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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1991
/TC MOSCOW -- In a landmark step toward dismantling central control of the Soviet economy, the Kremlin freed Russian coal mines yesterday from the ministerial bureaucracy, granting them unprecedented economic independence under Boris N. Yeltsin's Russian Federation.But despite that major concession, forced by striking miners, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev last night seemed to drop his brief cease-fire with the republics.He accused Mr. Yeltsin of "cheap politics," dismissed Armenia's charge that a bloody Soviet military operation has been launched against it and declared defiantly that the Soviet Union will survive as a "great power."
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By Gwendolyn Glenn | December 14, 2012
"Claudie Hukill," on stage at Venus Theatre on C Street through Dec. 23, is a play about a poor family, struggling to survive hard economic times and personal tragedies in a West Virginia mining town. Set in 1972, the play is filled with generational, environmental, social, moral and class conflicts, centered around the main character and the play's namesake, Claudie Hukill. Although Claudie, a coal miner and town hero, is never seen, his presence is felt throughout the play as the drama surrounding his disappearance unfolds and escalates to a powerful ending.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 7, 1991
MOSCOW -- In a landmark step toward dismantling central control of the Soviet economy, the Kremlin freed Russian coal mines yesterday from the ministerial bureaucracy, granting them unprecedented economic independence under Boris N. Yeltsin's Russian Federation.But despite that major concession, forced by striking miners, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev last night seemed to drop his brief cease-fire with the republics.He accused Mr. Yeltsin of "cheap politics," dismissed Armenia's charge that a bloody Soviet military operation has been launched against it and declared defiantly that the Soviet Union will survive as a "great power."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
FROSTBURG -The state fined Constellation Energy $1 million for contaminating wells in Gambrills by dumping millions of tons of ash from its power plants in old gravel mines there. But with the state's blessing, another energy company is dumping hundreds of thousands of tons of ash into active mine pits in Western Maryland. Eighteen-wheel trucks routinely deposit steaming loads of ash from the Warrior Run power plant at a hillside coal mine overlooking the hamlet of Carlos just south of here.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 2005
QITAIHE, China - The sign near the small coal mine where Liu Quanju's husband and son died makes clear in bold red characters that, at least in words, the government supports mine safety: "Managing methane is a great responsibility. Fulfill your duty at work and inspect conscientiously." Such signs urging safety in coal mines are as ubiquitous as the proclamations by political leaders on the subject. But in a state where propaganda often runs counter to reality, all the posters and proclamations serve merely to underscore just how unsafe China's coal mines are. Many mine operators and their government patrons are reaping financial windfalls from the nation's energy-hungry economic boom, by producing as much coal as possible as cheaply as possible - a credo that is not recorded on propaganda signs.
NEWS
February 6, 2006
Across the country, coal mines have been asked by federal officials to "Stand Down for Safety" today - to take time off to go over safety procedures. The unusual national focus on improving mine safety follows, of course, the deaths of 16 West Virginia miners just this year. And it mirrors a time-out for safety Thursday in that state. But a day of emphasis on safety cannot make up for years of lax mine safety regulation and enforcement by the Bush administration, as detailed in a report released last Tuesday by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Education and Workforce.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 2, 1991
MOSCOW -- Shunning an invitation to stand beside President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Red Square, Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin marked yesterday's traditional labor holiday with the striking Siberian coal miners who have reshaped Soviet politics by rediscovering workers' power.Before a crowd of miners in Novokuznetsk, Mr. Yeltsin signed an agreement to accept the transfer of Russian coal mines from the heavy-handed jurisdiction of the Soviet ministerial bureaucracy to new financial independence under the Russian Federation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
What does country music star Loretta Lynn's Grammy-nominated album have to do with the Baltimore Sun? The clue is its title, Van Lear Rose. The "rose" refers to Lynn's late mother, Clara Marie Butcher Webb. Van Lear was the place, along Miller Creek in Eastern Kentucky's Johnson County, where Lynn's father, Melvin "Ted" Webb, worked in the coal mines for many years. Here's where the Sun connection comes in. Van Lear, founded in 1909, was named for Van-Lear Black (1875-1930), a Sun publisher and chairman of the A.S. Abell Co., then the owner of the Sunpapers.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
A RIVER is dammed to form a reservoir, and downstream beaches and marshes shrivel as the dam blockades their supplies of silt.Wastes removed from industrial discharges to clean a waterway are buried, polluting underground water supplies.The history of our modern environmental crisis is rife with unintended consequences of projects and replete with examples simply moving pollution around instead of eliminating it.So it is welcome to see even a small first step that runs counter to both these trends, such as the collaboration between Maryland's Department of Natural Resources and Western Maryland coal companies on a ridge in Garrett County.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1991
MOSCOW -- Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin hailed strikin coal miners last night for stopping the Soviet leadership's slide to the right and warned Mikhail S. Gorbachev that the recent political peace treaty between himself and the Soviet president is Mr. Gorbachev's "last chance."In a televised interview following his trip last week to the militant Kuzbass coal basin in Western Siberia, Mr. Yeltsin sought to cement his political alliance with the burgeoning workers' movement and fend off allegations that he had conceded too much to Mr. Gorbachev.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
