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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
The Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay is in line to receive $21 million to continue its ship repair mission in fiscal year 2014 under the Department of Homeland Security appropriations bill, Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Monday. The 113-acre yard on the Baltimore-Anne Arundel County line is the Coast Guard's only shipbuilding and repair facility and also provides all logistical support for Coast Guard vessels. "The Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay employs more than 600 military and civilian personnel," said Mikulski in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
The Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay is in line to receive $21 million to continue its ship repair mission in fiscal year 2014 under the Department of Homeland Security appropriations bill, Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Monday. The 113-acre yard on the Baltimore-Anne Arundel County line is the Coast Guard's only shipbuilding and repair facility and also provides all logistical support for Coast Guard vessels. "The Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay employs more than 600 military and civilian personnel," said Mikulski in a statement.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce today that it is adding the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay to its Superfund list of the nation's cleanup priorities. The listing, which has been expected since the EPA recommended adding the site to Superfund last September, will ensure the yard undergoes a thorough study to determine the scope of the contamination, which dates to World War II. The 113-year-old Curtis Bay yard is in northern Anne Arundel County, six miles southeast of downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After nearly a dozen years, $16 million and the removal of some 50,000 tons of contaminated dirt, the Coast Guard declared the Superfund site at the Coast Guard Yard south of Baltimore cleaned and ready for duty Thursday. The yard landed on the Superfund list — a national registry of sites designated for federally supervised cleanup — after a century of building and repairing ships. Blasting paint off ships, storing oil and batteries, burning waste and dumping bilge left the ground polluted with dioxin, pesticides, metals, PCBs and other contaminants — some of which spilled into nearby Arundel Cove and Curtis Creek.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 7, 1995
Officials of the U.S. Coast Guard Yard will have a ceremony at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at the yard's Columbus Recreation Center in Curtis Bay to celebrate its recent ISO 9001 certification.International Organization for Standards 9001 is an international certification indicating quality procedures, standards and quality assurance checks in manufacturing and service sectors.The commandant of the Coast Guard and the deputy director of the National Performance Review will attend. Information: 636-7238.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
The Coast Guard Yard is a Superfund site, but that hasn't stopped residents around Curtis Bay from declaring the Pasadena shipyard a good neighbor. In the two years since the 104-year-old yard landed on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of the nation's most hazardous sites, environmental engineers have been inviting the neighbors over to show them old burn pits, salvage lots and dry dock sediment. Now, community activists are hoping the Coast Guard's example will encourage other companies around Curtis Bay to share information on pollution at their properties and to work with regulators on cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
The U.S. Coast Guard Yard, already an important center for overhauling ship engines, has opened a refurbished facility to increase its efficiency. The yard, located just over the Baltimore City border in a sliver of Anne Arundel County along Curtis Bay, has opened a 25,000-square-foot engine-overhaul facility to repair the main propulsion machinery of the 110-foot and 87-foot patrol fleets that operate from bases all over the country. During the past six months, construction crews renovated an old building that once was the 104-year-old yard's boat shop to accommodate the large engines.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
It has been decades since Charles S. Key Jr. has seen the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, but he still shudders when thinking of his first job there. Key was assigned in 1976 to work with the "major renovation" crew, gutting and rebuilding ships on and near the docks. He did everything from sweeping to moving salvage, he said. "The environment itself was just horrible, and really, really nasty," said Key, 52. "I'd come back to my room after work and my uniform would just be covered with rust and grease and who knows what else."
