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NEWS
August 26, 2011
Those in government who could make a difference have turned their backs on an industry that this nation cannot do without. The coal industry supplies the energy that keeps the lights on for half the nation, and it is an industry that does not need a government handout to survive. But while the Obama administration has promoted green energy nationwide, the EPA has been allowed to promulgate any kind of bone-headed regulation it wants so long as it goes against the coal mining industry.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment recently revealed a draft rule that would finally require coal-powered plants in the Baltimore-Washington region to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 48 percent over the next four years ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). Nitrogen oxides contribute heavily to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog) and seriously exacerbate cardiopulmonary health problems such as asthma. Smog is worse when air is still and hot, but 2014 has been relatively cool so there have been fewer "orange alerts" for dangerous air. But Maryland still has some of the worst air on the Eastern seaboard, due largely to coal.
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NEWS
March 22, 1995
The handwriting is on the wall for this state's small but tenacious coal mining industry in far Western Maryland. Tougher air pollution rules make its high-sulfur coal undesirable for industrial boilers and power plants. Electric utilities are delaying expansion plans for new generators amid a slowing growth in consumer demand.Within a decade, the coal business in Maryland's Appalachia will be extinct, local officials warn. That's 3.5 million tons a year of surface and deep-mine coal and 350 jobs in a region that badly needs employment.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
What hypocrites we be! We expound the virtues of shipping millions of tons of coal to stoke the fires of Asia — with a handsome profit to us while abetting Asia's environmental disaster ("Coal exports through port booming," June 12). Yet we revile coal as a means of addressing our energy needs here in the U.S. Seems like an international application of the familiar point of view, "not in my backyard. " Paul Butler, Street
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 5, 1995
Keyser, W.Va. -- The snow-flecked winter hills of Appalachia rise at Barbara Angle's doorstep and roll away in rounded ranks to a distant, fading infinity.This is the landscape of her memory. These are the comfortable hills of home.Ms. Angle grew up across the Potomac in Westernport, a Maryland river and railroad town that once sent thousands of tons of coal downriver on barges, a town long ago nicknamed "Hardscrabble." And she was injured for life in the soft coal heart of these hills.Now, in her new book, "Those That Matter," she has published a fine, bittersweet novel about a girl growing into a woman in a hardscrabble West Virginia coal town.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morganand Meredith Schlow and Jon Morganand Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1990
A story in yesterday's Money Today incorrectly reported tha two units of McCall Coal Co. Inc. filed for bankruptcy. McCall Coal, which owns 80 percent of Masteller Coal Co. and 100 percent of the defunct McCall Air Co., filed for Chapter 11 protection but those subsidiaries did not. The Evening Sun regrets the error.Jno. McCall Coal Co., one of the nation's biggest coal exporters and a top shipper through the Port of Baltimore, has filed for bankruptcy and is considering going out of business altogether.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1991
Bethlehem Steel Corp. announced yesterday that it intends to sell most of the coal operations in Pennsylvania and West Virginia of it's BethEnergy Mills Inc. subsidiary and some coal reserve properties.The steelmaker said that it intends to sell all coal reserve properties of its Primeacre Land Corp. subsidiary, which holds coal properties in West Virginia, and of its Pennacre Land Division, which hold properties in Pennsylvania.A Bethlehem spokesman, William Gigmac, said that the sale is part of the program of divesting assets not directly related to the company's core business of steelmaking.
