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By Jacques Kelly | January 17, 2004
MY BROTHER Eddie and I were discussing my sister Mimi's coming birthday. We were chatting about the merits of coconut cake, her first choice for that day's celebration, maybe preceded by sour beef and dumplings. Strict rules governed the coconut we experienced. My grandmother Lily Rose, who made everything from her own dresses to the household soap she used on anything dirty, liked to buy a strictly whole coconut, covered in a hairy brown scalp. (Her second choice would have been grated from the Belair or Lexington markets.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After three years mixing, bottling and boxing natural personal care products to be sold in local shops at their home in Annapolis, Robert and Zoe Benzinger are poised for bigger things. For the first time their company, eco-armour, will be among the exhibitors starting Wednesday at Natural Products Expo East 2014 in Baltimore, billed as the largest trade show on the East Coast devoted to goods made from ingredients found in nature treated with relatively little processing. The industry says sales of natural food for people and pets, diet supplements, and cosmetics and grooming products are growing about 8 percent a year.
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FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 27, 2001
Item: Haagen-Dazs Gelato What you get: One pint (4 servings) Cost: About $3.50 Nutritional content: Coconut -- 240 calories, 8 grams fat, 4.5 grams saturated fat, 75 milligrams sodium; Chocolate -- 240 calories, 8 grams fat, 4.5 grams saturated fat, 70 milligrams sodium Preparation time: Open and serve Review: If you come to my house in the summer, please don't expect me to make dessert. Even with air conditioning, I'm not facing a 350-degree oven just to bake you a cake. Fortunately, I have a few cool treats to fall back on, like this luscious gelato from Haagen-Dazs.
HEALTH
By Sierra George, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post from Sierra George, dietetic intern, is printed here. Despite its name, the coconut is a fruit from the coconut palm. Tropical cultures have been using this delicious fruit for everything from food to body lotion and even currency. Until recently, Americans have seen coconut mostly as the dried, shredded ingredient of cookies, candies and cakes. Now, as more products derived from the coconut hit grocery store shelves, we are given the delicious opportunity to get creative with the coconut.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: DESICCATED A recipe may call for the use of desiccated coconut, that is, dehydrated, dried coconut. The word (pronounced DES-uh-kate-ed) comes into English from the Latin verb desiccare , "to dry up. " If you desiccate something, you remove the moisture from it. If you use a chemical agent to dry something up, the agent is a desiccant . As is so often the case, the literal sense of the word has taken on a figurative meaning.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | June 27, 1993
How many of us have gotten to meet real folks when we travel to other other countries for short vacations? I know I haven't, and it's been a big disappointment to me.I recently found out, though, that in Jamaica you can "Meet the People." The Jamaica Tourist Board has a program of that name designed to introduce visitors to that Caribbean island to the folks who live there.Almost as exciting as meeting a few of the people of Jamaica on my recent trip, was meeting the food of Jamaica.Rose and Cecil Morrison of Montego Bay, a retired couple who were instrumental in starting the program way back in 1964 and who have entertained more than 350 guests in their home, invited me for a sumptuous lunch showcasing Jamaica's specialties.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
In the city, Thai curried chicken comes in red, yellow or green. An order usually constitutes an impossibly small box of clumpy white rice and a container of meat and vegetables in a coconut-flavored broth. Here's a sampling of the dish from four local Thai restaurants. Ban Thai 340 N. Charles St. -- 410-727-0125 Hours --11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Saturday While the yellow curried chicken, $14.65, was the most expensive of the four we sampled, the plastic carton of chicken strips, potato wedges, onion slices and sauce was twice the size.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
On the Hill 1431 John St.; 410-225-9667 Open 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m-8 p.m. Saturday Now that school has started, the pace has quickened at On The Hill, a stylish cafe at John and Mosher streets. Customers from the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art, Mount Royal Elementary-Middle and Midtown Academy stream into the Bolton Hill restaurant for coffee, chai and artfully made fare. Inside, it is small, noisy and friendly. Most patrons grab their food and go. Some linger at the six small tables that line the perimeter.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Jennifer Trainer Thompson first encountered the charms of Caribbean cocktails several years ago when a boat she was helping deliver broke a mast and marooned the crew on a tiny Bahamian island. The place had little to recommend it except a beach and a thatched-roof, dirt-floor bar that served "glorious rum punches." After a few days, repairs were completed and the crew pressed on. But Thompson never lost her fascination with "boat drinks," as Jimmy Buffett calls them - or, in Thompson's words, "frothy, pastel-colored cocktails with big flavor and often big alcohol."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 18, 1993
The unpretentious Northeast Market has yet to be sullied by any stain of trendiness.It's a city market that isn't trying to be a sushi bar or fast-food grease pit. It's still a place to buy turnips, fresh chicken wings, turkey necks, souse and unbagged Utz potato chips.Comestibles do not have the aisles entirely to themselves. Some merchants sell frizzy wigs, fuchsia hats, brassy earrings and bronze-framed religious picture.Located at Monument, Chester and McElderry streets, the municipally owned market is essentially an expansive shed protected by a heavily trussed roof.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Fran Merkley from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making coconut macaroons that she thought may have been published in this column around 15 years ago. The cookies were made with flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk, and could be made in chocolate or vanilla flavors. What stuck with her about the recipe, aside from how delicious the cookies were, was that the woman who sent it in said it was the job of her younger sibling to put the cherry on each cookie. We searched The Baltimore Sun's archives and located a recipe for chocolate cherry macaroons that appeared in paper in December 1992 in a column called Kids in the Kitchen written by Beth Hillson.
