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Code Red

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By Meredith Cohn and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 20, 2010
With temperatures rising and the potential danger to residents, the Baltimore City Interim Health Commissioner Olivia D. Farrow declared Sunday a Code Red Heat Alert Day. She recommended that residents avoid outdoor activities and, if necessary, visit one of the city's emergency cooling centers offering cool air, water and ice. "We want to encourage residents to check frequently on those who are medically frail and our seniors, especially those who...
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The first significant stretch of heat this year already has some residents yearning for the cooler days of early spring, but they'll have to wait until the end of the week for some relief. Temperatures in downtown Baltimore reached 95 degrees Tuesday, which was notably above the mid-80s weather that's typical this time of year, according to the National Weather Service. The all-time high for June 17 was 96 degrees in 1939. The Tuesday high at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, where records are measured now, was 94. Kurt Miller, wearing a dress shirt and trousers, cursed the heat while as he walked through downtown Baltimore on his lunch break.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Sixty-five people were treated for heat-related illness at Baltimore's African American Festival over the weekend, as city health officials declared Sunday the first Code Red heat alert day of 2013. The heat index topped 104 degrees Sunday, with temperatures in the high 90s combined with humidity. National Weather Service meteorologist Calvin Meadows said the next few days are forecast to have high temperatures in the low 90s and high 80s, and said Sunday's heat was due to a "Bermuda high," in which hot, moist air from the South is blown into the Mid-Atlantic.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Baltimore City and Baltimore County public schools closed two hours early Wednesday because of the heat, so all games are postponed and all practices are canceled. Also, with Howard County experiencing a Code Red heat index, all outside athletic events in the jurisdiction have been canceled Wednesday. Because some schools in both Baltimore City and Baltimore County do not have air conditioning, officials close schools when the heat index rises into the upper 90s. The temperature is expected to rise into the mid-90s this afternoon and the heat index had already jumped over 100 by noon.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 20, 2001
Smog in metropolitan Baltimore didn't quite reach the unhealthy levels meteorologists had predicted yesterday, but it came close. And it could get there today. Yesterday's 90-degree temperatures and clear skies created perfect conditions for ozone levels that can cause breathing problems for some. But the state's air-quality monitoring stations in Baltimore and Harford counties, which usually have the highest readings, peaked just short of the 125 parts per billion that mark "code red," or unhealthful conditions.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
The air pollution that Marylanders created yesterday will come back to irritate them today, meteorologists said, predicting "code red" smog for the Baltimore area. Ground-level ozone, the main ingredient in smog, is expected to reach levels that can cause breathing problems in children, the elderly, and those with heart or lung problems. People in those high-risk groups should limit time outdoors today, and healthy adults should limit strenuous outdoor work, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
For the first time this year, the Baltimore area is in for a three- or four-day stretch of air pollution high enough to be unhealthy for everyone, according to forecasters at the University of Maryland and the Maryland Department of the Environment. "Code red" levels of ozone pollution were recorded at air monitors in Essex, Edgewood and Suitland late yesterday. Forecasters said that by early afternoon today, the entire metropolitan area will reach code red conditions for ozone. Pollution will stay high at least through tomorrow, forecasters predict.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
Heat and humidity have prompted the Maryland Department of the Environment to issue a Code Red ozone alert for the second straight day today, when the heat index is expected to hit 105 to 106 degrees by this afternoon.Yesterday's temperature in Baltimore reached 95 degrees about p.m. at the Maryland Science Center in the Inner Harbor, a reading that didn't shatter any records. The local record for June 25 was recorded a year ago at 99 degrees.Officials said that high temperatures, bright sun and pollutants -- primarily car exhaust -- result in unhealthy air. A Code Red alert is issued when smog particles reach more than 125 parts per billion, high enough to violate a federal anti-pollution law and threaten the health of children, the elderly and those with heart and breathing problems.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Yesterday's heat brought an unwanted guest to Maryland for the first time this year - really bad air. State environmental officials issued their first Code Red ozone alert yesterday and said they might issue similar warnings today and tomorrow. Code Red means air that can cause burning eyes, coughing and chest pains, even in healthy people. It might also increase children's asthma risk. Experts recommend staying indoors as much as possible, refueling cars after dark, avoiding outdoor exercise and minimizing the use of gasoline-powered engines.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | July 20, 2003
Because it was a Code Red day, and extremely hot as well, Jessica Clements and her fiance, Josh Itzoe, had already delayed their run until after the sun set and the air was less polluted. Usually, the Baltimore couple can easily run five or six miles around the Inner Harbor. On this steamy summer night, though, they felt "out of sorts" after three miles and quit early. "Both of us were commenting on how we felt dehydrated ... and how difficult it was to breathe," says Clements, a 24-year-old public relations specialist at Union Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Sixty-five people were treated for heat-related illness at Baltimore's African American Festival over the weekend, as city health officials declared Sunday the first Code Red heat alert day of 2013. The heat index topped 104 degrees Sunday, with temperatures in the high 90s combined with humidity. National Weather Service meteorologist Calvin Meadows said the next few days are forecast to have high temperatures in the low 90s and high 80s, and said Sunday's heat was due to a "Bermuda high," in which hot, moist air from the South is blown into the Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
The Code Red Heat Alert in the city has been extended through Friday, meaning cooling centers will be open with free water and cool air. The National Weather Service said the high could reach 96 with heat index up to 108 in some areas. There's a 60 percent chance of rain and possible thunderstorms. Temperatures don't get cooler until Sunday, with a forecasted high of 89.      
