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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
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Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 2, 2013
Editor: I lift the lid off the writhing pot on my stove and inhale deeply. The aroma of Old Bay seasoning and the briny crab reaches my nose, a smell so familiar and so comforting. Their bright red bodies smeared wholly with that special seasoning wipes away the fact that a mere hour earlier the pots contents were in a cooler on the floor, scratching and pinching, and blue. Placing the lid carefully back down, I turn my attention to the sweet corn, its smell dispersing through the kitchen alarming those present it is ready to be eaten, the broth milky and corn silk floating along in a one note soup.
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By ROB KASPER | October 13, 1996
IN ITS PRIMAL state, popcorn looks like a small, hard ear of sweet corn, not a package on a grocery-store shelf. Most of the popcorn crop is harvested in the fall, so now you can find the occasional ear, au naturel, being sold at roadside stands or in community markets.The other day I bought three ears of popcorn from Pam Pahl at the stand she and her husband, Les, operate at the Farmers' Market on Sunday mornings in downtown Baltimore. I had plans to get my hands dirty. I thought I was going to hold one of those cobs over a big bowl and rub the cob back and forth in the palms of my hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
This August, Gertrude's is hosting Lobsterama. On Thursday evenings in August, John Shields' restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art will serve a $23.95 New England meal and a $28.95 Maryland meal. The New England meal is a 1 1/4-lb. lobster, simply steamed and served with baked potato, cole slaw and Maryland corn on the cob. The "gussied up a bit" Maryland Meal is a lobster stuffed with crab imperial, the rest the same.  Reservations for Gertrude's Lobsterama are recommended and supplies are limited.
NEWS
Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 2, 2013
Editor: I lift the lid off the writhing pot on my stove and inhale deeply. The aroma of Old Bay seasoning and the briny crab reaches my nose, a smell so familiar and so comforting. Their bright red bodies smeared wholly with that special seasoning wipes away the fact that a mere hour earlier the pots contents were in a cooler on the floor, scratching and pinching, and blue. Placing the lid carefully back down, I turn my attention to the sweet corn, its smell dispersing through the kitchen alarming those present it is ready to be eaten, the broth milky and corn silk floating along in a one note soup.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | July 14, 2007
Over the last couple of weeks, a local delicacy has arrived at farmers' markets and roadside stands: the sweet, white corn that - paired with crabs, burgers, barbecued chicken or grilled fish - offers one of the most exquisite treats of a Chesapeake Bay summer. Forget the old staple, Silver Queen. Nobody in Maryland seems to grow that anymore. The new stuff is much sweeter, so packed with sugar it doesn't even need salt and melted butter. A couple of ears of a variety grown south of Annapolis called "White Out" could quickly become a habit.
FEATURES
By TERESSA GUBBINS and TERESSA GUBBINS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 16, 1997
Corn on the cob rates as one of life's perfect creations. Golden and beautiful, it's a model of nature's symmetry.Corn fanatic and cookbook author Betty Fussell calls it downright sexy."
FEATURES
By Sara Perry and Sara Perry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 30, 1999
Hands down, the Fourth of July is the biggest and best summer holiday. It's a day of family reunions and early traditions that become more delicious and meaningful with each generation. It's starting your own tradition with your favorite sizzling barbecue, corn on the cob and America's best strawberry shortcake. It's hanging Uncle Mark's 1956 souvenir flag from a pole, a porch or a window. It's the day to create your own extended family with friends and neighbors or a homesick colleague.Anticipating the day makes it even more fun, especially with crafts and projects that everyone can make.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
Grilled Corn, Mexican Style 4 ears corn 1 C sour cream 1 C grated cheese (parmesean, asiago, or romano) Chili powder Sea Salt Black Pepper Keeping the husks on helps the corn retain its moisture during cooking. Carefully peel back the husks, leaving them intact. Remove the corn silk and rinse the corn free of debris. Dry. Slather the corn with butter, and fold the husks back up to cover the corn. Place on grill, turning occasionally. Cook for about 20-30 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
This August, Gertrude's is hosting Lobsterama. On Thursday evenings in August, John Shields' restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art will serve a $23.95 New England meal and a $28.95 Maryland meal. The New England meal is a 1 1/4-lb. lobster, simply steamed and served with baked potato, cole slaw and Maryland corn on the cob. The "gussied up a bit" Maryland Meal is a lobster stuffed with crab imperial, the rest the same.  Reservations for Gertrude's Lobsterama are recommended and supplies are limited.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | July 14, 2007
Over the last couple of weeks, a local delicacy has arrived at farmers' markets and roadside stands: the sweet, white corn that - paired with crabs, burgers, barbecued chicken or grilled fish - offers one of the most exquisite treats of a Chesapeake Bay summer. Forget the old staple, Silver Queen. Nobody in Maryland seems to grow that anymore. The new stuff is much sweeter, so packed with sugar it doesn't even need salt and melted butter. A couple of ears of a variety grown south of Annapolis called "White Out" could quickly become a habit.
FEATURES
By Sara Perry and Sara Perry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 30, 1999
Hands down, the Fourth of July is the biggest and best summer holiday. It's a day of family reunions and early traditions that become more delicious and meaningful with each generation. It's starting your own tradition with your favorite sizzling barbecue, corn on the cob and America's best strawberry shortcake. It's hanging Uncle Mark's 1956 souvenir flag from a pole, a porch or a window. It's the day to create your own extended family with friends and neighbors or a homesick colleague.Anticipating the day makes it even more fun, especially with crafts and projects that everyone can make.
FEATURES
By TERESSA GUBBINS and TERESSA GUBBINS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 16, 1997
Corn on the cob rates as one of life's perfect creations. Golden and beautiful, it's a model of nature's symmetry.Corn fanatic and cookbook author Betty Fussell calls it downright sexy."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 13, 1996
IN ITS PRIMAL state, popcorn looks like a small, hard ear of sweet corn, not a package on a grocery-store shelf. Most of the popcorn crop is harvested in the fall, so now you can find the occasional ear, au naturel, being sold at roadside stands or in community markets.The other day I bought three ears of popcorn from Pam Pahl at the stand she and her husband, Les, operate at the Farmers' Market on Sunday mornings in downtown Baltimore. I had plans to get my hands dirty. I thought I was going to hold one of those cobs over a big bowl and rub the cob back and forth in the palms of my hands.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 14, 1992
Give Dad an ignitable corn cob for Father's Day.Why, you ask, would Dad want one? Because it would make him feel like a '90s kind of guy. A guy who is concerned about the environment. A guy who wants to build a good fire for the barbecue.I know. I'm a dad and I worry about these things.I read about coated cobs and wanted some, so I quickly called the outfit that makes, or at least repackages, the corn cobs, Griffo Grill in Quincy, Ill. These cobs of Illinois -- feed corn dipped in food-grade paraffin -- are called Cob Lites and are being sold in food stores as fire starters for charcoal briquettes.
FEATURES
By Copley News Service | July 14, 1991
Corn on the cob is available almost the year round, but there's no doubt that it's best during the season that practically is synonymous with fresh corn -- summer.Not all corn is table-ready. Basically, there are several classifications, including popcorn, field corn, ornamental corn and sweet corn. Popcorn kernels burst open when exposed to heat. Field corn is used for animal feed or dried for hominy. It also is ground to make masa harina, which is used for corn tortillas and tamales. Ornamental is the multicolored dried corn that is used in decorations.
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