entertained generations of television viewers on The Lawrence Welk Show, died of cancer Saturday at his Rolling Hills Estates, Calif., home. A consummate musician versed in styles from polka to Bach, he joined Mr. Welk's band in 1950 and stayed on until the television show ended in 1982. More recently, he performed at music festivals around the country. The orchestra, which also included saxophonist Dick Dale and singer Jim Roberts, was famous for bouncing, effervescent dance music that Mr. Welk began playing as a young man in his native North Dakota.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Harris Russell and Mary Harris Russell,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2005
The Sphere of Secrets By Catherine Fisher. Greenwillow. $16.99. Ages 11-14 years. Starting with the second book of this series would be difficult. If you have, however, read The Oracle Betrayed (or after you have), Book 2 continues the fast turns of plot and character. It combines some aspects of the mythologies of ancient Greece and Egypt, with an Oracle, a Speaker for the oracle, and a child, Archon, ruling over a kingdom of political intrigue and mercantile power. Mirany, a young attendant to the Speaker, and the one through whom the divinity is actually speaking, seeks an end to the intrigue.
FEATURES
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2002
Don't be fooled by the ads for director John Woo's new World War II movie, Windtalkers. The star of the movie isn't Nicolas Cage or Christian Slater. Or the multimillion-dollar special effects employed for dramatic battle scenes. Or even the flag-waving, feel-good patriotism so coveted by post-Sept. 11 American moviegoers. No, the star of Windtalkers, which opened Friday, is an ancient language -- gorgeously complex, maddeningly impenetrable to non-native speakers -- without which America might not have won the war. It's Navajo.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 14, 2002
Windtalkers is a Second World War melodrama about a broken soul. But it strains to be a heroic saga about racial healing under fire. Director John Woo's desire to make this movie a true epic occasionally clicks with his eloquent images of Navajos serving as U.S. Marines and triggers an unshakable potency. Too bad the balance is way off. The casting of Nicolas Cage as a Marine corporal named Enders pushes it toward operatic melancholy from the outset. Only semi-recovered from the Japanese massacre of his squad on the Solomon Islands when he's assigned to protect a Navajo code talker, Yahzee (Adam Beach)
NEWS
October 2, 2000
Frank Wills, 52, the Watergate security guard who discovered the 1972 break-in that led to President Richard M. Nixon's resignation, died Wednesday in Augusta, Ga. No cause of death was given, but friends of the family told the Augusta Chronicle that he suffered a brain tumor and had been ill for several months. Mr. Wills' discovery on the midnight shift at the Washington hotel-office complex thrust him briefly into the spotlight. Early on June 17, 1972, Mr. Wills found a piece of gray tape over a door latch leading into the Watergate complex.
NEWS
By The Arizona Republic | March 13, 1995
FORT DEFIANCE, Ariz. -- Now that Kenji Kawano's photos of aging Navajo code talkers have been exhibited in his native Japan, a growing number of young Japanese are knocking on his door here on the reservation.For almost 20 years, Mr. Kawa- no's work in the land of the Navajos was ignored by his countrymen. But the story of his long obsession with his nation's former enemies -- employed by the U.S. Marine Corps as a kind of secret weapon during World War II -- has been appearing on Tokyo television and in Japanese magazines, making him better known.
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