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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1994
For fans of movie-theater popcorn -- "the Godzilla of snack foods," according to a report released earlier this week -- there may be a kernel of hope. At least in Baltimore.Here, theater-goers have a good chance of sitting down with a tub of corn popped in vegetable oil, which in health terms, is better for you than that popped with the saturated-fat coconut oil cited in a study released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.The watchdog group reports that a 16-cup serving of unbuttered, coconut-oil-popped corn has 901 calories and 43 grams of cholesterol.
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HEALTH
By Sierra George, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post from Sierra George, dietetic intern, is printed here. Despite its name, the coconut is a fruit from the coconut palm. Tropical cultures have been using this delicious fruit for everything from food to body lotion and even currency. Until recently, Americans have seen coconut mostly as the dried, shredded ingredient of cookies, candies and cakes. Now, as more products derived from the coconut hit grocery store shelves, we are given the delicious opportunity to get creative with the coconut.
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HEALTH
By Sierra George, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post from Sierra George, dietetic intern, is printed here. Despite its name, the coconut is a fruit from the coconut palm. Tropical cultures have been using this delicious fruit for everything from food to body lotion and even currency. Until recently, Americans have seen coconut mostly as the dried, shredded ingredient of cookies, candies and cakes. Now, as more products derived from the coconut hit grocery store shelves, we are given the delicious opportunity to get creative with the coconut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Slugger Luke Scott went deep into his culinary repertoire Wednesday and won the second annual Orioles Cook-Off at the ESPN Zone in downtown Baltimore. Scott's surf and turf dish, a mixture of grilled steak and sautéed salmon topped with scallops, edged out Kevin Millwood's chicken enchiladas and Brad Bergesen's grilled salmon in a good-natured cooking competition benefitting the Maryland Food Bank. Scott, the Orioles slugger, smiled and raised his arms to form a "V" when Jim Hunter, Oriole broadcaster and master of ceremonies for the event, announced that a panel of judges had picked Scott's dish as the best.
FEATURES
By Michael McGehee and Michael McGehee,Chicago Tribune | April 16, 1998
Leapin' lizard saves the dayGEX, the karate-kicking, wall-climbing, wise-cracking lizard returns to save television in "GEX: Enter the Gecko" from Sony PlayStation ($50).This ultra-hip secret agent was recruited by government special forces to outwit Rez, who has taken control of television.GEX enters different worlds by jumping through a TV screen. In each world, GEX takes on a new disguise, from Indiana Jones to Bugs Bunny.If you're in search of a game with lots of attitude, GEX is an excellent choice.
NEWS
By Ellen Kanner and Ellen Kanner,McClatchy Tribune | June 3, 2009
What's to love about coconut? It's rich and creamy, an addictive staple in Thai, Indian and Caribbean cuisine. Coconut is high in immunity-boosting lauric acid, which is touted (though not proven) to lower cholesterol and rev metabolism. What's not to love? Coconut is high in saturated fat. However, your body digests it more readily than animal fats, so don't shun the coconut. Add lushness to vegetables and whole grains with canned coconut milk. This is no sugary pina colada mix, but a solution of grated, squeezed coconut meat and water.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Slugger Luke Scott went deep into his culinary repertoire Wednesday and won the second annual Orioles Cook-Off at the ESPN Zone in downtown Baltimore. Scott's surf and turf dish, a mixture of grilled steak and sautéed salmon topped with scallops, edged out Kevin Millwood's chicken enchiladas and Brad Bergesen's grilled salmon in a good-natured cooking competition benefitting the Maryland Food Bank. Scott, the Orioles slugger, smiled and raised his arms to form a "V" when Jim Hunter, Oriole broadcaster and master of ceremonies for the event, announced that a panel of judges had picked Scott's dish as the best.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2004
SAN DIEGO - As if eating badly and being overweight weren't already harmful enough, research announced yesterday suggests that consuming too much of several kinds of fat can damage memory and intellect. With about a third of the U.S. population either overweight or obese, the results could have broad significance for the national IQ. "We are in the midst of an obesity epidemic in the United States," said Dr. Barry Levin, of the VA Medical Center in East Orange, N.J. "These studies show that diets high in fat are a risk factor for not only heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes, but for cognitive decline as well."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 28, 2000
Q. Thank you for suggesting almond oil for fingernails. This remedy is fantastic. In just a month, my nails have improved 100 percent. They are stronger, longer and don't split in layers like they did in the past. I don't know if it is the oil or the massage of the cuticle as I rub the oil in. Also, I wonder if any oil, not just almond oil, would work, but I'm not about to experiment. A. We are pleased that almond oil helped your nails. Other readers have reported benefit from Hoofmaker and Elon Nail Conditioner, so we suspect that any good moisturizer can be beneficial.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | September 6, 1992
Coconut flavors so many of our favorite desserts -- cookies, candies, pies, cakes, puddings. It is also a major ingredient in the dishes of many cuisines halfway around the world. Coconut many garnish an Indian curry, flavor a Polynesian seafood dish or form the basis of a spicy Thai soup.Peak season for fresh, whole coconut runs from September through March, so if you love fresh coconut, now's the time to shop.Look for coconuts that feel heavy for their size and listen for the slosh of liquid inside -- the more liquid, the better.
