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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2005
A cigarette promotion that urged college-age consumers to concoct exotic drinks and "Go `Til Daybreak" ended yesterday after R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. bowed to complaints that it could encourage irresponsible drinking. Since January, the nation's second-largest tobacco company has been mailing a Camel cigarettes promotion to people as young as 21 containing six drink coasters. The coasters contain cocktail recipes and boozy exhortations such as "Kiss your worries goodbye." The campaign drew complaints Tuesday from state attorneys general - including Joseph J. Curran Jr. of Maryland - and from liquor distillers who said it encouraged irresponsible drinking and could target minors.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 7, 2014
Few players can torment a fan base like quarterback Joe Flacco. Sunday afternoons in Baltimore during the NFL season have become an elevator ride of emotions with No. 5. We cheer him. We boo him. We love him. We hate him. Sometimes he has the arm strength of Vinny Testaverde and other times he has the brain of Kyle Boller. The suggestion here is for Ravens fans to sit back, fasten their seat belts and get the cat out of the room so you don't kick it. And, just enjoy the ride because no one knows where it's going to end. Despite playing a poor first half Sunday in the season opening loss to the Cincinnati Bengals, Flacco almost rallied the Ravens from a 15-point first half deficit by throwing for 271 yards in the second half including an 80-yard touchdown pass to receiver Steve Smith with 5 minutes and 46 seconds left in the game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Morris and Mike Morris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2003
It's that time of the year again. With Memorial Day weekend behind us, several major amusement parks have expanded their hours and are offering new rides to entice the thrill-seeker in us all. Below is a listing of regional theme parks and what they have to offer. Expect to pay about a $40 entrance fee, although most parks offer discounted admission if you come later in the day. Six Flags America (Largo; www.sixflags.com/parks/america; 301-249-1500): This modern amusement park has more than 100 rides, shows and attractions.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2014
Firefighters rescued 24 riders who were stranded for hours Sunday atop a roller coaster at Six Flags America in Largo, officials said. "All riders safely on the ground," the Prince George's County Fire Department tweeted shortly after 7 p.m. Earlier, Fire Chief Marc Bashoor reported: "Operation going as smooth as can be expected. Patrons being evaluated. " The Joker's Jinx stalled at about 3 p.m., park officials tweeted, stranding the riders on a high curve. "All riders are safe, upright and being helped off the ride with PGCo Fire support," officials reported.
FEATURES
By Steven Bergsman and Steven Bergsman,Cox News Service | January 4, 1991
WHILE THE Milli Vanilli controversy grabbed headlines recently, another kind of pop music phoniness remains unchecked.In the 1950s, groups such as the Coasters or Drifters or Shangri-Las topped the charts. Today, baby boomers who grew up on this music can still see some of these performers in action.But the Drifters or the Coasters who now appear at county fairs, nightclubs or resorts may have few, if any, of the original players. These are imitation groups put together by promoters to exploit the affection people still have for this nostalgic pop music.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
They're your gal pals. You read each other's minds. Make each other laugh. Always know just what to say. And yes, you all know each other better than men know you. Because, quite simply, you're girlfriends. And this holiday season, you must find that perfect gift for each of them. Something cute and silly -- or splashy and garish. Maybe something a little wicked. Whatever you choose, you know she'll like it. And we've made it a little easier for you with some suggestions for great girlfriend gifts.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
There are timeless intangibles from "Gone With the Wind" that no one can claim for his or her own: Rhett's lascivious glances, Scarlett's expressive eyebrow, Melanie's character and Ashley's lack thereof.But don't worry your pretty little head, because there are plenty of collectibles connected to the 1939 film (re-released in theaters last week) that you can add to your personal stash.You can find more than 1,500 of these items at "The Gone With the Wind Memorabilia Store" in Plant City, Fla. - 813-752-7700, www. gwtwmemories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lyrysa Smith and Lyrysa Smith,ALBANY TIMES UNION | May 14, 2001
Admit it. You've been wondering how your refrigerator works, or how helicopters fly or why chopping onions makes you cry. You aren't alone. Millions of people have been visiting HowStuffWorks.com to read explanations of everything from what makes roller coasters roll to what makes toasters toast. In a year when dot-coms are crashing and burning, the award-winning HowStuff Works.com attracts more than 2 million unique visitors per month, wins industry and consumer accolades, and was touted by former Vice President Al Gore as "representing the very best of the Web."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc | May 22, 1991
Technology, always the roller coaster of stock investments, is lately giving even its most veteran followers a bad case of motion sickness.After an up-and-down 1990, this year began with a dramatic run-up in high-tech stock prices, fueled by a fascination with the bells and whistles of the Persian Gulf war. Fifty percent gains were the norm for many technology stocks in the first quarter.It was all downhill from there. Amid the discouragement of weak earnings projections and worries about overseas prospects being hurt by impending European recession, these volatile stocks lost much of their earlier gains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 1997
A tree grows in Little Italy, or so it seems inside the main dining room at Della Notte. Surrounded by decorative street lamps and a glitter-washed mural of an Italian waterfront, the faux dogwood stands at the center of the room, shading a ring of tables under its canopy.Dining al fresco is what the designers had in mind, an effect that's helped along by street views through soaring windows. But with all the columns and cascading roses, we couldn't help thinking that we were at the Italian pavilion at Epcot Center.
