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By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Contributing Writer | December 27, 1992
Although caviar and smoked salmon have a strong following, I think the most popular holiday food may be icy jumbo shrimp.Shrimp are graded by the number of pieces in a pound, and packed accordingly. Shrimp marked "U-10" means there are fewer than 10 shrimp per pound, while those marked "26-30" have more and smaller shrimp per pound.Store shrimp on a cake rack in a pan. Place plastic wrap over the shrimp, then cover with flaked ice. Drain occasionally and refill with ice as necessary.Even if you're not serving them for several days, cook them in the shell and refrigerate in an airtight container, peeling just before serving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
J. Paul's has embraced its location. The Harborplace restaurant, which originally opened in 1997, reopened last June after an eight-month renovation. With six months under its belt, the revamped restaurant's food is mostly on point, but the staff still seems to be working out a few kinks. The space is smaller than it was before, but open, airy and noticeably nautical. With ropes here and shiny metal ship fixtures there, the room is welcoming, if a bit too bright. Right now, the restaurant's white walls and floors seem stark, but in the summer months, when floor-to-ceiling windows facing the water open out to the harbor, those touches will likely feel fresh.
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FEATURES
May 15, 1991
Hometown and presidential favorites are among the eats Queen Elizabeth II will be offered at team owner Eli Jacobs' pre-game reception tonight at Memorial Stadium.Here's the complete menu:HORS D'OEUVRESPetite Maryland crab cakes with Grand Marniercocktail sauceKosher franks in a blanketChicken croquettesVermont Cheddar puffsNorwegian smoked salmon and creme fraicheon black Russian ryePASTATomato tortelliniGarlic chicken, alfredo styleCARVINGBeef tenderloin roasted and seasoned with garlic,accompanied by Oregon truffle sauce,horseradish and pommery mustardRoasted blackened breast of turkey with sun-driedtomato aioliAssorted multi-grain rollsDESSERTFresh fruitProfiteroles filled with coffee ice creamWarm bittersweet chocolate sauceFresh hot popcorn
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Maybe it is the bright lights on its facade, or the vivid colors of the dining room walls, or Sinatra crooning over its sound system. Whatever the reason, Tony's Diner reminds me of dining in an Atlantic City hotel. First a note on the restaurant's exterior: It is cool. At night, seven pillars of colored lights wash the upper reaches of the restaurant's front. The lights slowly change colors. This brightens a stretch of Park Avenue just north of 1st Mariner Arena and blends in nicely with the neon glow of a sign reading "Tony's Diner."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 15, 2004
Arts and oysters in Canton What: Canton Arts and Antique Market and raw oysters at Mama's on the Half Shell. Where: the corner of Boston Street and South Clinton Street. When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday Why: Because you and your sweetie can hunt for one-of-a-kind items and other local treasures at this all-day outdoor bazaar - and admission won't cost you a dime. After you've perused all those mounds of kitschy trinkets, head to Canton Square's new seafood house, Mama's on the Half Shell.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Experiencing crabs is definitely the best way to understand them, cookbook author John Shields -- and almost every other citizen of the Chesapeake region -- will agree. Here are three recipes from Mr. Shields' latest book, "The Chesapeake Bay Crab Cookbook" (Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., Inc., 1992, $10.95. Photographs in the book are by Baltimore Sun photographer Jed Kirschbaum.)In the introduction to this recipe, which is from Little Italy resident Dolores Keh, Mr. Shields notes:"Dolores suggests serving these wonderful stuffed shrimp with a tangy cocktail sauce, macaroni and cheese, steamed broccoli and corn bread.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Shopping my neighborhood farmers' market is as much a part of my Saturday mornings as sipping a large latte. Taking an early morning stroll through the displays of fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs puts me in a food frame of mind for the rest of the day. And that's beneficial because I often stock up on produce before I know what I'm cooking during the week. As I stop for my morning coffee, I can decide what to do with my bounty. I know that herbs will go on everything from the breakfast eggs to a homemade dessert sorbet.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 8, 2000
Sometimes a bar is just a bar. And that's not necessarily a bad thing, even when it's been gentrified. Case in point: the Mt. Washington Tavern, which is becoming a Baltimore institution by virtue of the fact that so many of the other Baltimore institutions (at least the restaurants) are dying off. Of course, if you want to be technical about it, the tavern is more than a bar. It has a handsome atrium dining room that serves up steak Diane and mesquite-grilled swordfish. There's a wine list.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
Here's the buzz: For 17-year cicadas in Maryland, the party this year is in Calvert and St. Mary's counties.Residents say those counties have been ringing with the creatures' mating songs for about two weeks. Most people are tolerating them. A few have eaten them as treats, baked and dipped in cocktail sauce or chocolate."They're pretty loud in the wooded areas," said state police Sgt. Ray Smiley, who works at the Prince Frederick barracks in Calvert County."It's a constant singing, like a buzzing," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Maybe it is the bright lights on its facade, or the vivid colors of the dining room walls, or Sinatra crooning over its sound system. Whatever the reason, Tony's Diner reminds me of dining in an Atlantic City hotel. First a note on the restaurant's exterior: It is cool. At night, seven pillars of colored lights wash the upper reaches of the restaurant's front. The lights slowly change colors. This brightens a stretch of Park Avenue just north of 1st Mariner Arena and blends in nicely with the neon glow of a sign reading "Tony's Diner."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 15, 2004
