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By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 13, 2014
Baltimore County Code Enforcement unveiled a new mobile system Thursday that will allow citizens to register and track neighborhood nuisance issues such as overgrown lawns, uncovered garbage and rats online. "This is a $1.13 million platform that automates code enforcement process, inspections and enforcement efforts," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz told a gathering of members of the press and community leaders at the Historic Courthouse in Towson Thursday. "You'll be able to electronically report and track code enforcement notices countywide.
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NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 13, 2014
Baltimore County Code Enforcement unveiled a new mobile system Thursday that will allow citizens to register and track neighborhood nuisance issues such as overgrown lawns, uncovered garbage and rats online. "This is a $1.13 million platform that automates code enforcement process, inspections and enforcement efforts," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz told a gathering of members of the press and community leaders at the Historic Courthouse in Towson Thursday. "You'll be able to electronically report and track code enforcement notices countywide.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2002
City officials will unveil a new program this month that will try to strengthen middle-class neighborhoods, Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano told a community meeting of Northeast Baltimore residents last night. Addressing a forum at Morgan State University's Schaefer Hall, Graziano said the Neighborhood Conservation Program will use such strategies as stricter code enforcement, low-interest rehabilitation loans and marketing for Baltimore's middle-class neighborhoods and their housing stock.
FEATURES
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Two years ago, the Sun's Arthur Hirsch profiled Baltimore County resident Mike Pierce and his obsessive drive to fight illegal signage . At the time, Pierce was responsible for a third of the county's complaints about nonpolitical signs. The Kingsville man is still on the case today. Pierce emailed me about today's article, “ Baltimore County cracks down on nuisance road signs .”  He said he was responsible for the complaints that led to fines against two of the businesses mentioned in the story - Cash for Cars and All-Star Automotive.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
A FAMILY LIVING through the cold and heat without electricity is headed for disaster. And it struck over the weekend, when three children and their grandmother died in a Baltimore fire that started from a candle. Could this have been prevented? Perhaps. But the harsh reality is that no amount of fire prevention activity -- and the city fire department's safety campaigns have been quite successful -- reaches all whose daily battle is about mere existence. Firmer housing code enforcement may be one way to prevent future tragedies.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
A skating rink in Woodlawn that police say consistently causes law enforcement problems has been granted a few more days to come up with a plan that might allow it to remain open for business. The reprieve came from a Baltimore County code enforcement officer, Meg Ferguson, who upheld a decision to revoke Skateworks' license but left the door open for discussions with the facility's owners about how to save the skating rink. The four owners now have until Wednesday to convince county officials of their commitment to avoid disruptions that police say have been caused by large crowds entering or leaving the facility at 1716 Whitehead Road.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Two East Baltimore pizzerias were closed last week by city health officials who found they repeatedly violated a ban on distributing fliers to residences and failed to pay their fines. The food permits of the two carryout restaurants, both named Nephew's Pizza, were suspended for five days, a period that ended Friday. "It's a good first start. It sends a message," said City Councilman Jim Kraft, who introduced the 2006 bill that banned distribution of commercial fliers to homes.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
One of Baltimore's highest ranking housing code inspectors owns at least six seriously deteriorated rowhouses on the city's east side -- contributing to the blight he is paid to control and leaving his tenants in often dangerous living conditions.His renters recite a litany of problems -- from rat infestation and a cracked sewer line to flooded basements and leaking roofs -- that has made their homes miserable places to live. At least two of his properties are boarded-up shells.The landlord is Henry John "Jack" Reed III, 55, a superintendent of inspections for the Department of Housing and Community Development who is directly responsible for enforcing the city housing code.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
They cropped up yesterday the minute Mark Gawel steered his county-owned Jeep Cherokee onto the Beltway exit leading to eastbound Liberty Road - so many signs in red and white and black and yellow, all illegally stuck in the grass or on telephone poles. Gawel and fellow Baltimore County code enforcement officer Ed Creed hopped out. They uprooted signs advertising stores, real estate deals and church functions, clipped others off electrical poles, dumped them all in the back of the Jeep, then drove a few yards down the street and started over.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
