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By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | April 14, 1994
SEATTLE -- Rock singer Kurt Cobain was high on heroin and Valium when he killed himself April 5, three days before his body was discovered at his posh Seattle home.In a strange twist to the drama surrounding the Nirvana singer's death, police in Beverly Hills, Calif., reported yesterday that his wife, Courtney Love, was arrested on drug charges April 7 -- the day before his body was discovered.Police and fire officials were called to the luxurious Peninsula Hotel early that morning and treated Ms. Love for a suspected heroin overdose.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 2, 2007
Anyone who has ever had an inspiring and infuriating friend will find something to love about Old Joy, a spare, trembling lyric poem of a movie that uses stillness and facial blips the way melodramas use showdowns and action films big bangs. When two thirtysomething survivors of the Kurt Cobain era of disaffection, Kurt (Will Oldham) and Mark (Daniel London), take a trek through the Cascade Mountains outside Portland, Ore., they try to reheat a now-distant friendship. Old Joy (Kino International)
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FEATURES
By Gene Stout and Gene Stout,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 5, 1995
There's no rest for grunge-rock martyrs, as Courtney Love has discovered. She can't find a suitable place to bury the ashes of her late husband, Kurt Cobain, lead singer of Nirvana.Of the two Seattle cemeteries she has approached, one has turned her down, citing security concerns, and the other wants at least $100,000 a year to cover the costs of full-time security to protect the cemetery and grave site. That's in addition to a $75,000 tombstone the cemetery wants her to buy."I don't have that kind of money, and Kurt didn't have that kind of money," said Ms. Love, who sings for the band Hole.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2006
ABERDEEN, Wash. -- Downtown, the theater is long-shuttered, and the streets are empty at midday. A few businesses - a thrift shop, a tattoo parlor, a place to take out payday loans - fill some space. What seems to give Aberdeen a pulse are the shrines to the best-known product of this coastal town: the poet of despair, Kurt Cobain. As the lead singer and songwriter for Nirvana, Cobain shook up the popular music world in a few years of chaotic creativity and then fatally shot himself at his Seattle home.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 25, 1994
It's not often that popular music promises as much and delivers as little as it did in 1994.What in May looked to be a record-breaking year for concert tours wound up with some of the biggest names in rock -- including the rejuvenated Rolling Stones and the reunited Eagles -- playing to empty seats by September. Pearl Jam put itself on the sidelines with a well-meaning but so far ineffective fight against TicketMaster, while Woodstock, despite all the mud and hype, was not only a musical anticlimax but didn't even make as much money as expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1991: Martha Graham dies1992: Rush Limbaugh TV show1995: Jerry Garcia dies1994: Kurt Cobain commits suicide
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 15, 1994
It is a week now since the death of Kurt Cobain, who has already slipped into legend.Dying young is everything they say about being a great career move.Nirvana album sales are booming. And middle-aged social critics who knew little of Cobain or his music routinely call him the voice of a generation.Those most familiar with Cobain say that's everything he wouldn't have wanted. They say he hated the hype. He didn't want to be anyone's voice but his own, and a singularly anguished voice it was.But the thing about death is that you lose any rights to your future.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | December 4, 1994
Eddie Vedder pauses when asked if "Immortality," a song on the new Pearl Jam album about depression, was inspired by the suicide last April of Kurt Cobain.Mr. Vedder is the rock artist most closely compared to Cobain. Both have been hailed as key figures in a new generation of songwriters who reflect the alienation and anger among many young people today."Immortality," featured on the new "Vitalogy" album (the CD and cassette will be in stores Tuesday), includes lines that certainly sound as if they were inspired by Cobain's death.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 1, 1996
Although rock and roll has seen more than its share of tragedies, few were as genuinely unsettling as Kurt Cobain's suicide in April 1994.It wasn't just that he had been so desperate to opt out of rock stardom; what really left people reeling was the way his death seemed to underscore the despair running through his songs. For many commentators, Cobain was a symbol for his generation's lack of hope and self-esteem, and over time, his death became almost more important than the music he made with Nirvana.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 2, 2007
Anyone who has ever had an inspiring and infuriating friend will find something to love about Old Joy, a spare, trembling lyric poem of a movie that uses stillness and facial blips the way melodramas use showdowns and action films big bangs. When two thirtysomething survivors of the Kurt Cobain era of disaffection, Kurt (Will Oldham) and Mark (Daniel London), take a trek through the Cascade Mountains outside Portland, Ore., they try to reheat a now-distant friendship. Old Joy (Kino International)
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 1, 2004
How best does a city honor someone who felt like its least favored son? That's the question in Aberdeen, Wash., the small community on the Wishkah River where Kurt Cobain grew up. The rock star's accounts of his youth in the town might be best described as the march of a miserable outsider, but that has not deterred a group of locals who are pushing for a memorial to the singer who committed suicide a decade ago. The campaign led to a City Council session...
