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By Lita Solis-Cohen | September 1, 1991
While the rest of the art and antiques market is on the rocks, vintage cocktail shakers are making a comeback. They are appearing at antiques shows and shops, and some art deco designs by Russel Wright and Norman Bel Geddes can be seen in museum cases.Fifty years ago no one spoke of stirring a martini so as not to bruise the gin. Gin and vermouth were shaken vigorously over ice, then strained into a cocktail glass and sipped by the likes of Noel Coward, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, William Powell and Myrna Loy."
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By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
In his 1935 essay "How to Drink Like a Gentleman," writer H.L. Mencken, Sage of Baltimore, compared drinking to sex: We could all use a few tips on how to do it correctly. Clearly, he had a lot of pent-up wisdom to impart, post-Prohibition era. Mencken spent much of that time lambasting the temperance movement in the pages of The Evening Sun, blaming teetotalers for ruining the perfect conviviality of a good drink. He once said a cocktail is "the greatest of all contributions of the American way of life [and]
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By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Where exactly is the "south side" of the classic Southside cocktail? Bartenders themselves have troubling pinning down its origins. According to beverage lore, the drink could be named after the South Side of Chicago or the Southside Sportsmen's Club on Long Island, N.Y. - no one seems to be sure. Speculation only increases with its ingredients, since it can be made to order with vodka, gin or rum. But Ted Bauer, owner of the Valley Inn in Brooklandville, just north of the Beltway, confidently noted that Baltimore was an early adopter of the recipe, a summer favorite on the country club circuit.
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By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Where exactly is the "south side" of the classic Southside cocktail? Bartenders themselves have troubling pinning down its origins. According to beverage lore, the drink could be named after the South Side of Chicago or the Southside Sportsmen's Club on Long Island, N.Y. - no one seems to be sure. Speculation only increases with its ingredients, since it can be made to order with vodka, gin or rum. But Ted Bauer, owner of the Valley Inn in Brooklandville, just north of the Beltway, confidently noted that Baltimore was an early adopter of the recipe, a summer favorite on the country club circuit.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Jennifer Trainer Thompson first encountered the charms of Caribbean cocktails several years ago when a boat she was helping deliver broke a mast and marooned the crew on a tiny Bahamian island. The place had little to recommend it except a beach and a thatched-roof, dirt-floor bar that served "glorious rum punches." After a few days, repairs were completed and the crew pressed on. But Thompson never lost her fascination with "boat drinks," as Jimmy Buffett calls them - or, in Thompson's words, "frothy, pastel-colored cocktails with big flavor and often big alcohol."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | January 22, 2013
Hairdresser on Fire. You see that on Fleet Street Kitchen's craft cocktail menu and you're immediately intrigued. That's not a question. So you continue on to the ingredients. Mezcal? Smoky and potent. Check. Campari? Classic bitters - this is going to be strong. You're in. Sherry … sherry? Wait, what? Apologies in advance to chefs and old ladies, but sherry, to me, is a cooking ingredient at best … or maybe something my grandma would take a nip of on special occasions. Why would I drink that?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
  “Grammarnoir 5: The Shame of the Prose” is a four-part serial, running on Mondays from February 11 until the thrilling conclusion on March 4, National Grammar Day.  Grammarnoir is a work of fiction.  Any resemblance of characters to any persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Part 1: See a Fellow About a Scam Part 2: The Capo   Part 3: Cocktails with Colleen Colleen Newvine was the Stylebook 's hotsy-totsy enforcer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
In his 1935 essay "How to Drink Like a Gentleman," writer H.L. Mencken, Sage of Baltimore, compared drinking to sex: We could all use a few tips on how to do it correctly. Clearly, he had a lot of pent-up wisdom to impart, post-Prohibition era. Mencken spent much of that time lambasting the temperance movement in the pages of The Evening Sun, blaming teetotalers for ruining the perfect conviviality of a good drink. He once said a cocktail is "the greatest of all contributions of the American way of life [and]
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1991
