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NEWS
December 1, 2003
IVORY COAST'S name is a misnomer. Although its state emblem depicts an elephant's head, hardly any of those majestic tusked animals are left there. Instead, cocoa is the West African country's claim to fame. It's the world's leading grower of beans that give chocolate its delicious flavor. That distinction, too, is in danger of disappearing. A rekindled rebellion has disrupted this year's harvesting, curtailing output and sending world cocoa prices to new highs. Ivory Coast used to be West Africa's wealthiest and most stable country.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 3, 2008
December is the month when many of us make and share food with others. Home bakers turn out all manner of sweet treats. Others serve warm mulled cider or wine at caroling parties and trim-the-tree gatherings. Everywhere there is a sense of celebration through food. I join right in, picking up on this holiday spirit. Recently, I came up with an idea for holiday spiced hot chocolate, which I expect to use often during the next few weeks. This special cocoa mix could easily be packaged as a gift.
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NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | March 7, 2007
I've been searching for Dutch-process cocoa. In the supermarkets, I just see Nestle and Hershey's cocoa, neither of which says "Dutch" or "processed with alkali." Chocolate liquor has two principal components - cocoa solids and cocoa butter - and in 1828, a Dutchman named Coenraad Van Houten invented a method for separating the two. The newly independent cocoa solids also could be pulverized to make a fine powder with lots of chocolate flavor but little fat: cocoa powder. Van Houten also invented a process by which cocoa powder, which is naturally quite acidic, was treated with an alkaline to neutralize the flavor and deepen the color.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | September 12, 2007
Joy Johnson of Hamilton, N.J., was looking for a recipe for a chocolate-pistachio cake that she thought was originally published in McCall's magazine in the 1980s. Several readers had the original recipe from the January 1984 issue and from the McCall's cooking school series of the same time. Betty Blecki of Timonium kindly sent in a color photo copy of the cake recipe complete with step-by-step picture directions. Once you make this cake, it's easy to understand why so many readers held onto the recipe.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2006
Bettye Steinberg of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Chocolate Snowballs that she had for more than 50 years and misplaced. This old-fashioned favorite was made using Hershey's cocoa, sugar, water and canned milk that were cooked together and then frozen in ice-cube trays. Marjorie Felt of Baltimore sent in her recipe for the frozen treat, which she says was her mother's specialty. Felt says this recipe "brings back memories of our old neighborhood and is still enjoyed today by new generations."
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | December 28, 2005
Billions of candy bars stocked on American store shelves could get their start on the docks of Baltimore in the new year. In May, the port, which has made a business of handling the rolled, the bagged and the bulky, will become an official cocoa port for the New York Board of Trade. That means thousands of tons of cocoa beans, a key ingredient in chocolate bars, hot chocolate and other sweets, will be stored in warehouses in Baltimore while they await a candy maker or other buyer. The board is a futures market where investors buy and sell commodities, sometimes many times, and big consumers seek to hedge or lock in prices and to ensure steady product and prices.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 18, 1995
Cocoa powder carries all the flavor of rich chocolate but with much less cocoa butter.Cocoa and chocolate come from the same fruit of a tropical evergreen tree. Cocoa is made from milling roasted cocoa beans, called nibs. Milling crushes the beans into a chocolate paste. This paste, commonly called chocolate liquor, is either pressed to remove cocoa butter to form cocoa powder or has cocoa butter added to enrich it to form chocolate. The resulting cocoa powder has between 10 percent to 24 percent fat compared to 30 percent to 80 percent for typical chocolate.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1998
An unusual alliance of manufacturers and environmental groups has formed to try to prevent what for many people around the world would be a disaster of gigantic proportions: a shortage of chocolate.For while the world's appetite for chocolate grows more voracious each year, cocoa farms around the globe are failing, under siege from fungal and viral diseases and insects.For decades, cocoa farming has escaped such problems by moving to new areas in the tropics, even new countries or continents, where growers find more rain forest to establish cocoa farms.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,COWLES SYNDICATE | April 28, 1996
My friend gave me her mother's hand-painted cocoa set. Some of the pieces are marked with a shield with the word "Thomas" in the center and "Bavaria" below. Some are marked with "B & Co. France."Why would there be two different names?The first mark was used around 1908 by the porcelain factory of F. Thomas. It was in Marktredwitz, Bavaria, Germany.The company was sold and is now a subsidiary of Rosenthal Glass & Porcelain.The other mark was used after 1925 by L. Bernardaud & Co. in Limoges and Paris, France.