NEWS
By Ashley Powers and Janet Wilson and Ashley Powers and Janet Wilson,Los Angeles Times | August 7, 2007
HUNTINGTON, Utah -- Rescuers drilled and smashed through solid rock yesterday in an attempt to reach six coal miners trapped deep underground by a massive pre-dawn cave-in. Searchers said they were within 1,700 feet of the miners but were still uncertain whether the men were alive. Workers have not been able to contact the miners since the collapse, which was reported about an hour after seismology scales registered an earthquake in the region. Company officials and hundreds of fellow workers at the Crandall Canyon mine - 140 miles south of Salt Lake City - focused their efforts throughout the day on trying to reach the six men, believed to be about 1,500 feet below the surface and 3.4 miles from the mine's entrance.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Tom Pelton and Timothy Wheeler and Tom Pelton,Sun reporters | April 19, 2007
BARTON -- The search for two miners buried in the collapse of a wall of rock into an open coal pit was slowed yesterday by fears that the cliff could crumble again. Rescue workers removed more than half of the huge pile of dirt and rock that fell Tuesday morning, trapping two miners who had been working at the Tri-Star coal mine, which straddles the Garrett-Allegany County line. The miners, whose names were not released, were operating heavy equipment, a bulldozer and a large backhoe, said Bob Cornett, acting district manager for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
MIDLOTHIAN -- In the woods at the fringe of this Western Maryland town, a mountain of waste 50 feet high is slouching into a creek that's tinted an eerie orange. The "gob pile" is refuse from a long-abandoned coal mine. And the stream into which it's eroding, Winebrenner Run, is devoid of life - one of the state's worst cases of sulfuric acid pollution from mines. At least 40 of these potentially toxic heaps rise in the forested mountains of Allegany and Garrett counties like tombstones for the state's declining coal industry.
NEWS
February 6, 2006
Across the country, coal mines have been asked by federal officials to "Stand Down for Safety" today - to take time off to go over safety procedures. The unusual national focus on improving mine safety follows, of course, the deaths of 16 West Virginia miners just this year. And it mirrors a time-out for safety Thursday in that state. But a day of emphasis on safety cannot make up for years of lax mine safety regulation and enforcement by the Bush administration, as detailed in a report released last Tuesday by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Education and Workforce.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 2005
QITAIHE, China - The sign near the small coal mine where Liu Quanju's husband and son died makes clear in bold red characters that, at least in words, the government supports mine safety: "Managing methane is a great responsibility. Fulfill your duty at work and inspect conscientiously." Such signs urging safety in coal mines are as ubiquitous as the proclamations by political leaders on the subject. But in a state where propaganda often runs counter to reality, all the posters and proclamations serve merely to underscore just how unsafe China's coal mines are. Many mine operators and their government patrons are reaping financial windfalls from the nation's energy-hungry economic boom, by producing as much coal as possible as cheaply as possible - a credo that is not recorded on propaganda signs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1991
MOSCOW -- It is Anatoly V. Malykhin's ninth day on a diet of mineral water and cigarettes. His square-jawed face looks like the kind they used to put on propaganda posters about the heroic working class of the world's first socialist country.Normally, he works as a tunneler deep in the Yesaul Coal Mine in Novokuznetsk, 2,000 miles and four time zones to the east.Now, he sits nervously in a two-room suite seven floors up in the Hotel Rossiya, next to the Kremlin. He is a key leader of the strike that has closed one-fourth of the Soviet Union's coal mines and brought dozens of coal-dependent factories to the brink of shutdown.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | October 25, 1991
Washington--The first great scandal of the new political season is upon us, and the guilty candidate may never recover.I refer not to a congressional investigator's report that Republican Dick Thornburgh, now running for the Senate in Pennsylvania, refused for years as attorney general to follow up leads about the BCCI mess.That multinational banking outrage is trivial beside what Democrat Jerry Brown did within minutes of starting his third try for president. He has committed the sin that drove another Democrat out of contention in 1988 -- a sin so dreadful it is denounced from the pulpits of the land: plagiarism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
What does country music star Loretta Lynn's Grammy-nominated album have to do with the Baltimore Sun? The clue is its title, Van Lear Rose. The "rose" refers to Lynn's late mother, Clara Marie Butcher Webb. Van Lear was the place, along Miller Creek in Eastern Kentucky's Johnson County, where Lynn's father, Melvin "Ted" Webb, worked in the coal mines for many years. Here's where the Sun connection comes in. Van Lear, founded in 1909, was named for Van-Lear Black (1875-1930), a Sun publisher and chairman of the A.S. Abell Co., then the owner of the Sunpapers.
NEWS
By Patrick Kerkstra and Patrick Kerkstra,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 29, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - While the Quecreek mining accident gave Pennsylvanias an edge-of-the-seat introduction to the problem of flooded old coal mines, few are aware of a far more serious menace beneath their feet: fire. There is Centralia, of course, the luckless Columbia County town that has been slowly incinerated over the last 40 years. But 48 other coal fires - the legacy of two centuries of primitive mining practices - are known to be burning under 1,200 acres across Pennsylvania, more than in any other state.
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