Happy New Year. The year is 1939, by Michael Smith's count.Mr. Smith has just finished decorating a new apartment in a 1938 building in Manhattan's Chelsea section.The RCA television in his living room was one of the first in the United States, in 1939. (It works.) The matches in the ashtray in his bedroom say "The Stork Club." (They light.) His parakeet, Jazz, lives in a streamlined cage. (It tweets, or maybe it scats.)This one-bedroom apartment reflects how a middle-class American might have lived in the '30s, if he had perfect taste and suffered neither scratches in the chrome, rips in the upholstery nor cracks in the glassware.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram | August 1, 2001
Spicing up the summer Most Americans think of nutmeg as a holiday spice. But in Grenada, which produces a third of the world's supply, nutmeg is used year-round. Use it to spice up your summer with Nutmeg Rum Punch. For one serving, combine 1 ounce each of lime, orange and pineapple juices with 1 ounce of grenadine, 2 ounces of light rum and 3 or 4 ice cubes in a cocktail shaker. Shake vigorously and strain into a small glass. Sprinkle with grated nutmeg. Enhanced by ham Summertime's abundance of fruit offers an ideal opportunity to enjoy Prosciutto di Parma - a delicacy that qualifies as both an authentic Italian antipasto and a fast food.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
  “Grammarnoir 5: The Shame of the Prose” is a four-part serial, running on Mondays from February 11 until the thrilling conclusion on March 4, National Grammar Day.  Grammarnoir is a work of fiction.  Any resemblance of characters to any persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Part 1: See a Fellow About a Scam Part 2: The Capo   Part 3: Cocktails with Colleen Colleen Newvine was the Stylebook 's hotsy-totsy enforcer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | January 22, 2013
Hairdresser on Fire. You see that on Fleet Street Kitchen's craft cocktail menu and you're immediately intrigued. That's not a question. So you continue on to the ingredients. Mezcal? Smoky and potent. Check. Campari? Classic bitters - this is going to be strong. You're in. Sherry … sherry? Wait, what? Apologies in advance to chefs and old ladies, but sherry, to me, is a cooking ingredient at best … or maybe something my grandma would take a nip of on special occasions. Why would I drink that?
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Jennifer Trainer Thompson first encountered the charms of Caribbean cocktails several years ago when a boat she was helping deliver broke a mast and marooned the crew on a tiny Bahamian island. The place had little to recommend it except a beach and a thatched-roof, dirt-floor bar that served "glorious rum punches." After a few days, repairs were completed and the crew pressed on. But Thompson never lost her fascination with "boat drinks," as Jimmy Buffett calls them - or, in Thompson's words, "frothy, pastel-colored cocktails with big flavor and often big alcohol."
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | September 1, 1991
While the rest of the art and antiques market is on the rocks, vintage cocktail shakers are making a comeback. They are appearing at antiques shows and shops, and some art deco designs by Russel Wright and Norman Bel Geddes can be seen in museum cases.Fifty years ago no one spoke of stirring a martini so as not to bruise the gin. Gin and vermouth were shaken vigorously over ice, then strained into a cocktail glass and sipped by the likes of Noel Coward, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, William Powell and Myrna Loy."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1991
Happy New Year. The year is 1939, by Michael Smith's count.Mr. Smith has just finished decorating a new apartment in a 1938 building in Manhattan's Chelsea section.The RCA television in his living room was one of the first in the United States, in 1939. (It works.) The matches in the ashtray in his bedroom say "The Stork Club." (They light.) His parakeet, Jazz, lives in a streamlined cage. (It tweets, or maybe it scats.)This one-bedroom apartment reflects how a middle-class American might have lived in the '30s, if he had perfect taste and suffered neither scratches in the chrome, rips in the upholstery nor cracks in the glassware.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2002
Rum may not be as popular these days as in the 18th century, when consumption in the American Colonies was said to average about four gallons per person each year. But this storied brew of sugar cane and water is pleasing an increasing number of palates these days. The Beverage Journal reports that rum was the fastest-growing segment of the spirits category last year, selling some 50,000 gallons more than it had five years before. Some of this popularity is fueled by flavored rums, including products featuring vanilla, coconut, banana, pineapple and other flavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and By Meekah Hopkins | March 11, 2014
The Cucumberous at Dooby's in Mount Vernon hits two March birds with one stone. It's a festive concoction of green - perfectly suited for St. Patrick's month here in the city. But more importantly, it's a light, herbaceous cocktail to usher in sweet, oh-so-desperately needed springtime. As the name implies, the drink centers around cucumbers - and flavors that pair well with the vegetable. "People always say it reminds them of a soothing spa treatment … pretty funny but that shows just how refreshing the Cucumberous is," said bar manager Josh Sullivan.
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