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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Coal Dust and Private Attack both punched their ticket to next Saturday's Hunt Cup during the 107th Grand National Steeplechase at Butler. In a stirring stretch duel, Coal Dust beat the defending champion by a neck Saturday as an overflow crowd watched under ideal jumping conditions. It's ironic that, barring injury or illness, Private Attack will make Maryland's most prestigious and lucrative timber race next weekend after finishing a game second. Last year, he dominated the Grand National, but then experienced a metabolic issue before the Hunt Cup and never made the race.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Environmental groups and some Curtis Bay residents are pressing the state to tighten pollution safeguards at the CSX coal terminal, saying they're concerned about runoff from the busy facility and about black dust blown onto and into their homes. Coal exports from the CSX terminal have risen sharply in recent years, said Leah Kelly, an attorney with the Environmental Integrity Project, a Washington-based group. The Baltimore customs district exported 5.1 million tons of coal in the first three months of this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, trailing only Norfolk and New Orleans in volume of coal shipped overseas.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 19, 2008
When Coal Dust was a youngster of 3, flat trainer Jimmy Murphy recommended that he be shifted to jumping, an unusual suggestion for a horse of that age. He even thought the horse could someday win the Maryland Hunt Cup. "Jimmy rode jumpers, so he knows what they look like," said Thomas Voss, who accepted his friend's view and converted Coal Dust into a steeplechaser. "On the flat, the horse was just a big, old rambling thing, and Jimmy thought he could be a pretty good timber horse. He did me a favor."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
Eight horses started the 113th Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday. Two of them finished. One by one, the 22 menacing fences picked off mounts and jockeys, most of whom had ridden the race before. In the end, though, it was a couple of Hunt Cup rookies who fought it out as Michele Marieschi, with George Hundt Jr. aboard, defeated Rosbrian by 4 1/2 lengths on an unseasonably hot afternoon in Glyndon. The race was won in 10 minutes, 7 seconds, well off the record of 8:25 3/5 set by Young Dubliner in 2002.
NEWS
May 23, 2006
Another explosion deep underground, another American mountain community enveloped in grief, another tragedy that only begins to make any sense if it adds impetus for much tougher inspections and enforcement of worker safety conditions at this nation's coal mines. This time - only a little more than five months after 12 West Virginia miners survived an explosion but then exhausted their emergency oxygen while waiting to be rescued - three of the five dead southeastern Kentucky miners appear to have suffocated in similar fashion after an underground blast Saturday.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
A decade ago, Irv Naylor fell off his mount during a timber race and broke his neck. He has not walked since. Naylor could have quit the sport. Instead, the one-time jockey became an owner, twice winning the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. Saturday, Naylor will watch the 113th running of the race in Glyndon and root hard for his horse, Askim. A victory would give Naylor the Challenge Cup, a 2-foot silver trophy awarded to an owner with three Hunt Cup victories. That has not been done since 1983.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2009
A year ago, Billy Santoro was the toast of the Maryland steeplechasing community. At age 58, he had guided Private Attack to a resounding victory in the 106th Grand National Steeplechase at Butler, and all signs pointed toward the Sportsmans Hall-owned horse giving it a go in the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup the following weekend. It didn't work out that way when Private Attack experienced a "tie-up" episode (the result of a metabolic problem) before the biggest timber event in the state.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
SHAFT -- The tree trunks along the roadside just south of this Allegany County hamlet are black with coal dust. A layer of black dusts the window frames, lawn furniture and porch railings. Even the grass in Julio Calemine's front yard is tinged with black. The dust, which can create problems for people with asthma, chronic bronchitis or other lung diseases, is drifting on the air from a nearby coal-processing tipple in apparent violation of the company's operating permits, he and his neighbors say. Worse, federal and state regulators haven't done much about it, they complain.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
Eight horses started the 113th Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday. Two of them finished. One by one, the 22 menacing fences picked off mounts and jockeys, most of whom had ridden the race before. In the end, though, it was a couple of Hunt Cup rookies who fought it out as Michele Marieschi, with George Hundt Jr. aboard, defeated Rosbrian by 4 1/2 lengths on an unseasonably hot afternoon in Glyndon. The race was won in 10 minutes, 7 seconds, well off the record of 8:25 3/5 set by Young Dubliner in 2002.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