HEALTH
By Amy Reed, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Amy Reed weighs in on coconut drinks. Coconut products, such as coconut water and coconut cream, are among the hot new items hitting grocery store shelves. Are these drinks beneficial for your health? Coconut water is the liquid inside a young coconut. One cup of coconut water contains about 50 calories and no protein or fat. Coconut water is low in calories, although the amount varies depending on added ingredients such as sugar or juice.
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
After a long day basking in the sun, you might be thinking it's time to cruise to a happy hour to grab a little grub and a tasty beverage. If your newly bronzed skin and sandy hair have you feeling ready for a night out, we have the spot for you. Coconuts Beach Bar and Grill, located outside of the Castle in the Sand Hotel on 37th Street ocean-side, provides beachgoers with the perfect start to an evening's festivities. Coconuts is truly on point with its happy hour. It starts at 5 p.m. on-the-dot and ends at 6 p.m., and offers a two-for-one drink special.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: DESICCATED A recipe may call for the use of desiccated coconut, that is, dehydrated, dried coconut. The word (pronounced DES-uh-kate-ed) comes into English from the Latin verb desiccare , "to dry up. " If you desiccate something, you remove the moisture from it. If you use a chemical agent to dry something up, the agent is a desiccant . As is so often the case, the literal sense of the word has taken on a figurative meaning.
NEWS
By Ellen Kanner and Ellen Kanner,McClatchy Tribune | June 3, 2009
What's to love about coconut? It's rich and creamy, an addictive staple in Thai, Indian and Caribbean cuisine. Coconut is high in immunity-boosting lauric acid, which is touted (though not proven) to lower cholesterol and rev metabolism. What's not to love? Coconut is high in saturated fat. However, your body digests it more readily than animal fats, so don't shun the coconut. Add lushness to vegetables and whole grains with canned coconut milk. This is no sugary pina colada mix, but a solution of grated, squeezed coconut meat and water.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
On the Hill 1431 John St.; 410-225-9667 Open 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m-8 p.m. Saturday Now that school has started, the pace has quickened at On The Hill, a stylish cafe at John and Mosher streets. Customers from the nearby Maryland Institute College of Art, Mount Royal Elementary-Middle and Midtown Academy stream into the Bolton Hill restaurant for coffee, chai and artfully made fare. Inside, it is small, noisy and friendly. Most patrons grab their food and go. Some linger at the six small tables that line the perimeter.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 24, 1990
There was no sweeter secret than elaborate Christmas mornings staged by my family.As a child, I never laid eyes on a tree, present, decoration or Christmas garden before 6:45 a.m. Dec. 25. To this day, I marvel at the golden transformations my parents and grandparents achieved to delight the six then -little Kellys that day.The weeks before Christmas were a time of much speculation about the anticipated event. My sister Nannie recalls the year my brother Eddie tricked Josie, the youngest of the Kellys, into believing she was getting a bicycle for Christmas.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After three years mixing, bottling and boxing natural personal care products to be sold in local shops at their home in Annapolis, Robert and Zoe Benzinger are poised for bigger things. For the first time their company, eco-armour, will be among the exhibitors starting Wednesday at Natural Products Expo East 2014 in Baltimore, billed as the largest trade show on the East Coast devoted to goods made from ingredients found in nature treated with relatively little processing. The industry says sales of natural food for people and pets, diet supplements, and cosmetics and grooming products are growing about 8 percent a year.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 10, 2008
Afew months ago, while my husband and I were in Paris working for several weeks, I noticed an unusual soup listed on the chalkboard outside a cafe in our neighborhood. I wasn't planning to eat lunch there but was so intrigued by the sound of a carrot-and-coconut soup that I stopped in. The waitress asked if I wanted the potage cold or warm, and I opted for the latter. Several minutes later, she returned with a bowl of piping-hot soup that was thick, creamy and a lovely orange hue. One sip and I knew I wanted the recipe.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
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