Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCoalition Forces
IN THE NEWS

Coalition Forces

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Daniel R. Green | July 10, 2014
When I departed Fallujah, Iraq in October 2007 after a six-month deployment with the U.S. Navy as a tribal and political engagement officer, I left a city that appeared to have turned its back on Islamic radicalism and was focused on peacefully participating in the national life and politics of a post-Saddam Iraq. All across Al-Anbar province and throughout the Sunni Arab community, the tide of the al-Qaida insurgency had receded as Iraqis rejected the Islamist movement's harsh Sharia rule, raw brutality and false promise of a better future.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Daniel R. Green | July 10, 2014
When I departed Fallujah, Iraq in October 2007 after a six-month deployment with the U.S. Navy as a tribal and political engagement officer, I left a city that appeared to have turned its back on Islamic radicalism and was focused on peacefully participating in the national life and politics of a post-Saddam Iraq. All across Al-Anbar province and throughout the Sunni Arab community, the tide of the al-Qaida insurgency had receded as Iraqis rejected the Islamist movement's harsh Sharia rule, raw brutality and false promise of a better future.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2004
BAQUBA, Iraq - As children walked to the school next door, a suicide bomber detonated a car laden with explosives outside a police station here yesterday, killing at least two people and injuring dozens in the latest attack on symbols of authority in this country. The assault came on a day when U.S. forces announced the capture of former Baath party leader Khamis Sirhan al-Muhammad, detained near the city of Ramadi - like Baquba, located in the so-called Sunni triangle region, a stronghold of opposition to the U.S.-led occupation.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
Baltimore native Army Spc. Jameel T. Freeman was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan, military officials said Friday. He was 26. He is survived by his wife and two children, said his longtime friend and martial-arts instructor Del Ali Rawlings. Rawlings said that Freeman's family preferred not to speak publicly about his death. Freeman had a martial-arts black belt, Rawlings said, and the two had worked together as security officers for the University of Maryland. Rawlings' Black Tiger martial-arts studio in Windsor Mill is decorated with Freeman's photos and fighting trophies, he said.
NEWS
By Matthew A. Levitt | September 3, 2003
AFTER THE BOMBINGS of the U.N. headquarters and Jordanian Embassy in Baghdad, U.S. Army Gen. John Abizaid commented that terrorism was becoming the "No. 1 security threat in Iraq." In truth, terrorism was the greatest threat from the moment coalition forces set out to liberate Iraq. This was the plan in Damascus, Tehran and al-Qaida's Afghan caves from the beginning, but it will fail. Contingency planning by U.S. military strategists prepared to deal with a laundry list of potential catastrophes that never materialized, from saboteurs rupturing major dams to reprisal attacks by the long-suppressed Shiite majority against their Sunni-Baathist tormentors.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 26, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - The southern Iraq port city of Umm Qasr was under the control of U.S. and British troops yesterday, military officials said, opening a key route for humanitarian aid that could begin arriving in about two days. If that news sounds familiar, it might be because Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld made the same announcement Friday. That turned out to be overly optimistic. Coalition forces continued to face lightly armed but exceptionally persistent members of the ragtag fedayeen, the zealous Iraqi militia that for nearly a decade has been the brutal force behind Saddam Hussein's fist.
NEWS
By Harlan Ullman | April 10, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Will April 9, 2003, go down in history as a date that changed the world? Were the televised images instantly transmitted live around the world showing jubilant Iraqis tearing down a huge statue of Saddam Hussein and welcoming coalition forces in Baghdad signs of tectonic changes to come? Is this, as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld suggested, a "tipping" or turning point? Not simply in the war to depose Mr. Hussein, but also in fundamentally altering the politics of the globe, much as the tearing down of the Berlin Wall marked the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union in 1989?
NEWS
March 20, 2003
Following is the text of President Bush's address to the nation last night: My fellow citizens, at this hour American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger. On my orders, coalition forces have begun striking selected targets of military importance to undermine Saddam Hussein's ability to wage war. These are opening stages of what will be a broad and concerted campaign. More than 35 countries are giving crucial support, from the use of naval and air bases, to help with intelligence and logistics, to the deployment of combat units.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The remains of two U.S. soldiers apparently kidnapped last week were discovered yesterday north of Baghdad, ending an extensive search for the missing men. Military officials did not provide details on how or when the vanished soldiers died. They were identified as Sgt. 1st Class Gladimir Philippe, 37, of Roselle, N.J., and Pfc. Kevin Ott, 27, of Columbus, Ohio. Coalition forces involved in the search had hinted Friday that the pair might already be dead, saying would-be rescuers, acting on a tip, had arrived "too late" at a compound where the men appeared to have been held.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 30, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - British military officials dismissed yesterday suggestions that they lack adequate manpower to secure cities in southern Iraq, saying their primary obstacle instead was a decision made by the United States more than a decade ago. That decision, announced by the first President Bush on April 27, 1991, was to call an end to the Persian Gulf war, overriding military plans to capture or destroy hundreds of tanks trapped by American forces near...