Arts and oysters in Canton What: Canton Arts and Antique Market and raw oysters at Mama's on the Half Shell. Where: the corner of Boston Street and South Clinton Street. When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday Why: Because you and your sweetie can hunt for one-of-a-kind items and other local treasures at this all-day outdoor bazaar - and admission won't cost you a dime. After you've perused all those mounds of kitschy trinkets, head to Canton Square's new seafood house, Mama's on the Half Shell.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 4, 2004
The last time I stood at a meat counter trying to decide if I could afford a pound of hamburger, I found myself wondering how soaring beef prices were affecting upscale steakhouses. The answer, judging from our evening at Shula's, is not much. I didn't see any empty tables the weeknight we were there, even though prices have skyrocketed since my last visit six years ago. This is the local branch of the Florida-based chain named after NFL Hall of Famer Don Shula, who played and coached here in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
Charles D. Allen of Reading, Vt., wrote that he wanted a recipe for clam cakes or clam balls. "I got hooked on them when I lived in Providence, R.I., and they were as popular as french fries or onion rings. They are fried balls of bread dough with minced clams in them. I can't find the recipe and would appreciate your help." Blair Brennan Slaughter of Hunt Valley responded. She wrote: "I am a native Rhode Islander living in Maryland, so I had to respond to the request for clam cakes. "When I first served my Maryland-native husband clam cakes he was appalled, as they are the antithesis of crab cakes.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Shopping my neighborhood farmers' market is as much a part of my Saturday mornings as sipping a large latte. Taking an early morning stroll through the displays of fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs puts me in a food frame of mind for the rest of the day. And that's beneficial because I often stock up on produce before I know what I'm cooking during the week. As I stop for my morning coffee, I can decide what to do with my bounty. I know that herbs will go on everything from the breakfast eggs to a homemade dessert sorbet.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 8, 2000
Sometimes a bar is just a bar. And that's not necessarily a bad thing, even when it's been gentrified. Case in point: the Mt. Washington Tavern, which is becoming a Baltimore institution by virtue of the fact that so many of the other Baltimore institutions (at least the restaurants) are dying off. Of course, if you want to be technical about it, the tavern is more than a bar. It has a handsome atrium dining room that serves up steak Diane and mesquite-grilled swordfish. There's a wine list.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
Here's the buzz: For 17-year cicadas in Maryland, the party this year is in Calvert and St. Mary's counties.Residents say those counties have been ringing with the creatures' mating songs for about two weeks. Most people are tolerating them. A few have eaten them as treats, baked and dipped in cocktail sauce or chocolate."They're pretty loud in the wooded areas," said state police Sgt. Ray Smiley, who works at the Prince Frederick barracks in Calvert County."It's a constant singing, like a buzzing," he said.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
Charles D. Allen of Reading, Vt., wrote that he wanted a recipe for clam cakes or clam balls. "I got hooked on them when I lived in Providence, R.I., and they were as popular as french fries or onion rings. They are fried balls of bread dough with minced clams in them. I can't find the recipe and would appreciate your help." Blair Brennan Slaughter of Hunt Valley responded. She wrote: "I am a native Rhode Islander living in Maryland, so I had to respond to the request for clam cakes. "When I first served my Maryland-native husband clam cakes he was appalled, as they are the antithesis of crab cakes.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 6, 1994
Timbuktu, 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover, (410) 796-0733. Open Mondays to Saturdays for lunch and dinner, Sundays for dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $6.95-$7.95; entrees, $8.95-$28.95. No, it's not the town on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. It's a big, sprawling restaurant near BWI Airport, where the most exotic food on the menu is probably the manicotti.And surely the owners didn't name their restaurant Timbuktu to suggest that it's hard to get to. (According to the menu, the main access to the city in the Republic of Mali is by camel.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Contributing Writer | December 27, 1992
Although caviar and smoked salmon have a strong following, I think the most popular holiday food may be icy jumbo shrimp.Shrimp are graded by the number of pieces in a pound, and packed accordingly. Shrimp marked "U-10" means there are fewer than 10 shrimp per pound, while those marked "26-30" have more and smaller shrimp per pound.Store shrimp on a cake rack in a pan. Place plastic wrap over the shrimp, then cover with flaked ice. Drain occasionally and refill with ice as necessary.Even if you're not serving them for several days, cook them in the shell and refrigerate in an airtight container, peeling just before serving.
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