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Standing atop a flight of rusty stairs, high above the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, the Ancient Mariner watches the battered ships come in. He is older than most of the cutters. He's even outlived some. In nearly 40 years in the Coast Guard, he has steered ships through Arctic storms and war zones, white-knuckled nights and nail-biting days. At 61, Capt. William S. Cheever is an old sea dog. But the elements that wear down the ships seem to invigorate Cheever, the commanding officer of the Coast Guard Yard that straddles the border between Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
They've fought Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. over fly ash and anhydrous ammonia, driven away wealthy developers looking to build a racetrack and battled the Maryland Port Administration over a plan to create a dredge island - all in the past three years. Getting dumped on comes with the territory, say those living in Pasadena's peninsula communities. So, too, they say, does fighting back. But those who plan to attend the public hearing tonight on whether to place the U.S. Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of hazardous sites say they're not coming in with fists raised this time.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | November 14, 2007
In a deal that could benefit Baltimore's air quality and its bottom line, city officials said yesterday that they will soon capture methane gas from a landfill and sell it to the Coast Guard as a source of energy. The 16,000 tons of methane generated by the Quarantine Road Landfill annually will be pumped to the Coast Guard Yard, which will use the gas to light and heat its 112-acre facility on Hawkins Point Road in Curtis Bay - reducing its reliance on traditional energy sources. Several local governments across the country and in Maryland - including Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties - are looking at ways not only to reuse methane, which is a greenhouse gas, but also to turn what gas they collect into a revenue source.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
It has been decades since Charles S. Key Jr. has seen the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, but he still shudders when thinking of his first job there. Key was assigned in 1976 to work with the "major renovation" crew, gutting and rebuilding ships on and near the docks. He did everything from sweeping to moving salvage, he said. "The environment itself was just horrible, and really, really nasty," said Key, 52. "I'd come back to my room after work and my uniform would just be covered with rust and grease and who knows what else."
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
The Coast Guard plans to take no action to clean up the first of seven contaminated sites at its yard on Curtis Bay. A proposed new remediation plan - the first completed for the Superfund site - found that though cyanide, lead and other dangerous substances remain in the sediment under dry docks on the property, the level are too low to warrant concern. "It's an acceptable risk," Robert DeMarco, environmental engineer for the yard, said yesterday. "The numbers are decided by the [Environmental Protection Agency]
NEWS
By Deborah Dramby and Deborah Dramby,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2007
After 50 years of service and generations of family members in the business, Daniel Hahn's history is deeply rooted in the Baltimore Coast Guard Yard. His father worked there for 30 years as an auto mechanic and met his mother through a co-worker. In 1933, Hahn was born in their home, just outside the yard entrance. In 1957, he found his way inside. His father was a minister at Arundel Cove Methodist Church, where Hahn attended services with Rory Downey's grandfather. Downey is a quality assurance team manager at the yard.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
The Coast Guard Yard is a Superfund site, but that hasn't stopped residents around Curtis Bay from declaring the Pasadena shipyard a good neighbor. In the two years since the 104-year-old yard landed on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of the nation's most hazardous sites, environmental engineers have been inviting the neighbors over to show them old burn pits, salvage lots and dry dock sediment. Now, community activists are hoping the Coast Guard's example will encourage other companies around Curtis Bay to share information on pollution at their properties and to work with regulators on cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
The Curtis Bay U.S. Coast Guard Yard, already an important center for overhauling ship engines, has opened a refurbished facility to increase its efficiency. The yard, just over the Baltimore border in a sliver of Anne Arundel County, has opened a 25,000-square-foot engine-overhaul facility to repair the main propulsion machinery of the fleets of 110-foot and 87-foot patrol boats that operate from bases around the country. During the past six months, construction crews have renovated an old building, once the 104-year-old yard's boat shop, to accommodate the large engines.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
The U.S. Coast Guard Yard, already an important center for overhauling ship engines, has opened a refurbished facility to increase its efficiency. The yard, located just over the Baltimore City border in a sliver of Anne Arundel County along Curtis Bay, has opened a 25,000-square-foot engine-overhaul facility to repair the main propulsion machinery of the 110-foot and 87-foot patrol fleets that operate from bases all over the country. During the past six months, construction crews renovated an old building that once was the 104-year-old yard's boat shop to accommodate the large engines.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
Residents of a Pasadena neighborhood are speaking out against what was supposed to have been a routine permit renewal for a local company to continue disposing of manganese on its site along Curtis Creek. Erachem Comilog Inc., which refines raw manganese into products used in fertilizers, electronics, water filtration and pet food, has been disposing its treated wastewater into local waterways for more than 30 years. Every five years, the company renews its permit application with the Maryland Department of the Environment, usually attracting little attention from neighbors or activists.
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