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Tribune Newspapers | January 12, 2010
KABUL, Afghanistan - -Reflecting a quickening tempo of combat in Afghanistan as a U.S. troop buildup gets under way, six Western troops died Monday in or following clashes in the south and east. At least three of the dead were Americans. It was the worst daily toll in months for the Western coalition, which will increase this year by 30,000 American troops and an additional 7,000 from allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Four of the deaths came in separate incidents in Afghanistan's restive south, where most of the newly arriving troops are expected to be deployed.
NEWS
September 21, 2009
Senior Airman Ashton Goodman of Indianapolis was killed in May when a suicide car bomber detonated beside her convoy north of Kabul. The same attack also killed Lt. Col. Mark E. Stratton II of Houston and 1st Sgt. Blue C. Rowe of Summers, Ark. In June, Pfc. Matthew D. Ogden of Corpus Christi, Texas, was killed along with three other soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division by a roadside bomb in Wardak Province. In July, Lance Cpl. Charles S. Sharp of Adairsville, Ga., was fatally wounded by Taliban in Helmand Province.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,Los Angeles Times | April 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- An informal poll of Iraqis suggests that many think President Bush holds the upper hand in the struggle with the U.S. Congress over funding the Iraq war, and they doubt that Democrats can force a phased withdrawal of troops as a condition of passing a spending bill. "Bush is a fox who knows how to play the game and turn it to his own advantage," said Razaq Hobi Karreem, a 40-year-old laborer in Baghdad, confident that Bush will get his way on the budget. Karreem was one of 20 Iraqis in several cities interviewed yesterday on the spending battle and the outcome's effect on their future.
NEWS
By Hasdai Westbrook | October 25, 2006
As Election Day approaches, American soldiers are trailing in the polls. The Iraqi polls, that is. According to a recent survey by the University of Maryland's Program on International Policy Attitudes, more than 60 percent of Iraqis approve of attacks on U.S. forces and more than 70 percent want those forces out within a year. Most believe that the U.S. presence is provoking more conflict than it is preventing. The Bush administration's stated policy is to "stay the course" and secure Iraqi democracy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
KABUL, Afghanistan --A large springtime offensive by Taliban fighters has turned into the strongest show of force by the insurgents since U.S. forces drove the Taliban from power in late 2001, and Afghan and foreign officials and local villagers blamed a lack of U.S.-led coalition forces on the ground for the resurgence. U.S. forces are handing over operations in southern Afghanistan to a NATO force of mainly Canadian, British and Dutch troops, and militants have taken advantage of the transition to swarm into rural areas.
NEWS
By ARTICLE BY ROBERT LITTLE and ARTICLE BY ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq-- --The young soldier would die, a fate ensured by the bullet that entered his right eye and shredded his brain. But unlike many other patients on the beds and gurneys of the U.S. Army's main combat hospital, this one would die quickly, without any heroic attempts to open his skull or take over his vital functions with machinery, without the chance to remain alive until his family or friends could gather. If the doctors thought he had a chance of survival, they might have treated him differently.
NEWS
April 7, 2003
The battlefield As an armored noose all but sealed off Baghdad, a U.S. C-130 cargo plane landed at Baghdad International Airport, the first coalition aircraft known to have arrived in the Iraqi capital and a sign of increasing coalition military control. In Albu Muhawish, soldiers with the Army's 101st Airborne Division were ordered out of a captured Iraqi military compound when tests showed evidence of sarin nerve gas in a weapons cache. But U.S. military officials couldn't confirm the report.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Evan Osnos and Alex Rodriguez and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 20, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A U.S. airstrike that killed at least 19 people in Fallujah yesterday targeted a safehouse used by insurgents working for Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the al-Qaida-linked militant blamed for a deadly wave of car bombings and other attacks in Iraq in recent months, the U.S. military said. It was possible that al-Zarqawi might have used the targeted building as a hideout, said a coalition military official who spoke on the condition of anonymity, though there was no indication he was there at the time of the attack.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The U.S.-led international military coalition in Iraq shrank further yesterday after Bulgaria and Ukraine completed troop withdrawals and Poland announced it was reducing its contingent by 40 percent and switching to a non-combat role. Responding to appeals from U.S. officials, the Polish government reversed an earlier plan to remove all troops by the end of this year. But Polish officials said the 900 remaining soldiers of its 1,500-troop force will focus almost exclusively on training Iraqis while they wind down their mission over the course of 2006.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.