A decade ago, Irv Naylor fell off his mount during a timber race and broke his neck. He has not walked since. Naylor could have quit the sport. Instead, the one-time jockey became an owner, twice winning the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. Saturday, Naylor will watch the 113th running of the race in Glyndon and root hard for his horse, Askim. A victory would give Naylor the Challenge Cup, a 2-foot silver trophy awarded to an owner with three Hunt Cup victories. That has not been done since 1983.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Coal Dust and Private Attack both punched their ticket to next Saturday's Hunt Cup during the 107th Grand National Steeplechase at Butler. In a stirring stretch duel, Coal Dust beat the defending champion by a neck Saturday as an overflow crowd watched under ideal jumping conditions. It's ironic that, barring injury or illness, Private Attack will make Maryland's most prestigious and lucrative timber race next weekend after finishing a game second. Last year, he dominated the Grand National, but then experienced a metabolic issue before the Hunt Cup and never made the race.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2009
A year ago, Billy Santoro was the toast of the Maryland steeplechasing community. At age 58, he had guided Private Attack to a resounding victory in the 106th Grand National Steeplechase at Butler, and all signs pointed toward the Sportsmans Hall-owned horse giving it a go in the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup the following weekend. It didn't work out that way when Private Attack experienced a "tie-up" episode (the result of a metabolic problem) before the biggest timber event in the state.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 19, 2008
When Coal Dust was a youngster of 3, flat trainer Jimmy Murphy recommended that he be shifted to jumping, an unusual suggestion for a horse of that age. He even thought the horse could someday win the Maryland Hunt Cup. "Jimmy rode jumpers, so he knows what they look like," said Thomas Voss, who accepted his friend's view and converted Coal Dust into a steeplechaser. "On the flat, the horse was just a big, old rambling thing, and Jimmy thought he could be a pretty good timber horse. He did me a favor."
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2007
The state's major spring steeplechase season concludes today with the 111th running of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon. And entering the $75,000 race, the story is as much about a jumper who isn't competing and one who hasn't competed well this spring, as it is about those who might contend at the four-mile, 22-obstacle course. Bubble Economy, last weekend's Grand National winner, will not run, so a newly offered $30,000 bonus to the winner of both races will go unclaimed.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2007
The state's major spring steeplechase season concludes today with the 111th running of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon. And entering the $75,000 race, the story is as much about a jumper who isn't competing and one who hasn't competed well this spring, as it is about those who might contend at the four-mile, 22-obstacle course. Bubble Economy, last weekend's Grand National winner, will not run, so a newly offered $30,000 bonus to the winner of both races will go unclaimed.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2000
MOSCOW -- Back-to-back explosions tore through a coal mine in Ukraine yesterday, killing at least 80 miners and injuring seven in the deadliest such accident since the troubled former Soviet republic gained independence in 1991. The blasts -- the first of volatile methane gas, the second of coal dust -- killed virtually all members of a shift of miners working more than 2,100 feet underground in the Barakov mine in the town of Krasnodon, near the border with Russia and about 450 miles southeast of Kiev, the Ukrainian capital.
NEWS
May 23, 2006
Another explosion deep underground, another American mountain community enveloped in grief, another tragedy that only begins to make any sense if it adds impetus for much tougher inspections and enforcement of worker safety conditions at this nation's coal mines. This time - only a little more than five months after 12 West Virginia miners survived an explosion but then exhausted their emergency oxygen while waiting to be rescued - three of the five dead southeastern Kentucky miners appear to have suffocated in similar fashion after an underground blast Saturday.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
SHAFT -- The tree trunks along the roadside just south of this Allegany County hamlet are black with coal dust. A layer of black dusts the window frames, lawn furniture and porch railings. Even the grass in Julio Calemine's front yard is tinged with black. The dust, which can create problems for people with asthma, chronic bronchitis or other lung diseases, is drifting on the air from a nearby coal-processing tipple in apparent violation of the company's operating permits, he and his neighbors say. Worse, federal and state regulators haven't done much about it, they complain.
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