NEWS
By John H. Gormley Jr | September 14, 1991
The main export coal terminal in the port of Baltimore is going through a boom and a bust simultaneously: Coal shipments are double last year's, but the terminal's machinery has broken down under the load, creating a backup of waiting coal ships and rail cars.In July and August, 38 ships loaded coal for export in Baltimore, more than double the number in the port during the same two months last year. But in August, the coal-dumping machine broke down at the coal terminal operated by Consolidation Coal Sales Co. The machinery was fixed a few days later but broke down again this week.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1995
GRANTSVILLE -- A group representing most of Western Maryland's coal companies is proposing that two power plants be built in Garrett County to generate electricity for other Marylanders.The plants would burn locally produced coal, possibly saving Maryland's traditional coal-mining industry. The plants' advocates portray the industry as jeopardized largely because of federal clean-air regulations.Together, the two plants would cost an estimated $650 million.In addition to creating electricity for more densely populated sections of the state, coal officials said the plants would create jobs and spur economic development, as well as assist an environmental cleanup along the Potomac River's north branch and the Casselman River.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
I read with interest your recent article about the House of Delegate's race in District 9 ( "Ex-transportation chief seeks political comeback," Aug. 22). The report highlighted the differences between candidates Tom Coale and Robert Flanagan. I appreciate Mr. Coale's positive, thoughtful and collaborative campaign. His background, knowledge and intense focus on local issues will represent Ellicott City residents and businesses well. ________________________________ Buffy Beaudoin-Schwartz - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Dan Ervin | August 26, 2014
Maryland is failing to deal squarely with the problem of carbon emissions from electricity production. Given growing public concern about climate change, a fundamental change in our energy policy should be to reduce the burning of fossil fuels and pursue the development of emission-free nuclear power. That will take time and resources, with far greater emphasis on developing a diverse mix of low-carbon energy sources. Revising Maryland's renewable electricity standard to include nuclear power would provide a good beginning, since it would recognize the importance of the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in meeting the Environmental Protection Agency's requirement to curb greenhouse gases from electricity generation by 36.5 percent by 2030.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Eight years ago, Robert L. Flanagan was one of the most powerful officials in state government, earning $151,262 for overseeing an agency with a $3.7 billion budget and more than 9,200 employees. These days, as a lawyer with a family law practice, the former state transportation secretary is knocking on doors and waving signs in the hope of becoming one among 141 members of the House of Delegates. Flanagan, 68, is the Republican nominee for a $45,207-a-year, part-time House seat in a Howard County subdistrict that centers on Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The August 2012 derailment of a coal train in the heart of historic Ellicott City likely began at a small break in the rail line several hundred feet from where two 19-year-old women were seated next to the tracks. The presence of the break, made public in investigative documents released by the National Transportation Safety Board on Monday, further supports a conclusion many community members have been grappling with for nearly two years - that Elizabeth Conway Nass and Rose Louese Mayr, both 19, were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Coal-fired power plants are the greatest source of greenhouse gas in America ( "Carbon rules can work," June 2). Neighboring West Virginia extracts 90 percent of its power from coal alone, and there are eight active coal units in Maryland that violate the EPA's requirements for the filtering of sulfur dioxide, smog-inducing nitrogen oxide and other toxic emissions. Maryland is in soot soup! Not surprisingly, there are 34 deaths per million asthma cases in Baltimore. Twenty-eight percent of city high school students claim diagnosis (national average was 20 percent in 2007)
NEWS
By Ned Tillman | June 12, 2014
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy earlier this month announced plans to lower the carbon emissions from our antiquated coal-fired power plants 30 percent by 2030. Much of the justification for this has been focused on the need to slow down global warming, sea level rise and other threats of climate change. But there are many other benefits to Marylanders from reducing our dependence on coal-fired power plants that we need to fully understand so that we can enthusiastically support these new measures and speed up their adoption.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
Clyde K. Adams, whose Gold Street coal yard supplied a dwindling number of area homes heated by coal, was found dead May 24 in his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 80. Mr. Adams, who relatives said died of an apparent heart attack, made deliveries until he died, using a 1990 Chevrolet pickup truck that helpers filled with 80-pound nylon sacks of coal for delivery. Since 1946, when he established Adams Coal Co. on Gold Street near Pennsylvania Avenue with a World War II surplus half-ton Army truck, Mr. Adams continued to deliver Reading anthracite, bituminous and fireplace coal to the fewer and fewer area homes relying on coal for heat.
NEWS
By Lowell Miller | July 10, 2007
"You can't get blood out of a stone," the saying goes. But if liquid fuels are the lifeblood of the transportation sector, then technology and economics have combined to disprove that old saw. You can get blood out of a stone - specifically, diesel and other transportation fuels out of coal, at a price competitive with oil-derived fuels. That's good news for the U.S. The chemical-industrial process for extracting ultra-clean diesel fuel, jet fuel and other products from coal has been around for decades, but only in recent years have advances in technology and the steep increase in the price of oil combined to make "coal-to-liquids" an attractive part of the solution to our pressing energy security and environmental concerns.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
The crash of a 477-foot tanker into a coal pier in Baltimore in 2012 — which cost millions of dollars in damages and injured a dockworker — was likely caused by the "high rate of speed" at which operators tried to maneuver the ship into Curtis Creek, the National Transportation Safety Board said in its final report on the incident, released Friday. The findings could have implications in pending litigation, though the majority of the damages — those claimed by CSX Transportation, the Jacksonville, Fla.-based railroad that owns the pier — have been settled out of court.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
NRG Energy Inc. said Friday that it notified the region's grid operator of plans to retire all coal-fired generation units at two of its Maryland power plants, facilities that are the subject of a water-pollution suit by state regulators. NRG filed deactivation notices that would allow it to shut down the Washington-area units in May 2017, a decision hailed by environmental activists. The company blamed the impact of cheap natural gas, which has made coal a less competitive source of fuel for electricity, and the need to put in more emissions-reducing equipment if Maryland moves forward with tougher coal-plant rules under discussion.
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