NEWS
By Ellen Kanner and Ellen Kanner,McClatchy Tribune | June 3, 2009
What's to love about coconut? It's rich and creamy, an addictive staple in Thai, Indian and Caribbean cuisine. Coconut is high in immunity-boosting lauric acid, which is touted (though not proven) to lower cholesterol and rev metabolism. What's not to love? Coconut is high in saturated fat. However, your body digests it more readily than animal fats, so don't shun the coconut. Add lushness to vegetables and whole grains with canned coconut milk. This is no sugary pina colada mix, but a solution of grated, squeezed coconut meat and water.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2004
SAN DIEGO - As if eating badly and being overweight weren't already harmful enough, research announced yesterday suggests that consuming too much of several kinds of fat can damage memory and intellect. With about a third of the U.S. population either overweight or obese, the results could have broad significance for the national IQ. "We are in the midst of an obesity epidemic in the United States," said Dr. Barry Levin, of the VA Medical Center in East Orange, N.J. "These studies show that diets high in fat are a risk factor for not only heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes, but for cognitive decline as well."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 28, 2000
Q. Thank you for suggesting almond oil for fingernails. This remedy is fantastic. In just a month, my nails have improved 100 percent. They are stronger, longer and don't split in layers like they did in the past. I don't know if it is the oil or the massage of the cuticle as I rub the oil in. Also, I wonder if any oil, not just almond oil, would work, but I'm not about to experiment. A. We are pleased that almond oil helped your nails. Other readers have reported benefit from Hoofmaker and Elon Nail Conditioner, so we suspect that any good moisturizer can be beneficial.
FEATURES
By Michael McGehee and Michael McGehee,Chicago Tribune | April 16, 1998
Leapin' lizard saves the dayGEX, the karate-kicking, wall-climbing, wise-cracking lizard returns to save television in "GEX: Enter the Gecko" from Sony PlayStation ($50).This ultra-hip secret agent was recruited by government special forces to outwit Rez, who has taken control of television.GEX enters different worlds by jumping through a TV screen. In each world, GEX takes on a new disguise, from Indiana Jones to Bugs Bunny.If you're in search of a game with lots of attitude, GEX is an excellent choice.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1994
For fans of movie-theater popcorn -- "the Godzilla of snack foods," according to a report released earlier this week -- there may be a kernel of hope. At least in Baltimore.Here, theater-goers have a good chance of sitting down with a tub of corn popped in vegetable oil, which in health terms, is better for you than that popped with the saturated-fat coconut oil cited in a study released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.The watchdog group reports that a 16-cup serving of unbuttered, coconut-oil-popped corn has 901 calories and 43 grams of cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | September 6, 1992
Coconut flavors so many of our favorite desserts -- cookies, candies, pies, cakes, puddings. It is also a major ingredient in the dishes of many cuisines halfway around the world. Coconut many garnish an Indian curry, flavor a Polynesian seafood dish or form the basis of a spicy Thai soup.Peak season for fresh, whole coconut runs from September through March, so if you love fresh coconut, now's the time to shop.Look for coconuts that feel heavy for their size and listen for the slosh of liquid inside -- the more liquid, the better.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | June 19, 2014
When friends ask Jakki Wienecke to suggest a body lotion to relieve dry skin, the owner of Divine Creations Aromatherapy tells them to raid their kitchen pantry instead of going to the drugstore. Peel the rind of a lemon and soak the pieces in olive oil and slather it on your body, says Wienecke, the former owner of Body Logic Wellness Spa in Bel Air. The lemon contains antioxidants while the olive oil boosts your immune system, says the Bel Air resident. “All lotions begin with oil and they add water to it,” Wienecke says.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
MAYBE THERE'S something to the whole notion of comfort food - you know, snacks that quell the restless mind. And just maybe that has to do with certain ingredients in these foods making you, er, dumber. Think about that, if you can, the next time you lay into a scrumptious slab of coffee cake or wolf down an irresistible mound of french fries - foods often steeped in certain fats. As reported by The Sun's David Kohn, a new study has found that rats fed a diet of 10 percent coconut oil, a trans fat, showed impaired memory and learning in a series of mazes - compared with rats fed soybean oil, which is not a trans fat. Other tests on mice fed both saturated and trans fats yielded roughly similar results.
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