NEWS
By Eric R. Danton | April 6, 2004
KURT COBAIN was eulogized as the spokesman of a generation when he killed himself 10 years ago. The Nirvana front man's songs were hailed as the embodiment of the angst said to gnaw at members of Generation X, and his influence on popular music has been pegged at somewhere between immense and immeasurable. "Kurt was one of the masters of the craft, in addition to being a voice of adolescents of all ages," Danny Goldberg, a former Nirvana manager who later founded Artemis Records, told Spin magazine for its Cobain tribute issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Seymour and By Craig Seymour,New York Times News Service | November 3, 2002
ATLANTA -- It smells like teen spirit -- again. On Tuesday, a greatest-hits CD by the seminal 1990s rock act Nirvana hit music stores. And that's just the beginning of a revival of interest in the definitive grunge-era band and its tortured front man, the late Kurt Cobain. This week, Riverhead Books will release Journals, a much-anticipated collection of Cobain's unpublished diaries, memos, drawings, letters and other scribblings. Although this material was used extensively in Charles R. Cross' Heavier Than Heaven: A Biography of Kurt Cobain, the new book provides more of Cobain's firsthand accounts of his rise to fame, painful stomach condition and ambivalent feelings about success.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2002
The way it happened, you might have thought the ghost of Kurt Cobain had a hand in this thing, because who would give odds that Madison Smartt Bell, the novelist from Baltimore, would get his own recording contract to sing and play a Les Paul guitar with back-up from Don Dixon, the legendary producer who built successful careers for R.E.M., Marshall Crenshaw and the Smithereens? It shouldn't have happened. But it did. It's real. It's serious. And it started with a dream of Kurt Cobain.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1991: Martha Graham dies1992: Rush Limbaugh TV show1995: Jerry Garcia dies1994: Kurt Cobain commits suicide
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach The hills are alive | November 20, 1998
Yes, Todd Haynes realizes that Curt Wild, one of the main characters in his paean to the glam rock era, "Velvet Goldmine," is a dead ringer for Kurt Cobain.And no, that's not an effect he was going for -- the character was modeled after Iggy Pop."It was completely an accident," Haynes insists (as was the happenstance that his character and the late Nirvana lead singer share the same first name). "It just so happens that Ewan [McGregor, who plays Wild] resembles Kurt Cobain more than he does Iggy Pop in the face."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1993
How good is life at the top of the charts?Not very. In fact, it's pretty lousy -- or so Kurt Cobain makes it seem on the new Nirvana album, "In Utero" (Geffen 24607, arriving in record stores today)."Teen-age angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old," he snarls, opening the album with a none-too-subtle reference to the chart-topping "Smells Like Teen Spirit." But success, in Cobain's view, is pure poison, and he spends much of the album spitting venom at those responsible for his high-profile misery -- the media, the music biz and the morons who bought "Nevermind" without really grasping what Nirvana had to say.Just listen to the way he rants against "self-appointed judges" over the clattering guitars and clangorous drums of "Serve the Servants," a song that seems to detail Co- bain's resentment at having to honor interview requests and endure photo sessions -- to serve, in other words, the "servants" of the media.
NEWS
By Eric R. Danton | April 6, 2004
KURT COBAIN was eulogized as the spokesman of a generation when he killed himself 10 years ago. The Nirvana front man's songs were hailed as the embodiment of the angst said to gnaw at members of Generation X, and his influence on popular music has been pegged at somewhere between immense and immeasurable. "Kurt was one of the masters of the craft, in addition to being a voice of adolescents of all ages," Danny Goldberg, a former Nirvana manager who later founded Artemis Records, told Spin magazine for its Cobain tribute issue.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 1, 1996
Although rock and roll has seen more than its share of tragedies, few were as genuinely unsettling as Kurt Cobain's suicide in April 1994.It wasn't just that he had been so desperate to opt out of rock stardom; what really left people reeling was the way his death seemed to underscore the despair running through his songs. For many commentators, Cobain was a symbol for his generation's lack of hope and self-esteem, and over time, his death became almost more important than the music he made with Nirvana.
FEATURES
By Gene Stout and Gene Stout,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 5, 1995
There's no rest for grunge-rock martyrs, as Courtney Love has discovered. She can't find a suitable place to bury the ashes of her late husband, Kurt Cobain, lead singer of Nirvana.Of the two Seattle cemeteries she has approached, one has turned her down, citing security concerns, and the other wants at least $100,000 a year to cover the costs of full-time security to protect the cemetery and grave site. That's in addition to a $75,000 tombstone the cemetery wants her to buy."I don't have that kind of money, and Kurt didn't have that kind of money," said Ms. Love, who sings for the band Hole.
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