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NEWS
November 25, 2010
Ah, Thanksgiving. Has there ever been a year when we truly needed a break from the constant carping that has become our national sport? Just for today, let's leave it to the cable TV barkers and the online posters to make sure that everything that's wrong with the world gets duly noted. You can even re-join them on Friday. But for today, let's give credit where it's due. I'll even start. Here are 23 things I'm thankful for: •The prospect of seeing all those plastic bags that currently get tangled in trees instead impaled on the spikes of the scary sculpture Pat Turner wants to erect in Westport.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
How can I get rid of cockroaches? I keep my apartment clean, sprinkled Borax and tried sticky traps, but they're still here. Sticky traps help monitor roaches but can't solve the problem. And Borax is not the same as boric acid, a powder available at drugstores, which can be puffed into cracks and crevices, such as baseboards or between floorboards, to kill roaches. Roaches are thigmatic, meaning they like tight places. They are champs at squeezing in. Remove stashes of paper shopping bags (roaches also seem to like the glue)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A national study has conclusively shown that allergic reaction to cockroaches is a major cause of the high level of asthma in children in inner cities, researchers said yesterday.A five-year federally financed study conducted at eight medical centers in seven cities -- including Baltimore -- concluded, as experts had long suspected, that children are at high risk of asthma attacks if they are allergic to cockroaches and their homes show high levels of the insects' body parts and droppings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Last week, protesters chanted, "Hey hey, ho ho, let's shut down this racist show" outside of a New Haven, Conn., music venue. Their target was Ted Nugent, the 64-year-old rock 'n' roll guitarist from Detroit whose brash demeanor and conservative views have garnered him more headlines than his music has in recent years. The protesters were upset by a column Nugent had penned for a conservative website last month about the George Zimmerman verdict. In the column, Nugent fully supported the jury's verdict and called Trayvon Martin a "17-year-old dope smoking, racist gangsta wannabe.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1990
An army of architects, immunologists, epidemiologists and medical anthropologists has begun an ambitious attack on a ubiquitous plague: cockroaches.The bane of urban dwellers, the cockroach has long been implicated in spreading disease-causing microbes to people by contaminating food or cooking utensils. But now scientists are finding that 10 million to 15 million Americans are allergic to cockroaches.And researchers say the problem is getting worse.Reactions range from a runny nose and skin irritation to difficulty breathing.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
It wasn't chemistry that brought together Corinne Parks and Lloyd Tydings, but entomology.The friends not only see eye to eye with each other, but with New Guinea stick insects, fuzzy tarantulas, Madagascar hissing cockroaches and other esteemed members of the phylum Arthropoda, which includes all invertebrates with jointed limbs, segmented bodies and exoskeletons.Neither Parks nor Tydings thinks twice about clutching creepy crawlies or keeping black widows as pets. But when an Australian stick insect lays a seed-like egg from its pyracantha perch, the "two bugs in a rug" are thrilled to pieces.
NEWS
By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
A Joppatowne rubble landfill that has been combating an infestation of cockroaches since August has reopened. State Department of the Environment administrators declared the rubble fill on Oak Avenue to be roach-free.But some nearby residents, whose homes were invaded bythe roaches, say they are worried that spring temperatures will result in a new infestation.Some homes were infested with American cockroaches when the bugs migrated as land at the Pappy Inc. rubble landfill was cleared to make way for the rubble dump.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
The stuff in catnip that intoxicates tabbies repels cockroaches 100 times better than a powerful insect repellent, scientists said yesterday.The discovery could lead to new nontoxic methods for curbing these tenacious insects, which are more than just a nuisance.Roach infestations have been linked to rising rates of asthma among children in Baltimore and other inner cities."We've been chasing cockroach treatments for three years," says Dr. Peyton Eggleston, professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 15, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- The tall, gaunt man sat nervously fingering a rosary in the Baghdad airport, waiting for what he feared would be the last flight out before war.Beside him was a small, worn canvas bag with all that he owned. And two scuffed squash rackets.He had not chosen this last moment to leave Baghdad, he said hesitantly. His British accent barely audible, he explained he could not go earlier. He was in jail.He was the last Western hostage to leave Iraq.Patrick Trigg was held for 120 days of solitary confinement and interrogation after he was caught trying to escape across the border.
NEWS
By David Grimes | July 16, 1998
IT'S A BAD time for journalists, some of whom have recently been fired for making up quotes or inventing sources.A Boston Globe columnist who was fired for making stuff up wrote a final column explaining her actions and apologizing to her readers, more or less.It is just a matter of time before management discovers that my column has been an unbroken string of lies, fabrications and blatant exaggerations since its debut in 1984 (Or was it 1983? Ah, who cares). I figure I may as well write my apology now in case my heave-ho is too sudden to allow for explanations.