NEWS
September 3, 2000
Mexican sweet chocolate is a blend of ground cocoa nibs (the seeds of cocoa pods), raw (unrefined) sugar, and cinnamon. It should not be confused with "instant" drink mixes, cocoa powder or milk chocolate. Molded into small cakes, it is available at many supermarkets specializing in Mexican foods. Store dried polenta in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. Use within 6 months of purchase. Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
June 28, 2007
An estimated 5,000 lynchings took place during the Jim Crow and Civil Rights eras. Most went unsolved, but some of the people responsible for those and other horrific race murders are still alive. There is still time to hold them accountable. That's the idea behind the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act, which recently passed the U.S. House of Representatives on a 422 to 2 vote but has since stalled in the Senate. The bill would create a "cold case" squad in the Justice Department to pursue unsolved civil rights murders.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman | May 2, 2007
Martha Daniels of Wake Forest, N.C., was looking for a cupcake recipe called Cocoa-Pink Cuplets. She thought that the recipe might have appeared in a Pillsbury Bake-Off cookbook many years ago. She said these unfrosted cupcakes were simple but delicious. Beryl Benda of Baltimore sent in a recipe she had in her collection for Cocoa-Pink Cuplets taken from a Pillsbury Bake-Off cookbook. It says that the recipe, by Mrs. Robert Hoefer of Brookfield, Wis., for Cocoa-Pink Cuplets was the senior winner in the Pillsbury's 10th Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 23, 2007
Is this a great country, or what? Imagine Cocoa Puffs sharing the same breakfast buffet with grilled salmon. Cinnamon buns and steamed broccoli. Sausage links and bacon glistening with fat and smoked trout. Why, in less than a half-hour of cruising the Hotel JALCity lineup, it's easy to be both slothful and virtuous while trying American and Japanese cuisine. One can only imagine what the chef looks like. I imagine a daffy cross-breeding of John Belushi's irresponsible Bluto Blutarsky and the no-nonsense woman from my junior high school cooking class.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | March 7, 2007
I've been searching for Dutch-process cocoa. In the supermarkets, I just see Nestle and Hershey's cocoa, neither of which says "Dutch" or "processed with alkali." Chocolate liquor has two principal components - cocoa solids and cocoa butter - and in 1828, a Dutchman named Coenraad Van Houten invented a method for separating the two. The newly independent cocoa solids also could be pulverized to make a fine powder with lots of chocolate flavor but little fat: cocoa powder. Van Houten also invented a process by which cocoa powder, which is naturally quite acidic, was treated with an alkaline to neutralize the flavor and deepen the color.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2006
Bettye Steinberg of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Chocolate Snowballs that she had for more than 50 years and misplaced. This old-fashioned favorite was made using Hershey's cocoa, sugar, water and canned milk that were cooked together and then frozen in ice-cube trays. Marjorie Felt of Baltimore sent in her recipe for the frozen treat, which she says was her mother's specialty. Felt says this recipe "brings back memories of our old neighborhood and is still enjoyed today by new generations."
NEWS
By CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND and CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2006
You know your wine comes from Bordeaux, your goat cheese from a farm in California and your coffee from a free-trade plantation in Costa Rica. Now you can trace the origin of your chocolate beans. The trend in chocolate is toward higher cocoa percentages in single-origin varieties that feature the unique taste, smell and texture of an area, be it Java, Tanzania or Santo Domingo. So for your sophisticated sweetheart this Valentine's Day, you might want to dust off your atlas. "There's something ultra-luxurious about a straightforward, delicious chocolate that is created in a small production, hands-on environment," says Edye Sanford, 40, a Baltimore clothing designer and seamstress who enjoys single-origin chocolates at her monthly mothers' group meeting.
NEWS
February 28, 2003
On Saturday, February 22, 2003, HAZEL MAXINE MASON, age 67, died at home in Cocoa, FL. Born in Highpoint, NC, she came to Florida in 1984 from Michigan City, Indiana. She was preceded in death by her husband Alexander Mason Sr. She is survived by her children: Phillip J. Mason, of Cocoa, FL, Charles E. Phillips of Biglerville, PA, Arlene Lee Phillips of Cocoa, FL, Margaret A. Handtke of Cocoa, FL, Donna Powell of Ellicott City, MD, Alexander F. Mason Jr. of Cocoa, FL; stepchildren: David Mason and Sheila Bazemore, of Baltimore, MD; two brothers: Arthur Stratton of Chase, MD, Frank STratton of Gettysburg, PA; a sister: Fran Marcellino of Westminster, MD; 17 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman | May 2, 2007
Martha Daniels of Wake Forest, N.C., was looking for a cupcake recipe called Cocoa-Pink Cuplets. She thought that the recipe might have appeared in a Pillsbury Bake-Off cookbook many years ago. She said these unfrosted cupcakes were simple but delicious. Beryl Benda of Baltimore sent in a recipe she had in her collection for Cocoa-Pink Cuplets taken from a Pillsbury Bake-Off cookbook. It says that the recipe, by Mrs. Robert Hoefer of Brookfield, Wis., for Cocoa-Pink Cuplets was the senior winner in the Pillsbury's 10th Grand National Recipe and Baking Contest.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 11, 2006
Last year Starbucks, sensing a trend, introduced hot chocolate into its lineup. If you're thinking the company has always sold hot chocolate, think again. Connoisseurs make a distinction between hot chocolate, essentially a liquid chocolate bar, and cocoa, that favorite childhood drink made with cocoa powder, sugar and milk or water. Stone Mill Bakery Green Spring Station, Brooklandville Price --$3.25 Ingredients --Shaved Valrhona chocolate and half-and-half Comments --If you can get the bakery to make this slowly so no skin forms, this could be the best of the best.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | December 28, 2005
Billions of candy bars stocked on American store shelves could get their start on the docks of Baltimore in the new year. In May, the port, which has made a business of handling the rolled, the bagged and the bulky, will become an official cocoa port for the New York Board of Trade. That means thousands of tons of cocoa beans, a key ingredient in chocolate bars, hot chocolate and other sweets, will be stored in warehouses in Baltimore while they await a candy maker or other buyer. The board is a futures market where investors buy and sell commodities, sometimes many times, and big consumers seek to hedge or lock in prices and to ensure steady product and prices.
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