Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCockney
IN THE NEWS

Cockney

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser | June 26, 1992
Where did Baltimorese come from? There seems to be no definitive answer.Gordon Beard, a retired Associated Press reporter and native "Balmoron," wrote two guides on the subject: "Basic Baltimorese" in 1979 and "Basic Baltimorese II" in 1990. He wrote:"Linguists and scholars have argued for years over its derivation and have suggested various blends of Virginia Southern, Pennsylvania Dutch, Brooklynese, Allegheny Mountain English, Irish and British Cockney."John Goodspeed, author for 16 years of "Mr. Peep's Diary," a local feature in The Evening Sun that often dealt with language, says Baltimorese is an odd mixture of Cockney, Pennsylvania Dutch and "a little bit of Southern thrown in there, too."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
Annapolis Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is the best show seen in many a moon at the theater under the stars. Running through the season's close on Aug. 30, this production is extraordinarily well-staged and well-paced. Most important -- Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is faithful to Lerner and Loewe's mission to preserve the wit of Pygmalion, the George Bernard Shaw play on which the musical is based. Committed to delivering a classic interpretation of this musical that debuted on Broadway in 1956, director Douglas Kotula has assembled a first-rate cast that shares his commitment.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 3, 2003
Schott's Original Miscellany, by Ben Schott. Bloomsbury. 144 pages. $14.95. An enormous best seller in Britain, this quirky, serious, ridiculous, narcotic volume is a repository of the sort of wide-ranging fact that is too often trivialized as trivia. I have no idea where else, if anywhere short of a research library, you might find within easy reach a list of 43 phobias, (e.g., philematophobia -- fear of kissing), the identities of all multiple Nobel Prize winners (four people, two institutions)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 3, 2003
Schott's Original Miscellany, by Ben Schott. Bloomsbury. 144 pages. $14.95. An enormous best seller in Britain, this quirky, serious, ridiculous, narcotic volume is a repository of the sort of wide-ranging fact that is too often trivialized as trivia. I have no idea where else, if anywhere short of a research library, you might find within easy reach a list of 43 phobias, (e.g., philematophobia -- fear of kissing), the identities of all multiple Nobel Prize winners (four people, two institutions)
NEWS
By Edna Stumpf and Edna Stumpf,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | May 14, 1995
"The Trial of Elizabeth Cree,"by Peter Ackroyd. 261 pages. New York: Doubleday, $22This book is a bit of a potboiler, a brisk cockney boil-up of Holmesian gore and decor, shattered personalities, hobnobbing celebrities and cross-dressing. It's not market-tested, one hardly expects it to have a soul. Still, in its injured and injurious heroine, it does.Ackroyd's brilliant displaying of stagecraft as Lizzie's religion, occasion of sin, means of punishment, death and redemption (ancient literary links to church and court are acknowledged)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
Annapolis Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is the best show seen in many a moon at the theater under the stars. Running through the season's close on Aug. 30, this production is extraordinarily well-staged and well-paced. Most important -- Summer Garden's My Fair Lady is faithful to Lerner and Loewe's mission to preserve the wit of Pygmalion, the George Bernard Shaw play on which the musical is based. Committed to delivering a classic interpretation of this musical that debuted on Broadway in 1956, director Douglas Kotula has assembled a first-rate cast that shares his commitment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 25, 1994
No one would ever accuse "My Fair Lady" of being light on its feet, and the restored version of the 3 1/2 -hour 1964 behemoth that has just opened on the big screen at the Senator sometimes feels like an attack by the Third Armored Division with full air and artillery support. Still, it packs considerable entertainment wallop.Adapted from the famous Lerner-Loewe musical of the '50s, which itself was adapted from George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," the movie was directed by the elderly George Cukor, a specialist in "women's pictures."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 15, 1993
He has been a noble, young doctor at Blair General, a troubled priest in Australia and a brave adventurer in old Japan. But a fussy, confirmed old English bachelor who shouts at women -- and sings and dances?Dr. Kildare, Father Ralph from "The Thorn Birds" and Blackthorne the Shogun will all be singing "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face.""It's my favorite song," said Richard Chamberlain. "I also do the waltz."That's right, the unfailingly charming and durably handsome actor, often called the king of the miniseries, is stepping out on the musical comedy stage for the first time in 27 years to play the superstar role of Professor Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 1995
The Maryland Senate opened its legislative session Wednesday with the traditional flurry of bon mots, high-rite schmoozing and back-patting. Many of the comments were undoubtedly heartfelt, but when you get several dozen politicians in the same room before an audience of friends and family, they can lay the sweet rhetoric on with a trowel.Or maybe a shovel.At one time or another, the solons described each other, their guests or the Senate itself as "illustrious," "considerate," "compassionate," "caring," "special," "talented," "able," "dear," "dedicated," "enthusiastic," "beautiful," "distinguished" and "fine."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lorena Blas | May 19, 2005
Address: / / rinkworks.com / dialect / What's the point?: The Dialectizer takes text or other Web pages and instantly creates parodies of them. Try it out by selecting a dialect, then entering a URL or English text in the field provided. Among the "dialect" selections are Elmer Fudd, Pig Latin, Swedish chef and Cockney. What to look for?: Try out all the dialects on some serious Web sites. Also, try out the "dialectize text" feature and type in a phrase from a news story. Elmer Fudd is a favorite.