NEWS
November 25, 2010
Ah, Thanksgiving. Has there ever been a year when we truly needed a break from the constant carping that has become our national sport? Just for today, let's leave it to the cable TV barkers and the online posters to make sure that everything that's wrong with the world gets duly noted. You can even re-join them on Friday. But for today, let's give credit where it's due. I'll even start. Here are 23 things I'm thankful for: •The prospect of seeing all those plastic bags that currently get tangled in trees instead impaled on the spikes of the scary sculpture Pat Turner wants to erect in Westport.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
If you see a Madagascar hissing cockroach, call Baltimore police. The same goes for six turtles (one Eastern box, two northern maps and three red-ear sliders), two geckos (a gargoyle and a tangerine flat-tail) and a beloved 3-foot-long iguana named Zena. These are among the exotic wildlife stolen over the weekend during a break in at the city's Carrie Murray Nature Center in West Baltimore's Leakin Park, according to a police report filed Monday. Most of the animals were donated to the center after having been abused.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | October 15, 2000
According to a recent newspaper article that I carefully clipped out and then lost but remember the gist of, traffic gridlock in the United States is very bad. It's getting to the point where many commuters arrive at work, use the bathroom, then immediately begin commuting home. Fact: The average American commuter whose car radio is tuned to a "Classic Rock" station spends more time singing along to the Kiss song "Rock And Roll All Nite" than talking with his or her spouse. Fact: I made the preceding fact up, but for all we know it could be true.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2000
VOLUNTEERS ARE frequently obliged to hide under their beds, lurk in the shadows, peek around corners. No matter how well they conceal themselves, they know that when the call comes -- "Can you help with such-and-such?" -- something inside them will scream, "Yes! Yes! Don't hold me back!" They know they will be summoned to a firehouse, school or some such place where something vital -- yet another meeting -- will take place. One group of volunteers who are eager to meet lack a place to meet in. They are the folks of the Chesapeake Children's Museum.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
It wasn't chemistry that brought together Corinne Parks and Lloyd Tydings, but entomology.The friends not only see eye to eye with each other, but with New Guinea stick insects, fuzzy tarantulas, Madagascar hissing cockroaches and other esteemed members of the phylum Arthropoda, which includes all invertebrates with jointed limbs, segmented bodies and exoskeletons.Neither Parks nor Tydings thinks twice about clutching creepy crawlies or keeping black widows as pets. But when an Australian stick insect lays a seed-like egg from its pyracantha perch, the "two bugs in a rug" are thrilled to pieces.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1999
THE FIRST Thunder Hill Open Space Fair on Sunday drew more than 100 families. They came to walk, talk and play in the neighborhood parkland.Activities and demonstrations were spread over a quarter-mile of meandering paths and through a hollow edged with trees behind the Thunder Hill neighborhood center."
FEATURES
By Fred Tasker and Fred Tasker,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 17, 1992
Don't, OH, DON'T invite Greg Jefferys to your cocktail party.He'll start regaling your guests with his little cockroach facts. He'll tell them that:* Cockroaches' favorite dining place is your bathroom, where they like to suck the sweet-tasting toothpaste out of your toothbrush.* Cockroaches carry 50 viruses, allergens and bacteria and cause tuberculosis, salmonella, cholera, dysentery, intestinal round worm, hay fever, asthma and dermatitis.* Cockroaches have been around for 250 million years and are probably the only life form that could survive a nuclear holocaust.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Contributing writer | December 9, 1990
Residents were turned away from a meeting in Joppatowne Thursday at which they sought answers about cockroach infestation from a nearby rubble fill.A handful of residents turned out at Towne Baptist Church on Trimble Road for an update on efforts by Pappy's Inc., which owns the Oak Avenue rubble fill, to curb cockroaches infesting nearby homes since August.Instead, they were told the meeting was closed to the public and were turned away by a state administrator and citizen members of the committee, formed to study the problem.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
The stuff in catnip that intoxicates tabbies repels cockroaches 100 times better than a powerful insect repellent, scientists said yesterday.The discovery could lead to new nontoxic methods for curbing these tenacious insects, which are more than just a nuisance.Roach infestations have been linked to rising rates of asthma among children in Baltimore and other inner cities."We've been chasing cockroach treatments for three years," says Dr. Peyton Eggleston, professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Isabel Mangana was a steamboat captain, a New York fashion model and a Pablo Picasso protege all in one day. It was more than she expected from a trip to the museum."
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