County officials have unveiled a proposed overhaul of Anne Arundel's 25-year-old subdivision ordinance, saying the changes would force developers to deal with crucial issues at the outset while offering more chances for public scrutiny of plans.It also would halve the time for a subdivision proposal to move through the bureaucracy.What is a two-step process for developers would become three steps, involving sketch plans, preliminary plans and final plans. Builders would be told at the start what issues they should resolve before returning with preliminary plans, said Joseph Elbrich, assistant planning and code enforcement director for development.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The signs shout advertisements from the sidewalks: $1 crabs, day care open until midnight, cherry wood furniture and fresh starts after bankruptcy. They cover telephone poles and sprout up in medians, sometimes getting swept away by wind. And they really get under some people's skin. "It irritates me to no end," said Ed Bard, president of the Rockdale Civic & Improvement Association, who called fighting illegal signs "one of my passions. " Baltimore County code enforcement officials say they are cracking down on the common nuisance.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Two East Baltimore pizzerias were closed last week by city health officials who found they repeatedly violated a ban on distributing fliers to residences and failed to pay their fines. The food permits of the two carryout restaurants, both named Nephew's Pizza, were suspended for five days, a period that ended Friday. "It's a good first start. It sends a message," said City Councilman Jim Kraft, who introduced the 2006 bill that banned distribution of commercial fliers to homes.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
The abandoned rowhouse next door to Wendy and Brian Malaney has been a nightmare of a neighbor. The rowhouse's roofing material blew off, and water seeped through the Malaneys' adjoining walls. Later the pipes burst in the neighboring property, flooding their basement. The air they and their two young daughters breathe is now heavy with the noxious stink of mold. Abandoned buildings are a perennial problem in Baltimore — a city where many residents share connecting walls. Nearly one-third of the city's 16,000 uninhabitable properties are near occupied homes, city officials say. And a key part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's new plan to attack vacancies is ratcheting up code enforcement on blocks where many residents still live, issuing fines more quickly.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Baltimore County voters will consider a referendum next week to require the county to change the way it determines salary increases and benefits for up to 3,000 employees, including emergency call dispatchers, health inspectors and code enforcement workers. The county firefighters and police are entitled to binding arbitration, a process that requires both the county and the union to abide by the decision of an independent third party on labor disputes. The ballot question would expand eligibility to "general" employees, a move that would make the county unusual among Maryland's jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Bryan P. Sears, Towson Times | May 24, 2010
Two Baltimore County residents say their rights to free speech have been violated because they were ordered to remove signs supporting Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s bid for governor. Their concerns have led county officials to suspend acting on anonymous complaints about improper campaign signs. In one case, Steve Kolbe, who lives on Dulaney Valley Road, had a 32-square-foot sign supporting Ehrlich, the former Republican governor seeking another term, in his yard until removing it to avoid a possible $200-per-day fine or 90 days in jail.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
A skating rink in Woodlawn that police say consistently causes law enforcement problems has been granted a few more days to come up with a plan that might allow it to remain open for business. The reprieve came from a Baltimore County code enforcement officer, Meg Ferguson, who upheld a decision to revoke Skateworks' license but left the door open for discussions with the facility's owners about how to save the skating rink. The four owners now have until Wednesday to convince county officials of their commitment to avoid disruptions that police say have been caused by large crowds entering or leaving the facility at 1716 Whitehead Road.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
Deputy fire chief to be acting chief for inspections, permits Anne Arundel County Deputy Fire Chief Robert Ray will serve as acting director of inspections and permits starting next month, a county spokesman announced. Ray has worked for the county fire department for 24 years. For 11 years, he has administered the department's fire investigation and code enforcement division. Ray, 46, completed a program for local government administrators at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government last summer.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2005
The Baltimore County Council approved legislation last night to expand a pilot program to inspect and license rental properties into five neighborhoods in Towson, Loch Raven and Perry Hall - and the council chairman said the members should consider taking the program countywide The measure adds Loch Raven Village, Rodgers Forge, Ridgeleigh, Towson Manor Village and a Perry Hall community near Seven Oaks Elementary School to five east-side communities included...
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | August 16, 2009
The problem:: A hole in an East Baltimore sidewalk remained unfilled for four months. The back story:: Harvey Levy owns the Sportsmart on Exeter Street, a family business for 30 years. He noticed a hole in the sidewalk in the 400 block of N. Gay St., near Orleans Street, in April and called 311 to report it. The opening, edged in metal, looked like any number of water meter vaults found elsewhere in the city - except the cover was missing. When Levy saw that prompt action had not been taken, he called back.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
THE PROBLEM: : Overgrown bushes and weeds block pedestrians' path on a sidewalk in Northeast Baltimore. THE BACK STORY: : The grass is green and lush on Sinclair Lane. Unfortunately, so are the weeds and shrubs. Lottie Sweat walks north on Sinclair Lane, in neighborhood of Frankford, to get to the post office at least once a week. But for months, weeds and other greenery growing taller and wider have encroached on the sidewalk along a short stretch between Parkside Drive and Bowleys Lane, requiring pedestrians to detour into the roadway.
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