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 5, 2012
Summer's off to a smoggy start in Maryland and across the country, it seems. Since the first official day of summer June 20, there have been nine days when ozone pollution made the air unhealthful for at least some Marylanders to breathe, according to Clean Air Partners , which publishes air-quality forecasts.  In that period, the Baltimore metro area has seen six days bad enough to pose problems either for sensitive individuals or everyone....
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 20, 2012
Maryland health officials have activated a state heat emergency plan, and some counties have followed suit, with temperatures already topping 90 degrees by 11 a.m. Wednesday. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is warning residents to be wary of heat-related illnesses like heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Heat stroke symptoms include  dry red skin, convulsions, disorientation, delirium and coma. Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat stroke and can cause  extreme weakness, muscle cramps, nausea, or headache.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
Summer arrived in Maryland Monday with temperatures already well into the 90s, and forecasters advised residents and public health officials to expect the heat, humidity and bad air quality to persist all week with sweltering numbers more typical of mid-July. Health authorities grappling with the first extended heat wave of the year stood ready to reopen cooling centers in Baltimore. The power company braced for rising demand as air conditioners spun up across the region. And anyone who had to be outdoors just sweated it out and wished for something better.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 20, 2010
With temperatures rising and the potential danger to residents, the Baltimore City Interim Health Commissioner Olivia D. Farrow declared Sunday a Code Red Heat Alert Day. She recommended that residents avoid outdoor activities and, if necessary, visit one of the city's emergency cooling centers offering cool air, water and ice. "We want to encourage residents to check frequently on those who are medically frail and our seniors, especially those who...
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Kris Antonelli, Stephen Henderson and Erika D. Peterman contributed to this article | November 24, 1998
The principal's announcement was short and blunt: "We have a code red in the auditorium. A code red in the auditorium."With that, the classroom doors of Owings Mills High School slammed shut. Students moved away from windows. Administrators hurried to the school's command post. Owings Mills High was in a lockdown.Responding to last year's spate of shootings at schools nationwide, Owings Mills held its first "code red" drill yesterday -- a precursor to what likely will become a standard safety practice for schools throughout Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 10, 2009
With some of the highest temperatures of the summer predicted through Tuesday, Baltimore city's health department issued the year's first Code Red Heat Alert and announced Sunday that the city will open emergency cooling centers and provide free bus passes to help residents seek shelter from the heat. Interim Health Commissioner Olivia D. Farrow declared the alert after the National Weather Service forecast a potentially hazardous combination of high temperatures and humidity for the next two days.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Summer doesn't arrive officially until the solstice at 7:29 Monday morning. But forecasters say the summer's first weeklong stretch of 90-degree heat and high humidity is set to begin this weekend. And that has spurred Baltimore health authorities to roll out this summer's plans to provide heat relief for the city's most vulnerable residents. "High temperatures can be lethal, especially for our most isolated, vulnerable residents," said Robert Maloney, director of the city's Office of Emergency Management.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 10, 2009
With some of the highest temperatures of the summer predicted through Tuesday, Baltimore city's health department issued the year's first Code Red Heat Alert and announced Sunday that the city will open emergency cooling centers and provide free bus passes to help residents seek shelter from the heat. Interim Health Commissioner Olivia D. Farrow declared the alert after the National Weather Service forecast a potentially hazardous combination of high temperatures and humidity for the next two days.
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