TRAVEL
By Carly Heideger, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Maryland's largest theme park is about to take a new roller coaster for a spin. Six Flags America in Upper Marlboro on Saturday launches Ragin' Cajun, a ride that is billed as the first of its kind at the park. At just over 40 feet, the ride isn't the tallest but it offers riders a different kind of thrill. Its "uniquely designed train cars" spin 360 degrees, traveling in circles along 1,378 feet of track. “There's nothing quite like Ragin Cajun anywhere in the region. With its twists, turns, dips and spins, Ragin Cajun is going to be the best new ride of the summer," said Rick Howarth, park president.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning is largely the reason that free safety Michael Huff lost his starting job with the Ravens. Now, he's the reason that Huff will get a chance to play in the Super Bowl. It's been a rollercoaster season for Huff, the former first-round pick who signed a three-year, $6 million deal with the Ravens in late March to replace long-time star Ed Reed . However, Huff started just one game with the Ravens before he was demoted, a result of getting repeatedly torched by Manning and company in the Broncos' regular-season opening 49-27 victory over Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 31, 2013
As the end of 2013 approaches, seldom has a domestic issue so dominated the political center stage as Obamacare did this year. The president's health-care insurance law has ridden a policy roller-coaster and will still have a huge question mark hanging over it in 2014. From the very start of Mr. Obama's presidency, the Republicans in Congress took dead aim at what became the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Mr. Obama was able to get it enacted only with solid Democratic support in 2010, while his party was still in control of both the House and Senate.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Take 10 is a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. Having - and sharing - adventures is the main theme in the life of Jim Seay, the 53-year-old president and owner of Premier Rides, a Baltimore-based company that makes theme park rides. The items he treasures most reflect that, whether it's one of his many past Super Bowl tickets or the photo commemorating the time he spent floating in zero gravity with famed physicist Stephen Hawking.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Jenny Mohler lay on an examining bed holding her pregnant belly at Sinai Hospital in Northwest Baltimore. Sonogram pictures hung from a machine in the right corner of the room. She was nervous, unable to block a feeling of uneasiness as she waited for a specialist to come in and decipher the images. Just two days earlier, the Catonsville resident had received a call while sitting at her desk at a Catholic Charities health clinic in Baltimore, where she worked as a school counselor.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
In the aftermath of Johns Hopkins' 13-8 loss to No. 11 Syracuse on March 16, doom and gloom seemed to befall the program. Since the team's 15-8 rout of No. 13 Virginia this past Saturday, a sense of jubilation is following the Blue Jays as they prepare for Saturday's game against No. 4 North Carolina. Navigating the roller coaster of emotions from one end of the spectrum to the other might be a factor for Johns Hopkins (6-2), but coach Dave Pietramala said the players and coaches are not buying into the hype after the victory over the Cavaliers.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When his political life turned sour, Sen. John Glenn would park outside the Air and Space Museum.He'd slip among tourists clustered around his old Friendship 7 capsule. Daughter Lynn remembers him gazing at the silvery, bell-shaped capsule -- a tin can the size of Cadillac trunk -- in which he became the first American in orbit.Mr. Glenn told her, "I wanted to remember that once I'd been somebody part of something big and important."Anybody doubt John Glenn is again somebody part of something big?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Baltimore-based Premier Rides said it will design and build the world's tallest and fastest- looping roller coaster at a California theme park. Six Flags Magic Mountain picked the company to construct the coaster next year, Premier said. Called "Full Throttle," the ride will include a 160-foot-tall loop, a "special effects tunnel" and three separate launches from zero to 70 miles per hour. Premier's other projects include what will be the world's largest indoor coaster, to open next year in the Great Mall of China near Beijing.
TRAVEL
By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
It's spring break for many students, and area amusement parks are ready to take visitors for a ride — up, down, sideways and backwards. Marylanders can take a day or weekend trip to one of these six theme parks, all within a few hours' drive of Baltimore. More than 300 million guests visit U.S. theme parks each year, and the recent economic downturn hasn't had a big effect on attendance, according to David Mandt, a spokesman for the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions.
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