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By DAVID ZURAWIK | December 17, 2008
Baltimore's Molly Shattuck says she "despises" the title of the Fox reality series in which she is featured tonight - Secret Millionaire - but "loves" the show. Shattuck, wife of Constellation Energy CEO Mayo Shattuck, goes "undercover" for a week as a worker in a hair salon and a waitress in a restaurant in an eastern Pennsylvania mining town hit hard by the tough economic times. Read my interview with her about her experiences on Secret Millionaire at my Z on TV blog. (10 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45)
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | June 26, 2008
Here's some news guaranteed to make your blood boil if you are among the millions of hard-working Americans who feel like they are in an economic free fall: There is a new class of super rich in America that has grown by leaps and bounds in the past 20 years. And, by the way, its members are getting richer than ever today, even as your standard of living sinks. Untold Wealth: The Rise of the Super Rich, a CNBC documentary premiering at 10 tonight, reports this trend, with correspondent David Faber interviewing economists, historians, a psychiatrist and several of the super rich who try to explain the hows and whys of this societal shift.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2007
E*Trade Financial Shares rose 54 cents, or 11 percent, to $5.54 after Chief Executive Officer Mitchell Caplan said in an interview on CNBC that "we can categorically rule out bankruptcy," adding that there would be no layoffs.
BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Walter Hamilton,Los Angeles Times | May 31, 2007
NEW YORK -- Even when it's play money, people just can't help themselves. They cheat. It happened to McDonald's four years ago in its "Who Wants to Be A Millionaire" promotion, and to Taco Bell in its "Wheels, Reels and Meals" sweepstakes. Contestants cheated, swindled tens of thousands of dollars and gave companies angling for good publicity black eyes instead. Now it seems to be CNBC's turn. The financial-news cable channel said yesterday that it was investigating claims that people playing its online "CNBC.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun Reporter | October 8, 2006
Subversive on CNBC? That's the word Jim Cramer uses to describe his Mad Money stock-picking show that ranks as the network's most-watched business program among 18- to 34-year-old viewers. While Cramer may grab the most attention for biting the heads off little toy bulls made of foam as he dispenses financial advice, he says his show serves a deeper purpose. He says he's trying to help the average citizen living with a government that's "of, by and for the corporation" make a boatload of money from the stock market.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke is getting a crash course in what it means to be the head of the world's most powerful central bank. Financial markets were blindsided Monday after CNBC anchor Maria Bartiromo reported that Bernanke told her that investors were wrong in thinking he's done raising interest rates. Stocks surrendered gains, bonds fell and the dollar jumped in response to the remarks, which Bartiromo said were part of a conversation at the White House Correspondents Association dinner in Washington on Saturday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 2, 2006
NEW YORK -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said the Fed is not necessarily done raising interest rates, as investors and the media interpreted his congressional testimony last week, CNBC reported yesterday. Bernanke said economic data will determine the Fed's rate moves, CNBC anchor Maria Bartiromo said, referring to a discussion she had with Bernanke at the White House Correspondents' Association dinner in Washington Saturday. "I asked him whether the markets got it right after his congressional testimony and he said, flatly, no," Bartiromo said.
BUSINESS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
Lights pulsate as cameras sweep the CNBC set, lightning crackling on a flat-panel screen while booms of thunder punctuate a loud electronic guitar riff. Then a middle-aged man in rolled-up shirt-sleeves flings his chair across the room, gesticulating wildly as he shouts: "Are you reaaddyyy SKIDADDYYY?!?" This is not your father's finance show. It's Mad Money With Jim Cramer, the former hedge fund manager's high-octane hourlong take on the world of stocks. For CNBC, it's a far cry from sedate business fare like Louis Rukeyser's Wall $treet Week, which used to define the genre.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | August 23, 2005
JONATHAN MURRAY has never met a television camera he didn't like. Call him a self-promoter, a media hound, but his strategy for getting his mug on the screen and voice on the radio is paying off - big time. Earlier in the year the gregarious Legg Mason financial adviser and his identical twin brother, David, signed up with CNBC to do "Tuesdays with Murrays," where the brothers dole out financial guidance while tossing out good-twin/evil-twin barbs and banter. Three months ago, they signed a contract to do up to 20 shows for a new segment on NBC's Today show called "Today's Two Cents."
FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,NEWSDAY | June 29, 2005
Much like the sprawling online marketplace on which it reports, CNBC's The eBay Effect jumps all over the map. This makes it fascinating, surprising, even enlightening. But it's also inconsistent enough to drive you to distraction. The 90-minute report from correspondent David Faber plays like a series of stories collected into a larger whole, without clarity of vision or, more frustrating, analysis. The Internet trading site, which links sellers and buyers in what Faber describes as "a very large community of essentially anonymous traders," has frequently been criticized, for instance, for enabling fraud through the "old-fashioned con game" gone high tech.
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