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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 26, 1991
YOUR grandmother and quite probably her grandmother made cobblers every summer -- and with good reason. This simple, old-fashioned dessert is a delicious way to use whatever seasonal fruits you might have on hand. Slightly mushy fruit are OK.The dessert goes together quickly, but be sure to allow enough time to peel, chop and pit the fruit. The cobbler keeps well and the recipe is easy to double so I always make two.This recipe is from a new book: "Bradley Ogden's Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner" by Bradley Ogden; Random House dInc.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | March 4, 2014
Nestled in an old Korean office building adjacent to a vacant lot resides Gold Bar, one of Baltimore's newer establishments. Gold Bar serves as a sister bar to highly regarded the Crown - right across the hall but with a measured difference in atmosphere (more rock-show oriented). Gold Bar offers its own eclectic mix of live music, craft cocktails, and ... Asian cuisine (sure, why not?). Dimly lit, sparsely decorated and DIY to the core, what better place to enjoy a whiskey-loaded fruit cocktail, right?
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
Just talking about a wonderful aroma can't come anywhere near the experience of the one that will fill the house when peach cobbler or peach cake is baking. You all but taste it in the air. Quick and easy to make, these are favorites of many.M. L. W. of Baltimore requested the two recipes and Lynda Morrison of Baltimore responded with Chef Gilles Syglowski's choice for peach cobbler. She wrote, "I make it often and I love it. Also, there are only a few dishes to wash and it doesn't require eggs or a mixer."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Billie Insley sits in a red leatherette chair at Your Shoe Service in Linthicum, smoking a Wave cigarette and facing a stack of stuff packed for moving or disposal: sheets of leather, boxes of fresh heels and soles, some bearing the red-and-black label of the old Cat's Paw Rubber Co. His life's work is nearly done. In a matter of days, they'll take out the last of the heavy stitching, sanding and polishing machines that have been here as long as he has, since Dwight D. Eisenhower was president and the Baltimore Orioles were the newest thing in the American League.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2002
When it comes to summer desserts, the cobbler is king. This old-time fruit dessert topped with dough is effortless to prepare on hot days and serves as the perfect vehicle to showcase the summer's harvest. Nature has blessed the cobbler's essential ingredient - fruit - this year. Peaches are praiseworthy, blueberries and blackberries are bursting with flavor. What do we have to thank? Our prolonged dry spell. "Most of Maryland is suffering a drought, and that tends to be good for fruit flavor because it concentrates the sugar in the fruit," says Tony Evans, who coordinates the Farmers' Market Program for the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 23, 1991
Cobbler & Cleaners Inc., the Baltimore area shoe repair and dry cleaning chain, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.At one time Cobbler & Cleaners was a chain of eight stores, including two shops downtown. The downtown stores still carry the Cobbler & Cleaners name but are not owned by the chain and are not part of the bankruptcy proceedings.The chain currently owns three stores with assets of $20,700 and debts of more than $700,000, according to a bankruptcy petition filed Wednesday by owners Henry B. Tucker and Mayta N. Tucker.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 3, 1997
It seems like a simple question: What do you call a dessert where you cover fruit with dough and bake it?But there are at least a dozen answers. You could be talking about cobblers or crisps. Slumps or grunts. Buckles or brambles. A betty, a crumble or a pandowdy. Or maybe just deep-dish pie.Simple, easy and quick to make, each is an old-fashioned, fruit-based dessert that lets you take advantage of the seasonal harvest. At this time of year, that includes so many possibilities, from peaches to blueberries.
FEATURES
By NANCY BAGGETT and NANCY BAGGETT,EATING WELL MAGAZINE | August 12, 1998
Think about cobblers and crumbles and you're sure to get an image of sweet, ripe, warm fruit bubbling around a rich, crusty topping - qualities that belie their essentially humble origins. The charm in these desserts is centered in the tradition of cooks who may have had limited resources but who were creative enough - and caring enough - to make recipes for their families that went beyond simple necessity.The economy in preparation is no less alluring today, of course, but the real delight is in their taste: One bite of a plum crumble or a raspberry-peach cobbler will make you forget the most artful and sophisticated of French pastries.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
Summer heat translates into the best ripe fruit of the season, and there's no better way to capture all the fruit flavor than a delicate clafouti.What exactly is a clafouti? First, it is pronounced "claw-foot-ee." France is the home of this fabulous baked fruit dessert. It's a sort of cobbler, but the pastry batter is mixed with the fruit rather than placed on top, as in the American cobbler.Pies are good dishes for using firm, textured fruit like apples, but for juicier, tree-ripened, tender fruit, clafouti is the best technique.