NEWS
By Edna Stumpf and Edna Stumpf,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | May 14, 1995
"The Trial of Elizabeth Cree,"by Peter Ackroyd. 261 pages. New York: Doubleday, $22This book is a bit of a potboiler, a brisk cockney boil-up of Holmesian gore and decor, shattered personalities, hobnobbing celebrities and cross-dressing. It's not market-tested, one hardly expects it to have a soul. Still, in its injured and injurious heroine, it does.Ackroyd's brilliant displaying of stagecraft as Lizzie's religion, occasion of sin, means of punishment, death and redemption (ancient literary links to church and court are acknowledged)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 1995
The Maryland Senate opened its legislative session Wednesday with the traditional flurry of bon mots, high-rite schmoozing and back-patting. Many of the comments were undoubtedly heartfelt, but when you get several dozen politicians in the same room before an audience of friends and family, they can lay the sweet rhetoric on with a trowel.Or maybe a shovel.At one time or another, the solons described each other, their guests or the Senate itself as "illustrious," "considerate," "compassionate," "caring," "special," "talented," "able," "dear," "dedicated," "enthusiastic," "beautiful," "distinguished" and "fine."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 25, 1994
No one would ever accuse "My Fair Lady" of being light on its feet, and the restored version of the 3 1/2 -hour 1964 behemoth that has just opened on the big screen at the Senator sometimes feels like an attack by the Third Armored Division with full air and artillery support. Still, it packs considerable entertainment wallop.Adapted from the famous Lerner-Loewe musical of the '50s, which itself was adapted from George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," the movie was directed by the elderly George Cukor, a specialist in "women's pictures."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 15, 1993
He has been a noble, young doctor at Blair General, a troubled priest in Australia and a brave adventurer in old Japan. But a fussy, confirmed old English bachelor who shouts at women -- and sings and dances?Dr. Kildare, Father Ralph from "The Thorn Birds" and Blackthorne the Shogun will all be singing "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face.""It's my favorite song," said Richard Chamberlain. "I also do the waltz."That's right, the unfailingly charming and durably handsome actor, often called the king of the miniseries, is stepping out on the musical comedy stage for the first time in 27 years to play the superstar role of Professor Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady."
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser | June 26, 1992
Where did Baltimorese come from? There seems to be no definitive answer.Gordon Beard, a retired Associated Press reporter and native "Balmoron," wrote two guides on the subject: "Basic Baltimorese" in 1979 and "Basic Baltimorese II" in 1990. He wrote:"Linguists and scholars have argued for years over its derivation and have suggested various blends of Virginia Southern, Pennsylvania Dutch, Brooklynese, Allegheny Mountain English, Irish and British Cockney."John Goodspeed, author for 16 years of "Mr. Peep's Diary," a local feature in The Evening Sun that often dealt with language, says Baltimorese is an odd mixture of Cockney, Pennsylvania Dutch and "a little bit of Southern thrown in there, too."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 7, 2008
The gritty heist picture The Bank Job has everything adult action fans could want, starting with a grand, fact-inspired gimmick. We're in swinging England, 1971. To defuse or destroy blackmail photographs of Princess Margaret cavorting in the Caribbean, a slick British secret agent, Tim Everett (Richard Lintern), devises a cocky plan. He coerces a Cockney beauty in a jam, an ex-model named Martine Love (Saffron Burrows), to get a crew of her old friends and local "villains" to rob a Lloyd's Bank in central London.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
For legions of musical theater fans, Lerner and Loewe's "My Fair Lady" is the fairest of them all. Written in 1956, this musical based on George Bernard Shaw's play "Pygmalion" is a witty exploration of altering class distinctions by acquiring proper speech. In the production running through April 23, the cast delivers all that is required, and more, to make "My Fair Lady" one of the best shows ever at Chesapeake Music Hall. The play opens outside Covent Garden, where Professor Henry Higgins takes notes on cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle's speech patterns.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.