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By New York Times News Service | November 3, 1994
MERRILLVILLE, Ind. -- The American Eagle plane that crashed Monday night took an unexplained dip to the right, recovered, dipped again and turned upside down just before it plunged to the ground, killing all 68 people aboard, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said at a briefing last night.Data from the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder from Flight 4184 showed that the plane began descending probably in response to instruction radioed to the pilots from the ground.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 21, 1999
CAIRO, Egypt -- Even if U.S. investigators come up with proof that a suicidal pilot deliberately plunged EgyptAir Flight 990 into the Atlantic on Oct. 31, it's hard to imagine they would ever convince the Egyptian people.Prodded by an outraged press, Egyptians of all walks of life are ready to believe that the crash resulted from a foreign conspiracy, a bomb or a technical failure -- almost anything but a murder-suicide by relief pilot Gameel el-Batouty.The attitude was summed up Friday by a cartoon in the semiofficial newspaper Al Ahram with the caption: "I could believe the plane was hit by a minibus -- but I don't believe what America is saying."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1999
Navy searchers said yesterday that they had definitively determined the location of the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder from EgyptAir Flight 990.The discovery is essential in learning why the Boeing 767 plummeted into the Atlantic Ocean off New England early Sunday, killing all 217 people aboard.Investigators provided further details last night about the aircraft's final moments. Once something went wrong, they said, the twin-engine jet began a tortured and ever-faster descent that exceeded 660 mph. Radar sweeps tracking the aircraft's plunge from Nantucket Island show that in the last 37 seconds of its flight, the plane twisted away from its assigned northeast heading in a long, right-hand turn.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1999
Navy searchers said yesterday that they had definitively determined the location of the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder from EgyptAir Flight 990.The discovery is essential in learning why the Boeing 767 plummeted into the Atlantic Ocean off New England early Sunday, killing all 217 people aboard.Investigators provided further details last night about the aircraft's final moments. Once something went wrong, they said, the twin-engine jet began a tortured and ever-faster descent that exceeded 660 mph. Radar sweeps tracking the aircraft's plunge from Nantucket Island show that in the last 37 seconds of its flight, the plane twisted away from its assigned northeast heading in a long, right-hand turn.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 21, 1999
CAIRO, Egypt -- Even if U.S. investigators come up with proof that a suicidal pilot deliberately plunged EgyptAir Flight 990 into the Atlantic on Oct. 31, it's hard to imagine they would ever convince the Egyptian people.Prodded by an outraged press, Egyptians of all walks of life are ready to believe that the crash resulted from a foreign conspiracy, a bomb or a technical failure -- almost anything but a murder-suicide by relief pilot Gameel el-Batouty.The attitude was summed up Friday by a cartoon in the semiofficial newspaper Al Ahram with the caption: "I could believe the plane was hit by a minibus -- but I don't believe what America is saying."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 1999
DALLAS -- The cockpit voice recorder from golfer Payne Stewart's Learjet has confirmed what investigators suspected: Stewart and five others aboard likely died from lack of oxygen because the airplane lost cabin pressure. The cockpit voice recorder, which picked up the last 30 minutes of sound inside the cabin, contained no voices, but there are sounds consistent with various alarms for cabin pressure and stall warnings, the National Transportation Safety Board stated yesterday.
NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and R. Alonso-Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Three hours before the plane crash that killed Minnesota Sen. Paul Wellstone last fall, the pilot nearly canceled the flight because of poor weather, federal investigators disclosed yesterday. "OK, ah, you know what?" pilot Richard Conry told a Federal Aviation Administration weather specialist. "I don't think I'm going to take this flight." But an hour later, after determining that the snowy weather had improved and met acceptable conditions for flying, Conry decided to press on. The National Transportation Safety Board has not established a cause for the crash Oct. 25, which occurred days before the November elections.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Egyptian government escalated yesterday its condemnation of U.S. officials investigating the EgyptAir crash, saying that, by focusing suspicion on a backup pilot, they were rushing to judgment about the cause.Egypt's principal spokesman said that a statement attributed to a relief pilot in the cockpit was being misinterpreted and did not show that he was about to commit suicide by sending the plane into the Atlantic.The criticism came as a federal official said that aviation investigators were unsure of the significance of the utterance, in Arabic, by the relief pilot as captured on the cockpit voice recorder in the seconds before the Boeing 767 crashed into the sea, killing all 217 on board Oct. 31. The chief spokesman for the Egyptian government, Nabil Osman, said in a telephone interview in Cairo that the words that investigators believe had been uttered by the relief pilot, Gameel el-Batouty, was a Muslim prayer "said in a time of crisis when a person is facing a difficult situation."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 27, 1996
SMITHTOWN, N.Y. -- Radar records show that TWA Flight 800 apparently continued to fly for at least 24 seconds after the cataclysmic event that doomed it, raising the possibility that some of the passengers and crew may have been alive in the last horrifying seconds before the crippled jet broke apart in a fireball, investigators said yesterday.The radar information does not give a clue as to whether the cockpit crew had any functioning controls to work with after the plane was disabled at 13,700 feet by either a mechanical problem, a bomb or a missile -- investigators still do not know which.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Less than six minutes after ValuJet Flight 592 took off from Miami International Airport, someone opened the cockpit door to tell the apparently unsuspecting pilots about a fire in the passenger cabin of the DC-9.National Transportation Safety Board Vice Chairman Robert Francis offered that account yesterday after a team of experts gave a preliminary listen to scratchy voices captured on the cockpit voice recorder during the final moments before the flight crashed into the Everglades May 11."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 3, 1994
MERRILLVILLE, Ind. -- The American Eagle plane that crashed Monday night took an unexplained dip to the right, recovered, dipped again and turned upside down just before it plunged to the ground, killing all 68 people aboard, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said at a briefing last night.Data from the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder from Flight 4184 showed that the plane began descending probably in response to instruction radioed to the pilots from the ground.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Hoping to learn how fire doomed ValuJet Flight 592, federal investigators will re-create a raging blaze in another airplane's cargo bay today and tomorrow.They will load cardboard boxes of oxygen-generating canisters and some inflated tires into the mock-up, the items that were in Flight 592's forward cargo hold.Then, some of the oxygen canisters, which can heat up to 500 degrees, will be activated.They are suspected of either starting or feeding Flight 592's fire.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Government officials said yesterday evening that the National Transportation Safety Board was considering asking the FBI to take over the case of EgyptAir Flight 990, after a review of the plane's cockpit voice recorder.The officials said they were focusing on a cryptic utterance, possibly a prayer, that they indicated might be the last words of a pilot determined to destroy himself and the airplane.The plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Nantucket, Mass., two weeks ago, killing all 217 people on board.
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