NEWS
April 25, 1995
Archbishop Mar Athanasius Yeshue Samuel, 87, the primate of the Syrian Orthodox Church of the United States, died April 16 of a heart attack in Lodi, N.J. His 1947 encounter with a Bethlehem cobbler bearing 2,000-year-old engraved leather pieces led to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls.Don Pullen, 53, an avant-garde jazz pianist who favored a percussive approach and sometimes played using his elbows and the backs of his hands, died Saturday of lymphoma in East Orange, N.J.@
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
It isn't spring until you have swallowed some rhubarb. That is the way fans of this tangy plant feel, myself included. As soon as the crimson stalks show up in area farmers markets and the produce sections of a few grocery stores, we start thinking of ways to enjoy its unique, sour flavor. We make strawberry rhubarb pies, rhubarb cobblers, rhubarb crunches. Yet the other day I journeyed into a rhubarb pleasure zone that I had never visited before: rhubarb beverages. On a recent bright spring afternoon, I found myself sitting at the bar of Vino Rosina, a stylish new restaurant and wine bar in the old Bagby Furniture building in Harbor East.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | June 6, 2007
Grunts, buckles, crumbles, crisps, cobblers and slumps are all lively ways of describing fresh, seasonal fruit bound to various degrees by batter, streusel or pastry. Though the cobbler can be the most involved of these to put together (which is to say it still doesn't take much work), William Carlile, a pastry chef instructor at Baltimore International College, thinks it's the prettiest. Little touches -- like putting the peaches in before the juices to prevent soaking the bottom crust -- help keep his cobbler from getting soggy in the heat.
NEWS
By RUSS PARSONS and RUSS PARSONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
Author David "Mas" Masumoto, a short, square 52-year-old with a quick smile and work-hardened hands, is probably the most famous fruit farmer in America. His peaches, which are almost entirely sold to restaurants and a few select markets, are featured by name on some of the finest menus in the country -- Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., the French Laundry in Napa Valley, Calif., and Per Se in Manhattan. The peaches, grown in California's Central Valley, have been selected for the "Ark of Taste" of fruits and vegetables recognized by the international organization Slow Food.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
LAUREL - Inside the warm and clattering workshop of A.M. Kroop & Sons, proprietor Randy Kroop will tell you, with pride, that hers is a decidedly un-modern enterprise. Molds and machines that her grandfather used in the 1920s are still cutting soles and stitching seams and crimping leather for the same kinds of boots that earned the Kroop name considerable renown, at least inside the exclusive coteries of the horse-racing trade. The waxed and polished wood, the enameled metal, the oily electric smell - all of it survives from two generations past.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2002
When it comes to summer desserts, the cobbler is king. This old-time fruit dessert topped with dough is effortless to prepare on hot days and serves as the perfect vehicle to showcase the summer's harvest. Nature has blessed the cobbler's essential ingredient - fruit - this year. Peaches are praiseworthy, blueberries and blackberries are bursting with flavor. What do we have to thank? Our prolonged dry spell. "Most of Maryland is suffering a drought, and that tends to be good for fruit flavor because it concentrates the sugar in the fruit," says Tony Evans, who coordinates the Farmers' Market Program for the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 2001
AS THE mother of three young children, Lisa Reveley is acutely aware of how easy it is to succumb to a fast-food dinner at the end of a long day. So, she decided to tackle the problem in a novel way; in September she opened a small cafeteria in Randallstown and started turning out traditional soul food. Symone's Soul Cafe serves very reasonably priced things dear to the heart of anyone who's lived in the South or grown up around a Southern cook. That's no surprise, because some of Reveley's recipes were handed down from her grandmother, a native of the Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By A.M. Chaplin | May 15, 1993
Kenny Rogers RoastersFestival at Woodholme Plaza, 1809 Reisterstown Road, Suite 155, Baltimore. Hours: Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-9.30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m.-10.30 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Phone: (410) 602-1212.When it comes to carryout, my husband tends to opt for dishes that swim in a sea of saturated grease, while I'd rather have something that will fit in my tank suit. But there is one place that can make us both happy: Kenny Rogers Roasters.The "roasters" refers to wood-roasted chicken, which, according to the menu, is significantly lower than the fried stuff in fat, sodium and calories.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | June 6, 2007
Grunts, buckles, crumbles, crisps, cobblers and slumps are all lively ways of describing fresh, seasonal fruit bound to various degrees by batter, streusel or pastry. Though the cobbler can be the most involved of these to put together (which is to say it still doesn't take much work), William Carlile, a pastry chef instructor at Baltimore International College, thinks it's the prettiest. Little touches -- like putting the peaches in before the juices to prevent soaking the bottom crust -- help keep his cobbler from getting soggy in the heat.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
Antoinette Pujia of Dunbar, Pa., wrote that she would be forever grateful for a peach cobbler recipe that was made with canned peaches. Her response came from Elsie Hegwood of Baltimore, whose recipe called for canned apricots and peaches. Just peaches may be used. She described the topping as "especially delicious." Peach Cobbler Serves 6-8 1/2 cup granulated sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 (one-pound) can sliced peaches, drained with juice reserved 1 (10 1/2 -ounce) can apricot halves, drained with juice reserved (or, all peaches may be used)
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