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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
I have a million other things to write about, and about 500,000 of them have been rightfully ordered up by editors. Despite that, and a growing momentum this Friday night in Baltimore that nothing matters in the world except the Ravens playoff game Sunday, I am going to take a minute here to talk about a correction CNBC posted today in connection with a report that linked GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney to President Barack Obama's auto...
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 13, 2012
Watch Baltimore's Millennial Media CEO Paul Palmieri chat with CNBC's Jim Cramer, yesterday on the popular show "Mad Money. " Palmieri breaks down the mobile advertising for Cramer and his audience. A good primer on how the mechanics of mobile advertising works as a business. Palmieri says smartphone users are clicking through on ads at five times the rate of desktop online advertising. About the new iPhone 5: "We're pretty excited about today's news," Palmieri said. "More screen space allows us" to make bigger and more engaging mobile ads the company serves to devices, Palmieri said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By From Sun news services | January 22, 2009
Less than two months ago, a National Geographic Channel documentary took a look at the get-rich business of growing marijuana. Now CNBC is similarly reporting on how American agribusiness is going to pot. In Marijuana Inc.: Inside America's Pot Industry, anchor Trish Regan explores the inner workings of an industry that lights up the economy by an estimated tens of billions of dollars nationwide. Traveling to northern California's Emerald Triangle, Regan gathers personal stories of growers, many of them otherwise law-abiding citizens who include a journalist, a political activist and even a former member of law enforcement all cashing in on this profitable crop.
MOBILE
August 8, 2012
Viewing Tips This is it. The London 2012 games end today. Especially if you were planning a lazy Sunday anyway, here are some times definitely worth tuning in: NBC Sports Network will show four portions of the women's modern pentathlon, whose entrants include Parkton native and McDaniel College graduate Suzanne Stettinius. See fencing and swimming 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and riding and combined 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Live action today includes the men's basketball gold medal game, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m onWBAL-TV.
BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Walter Hamilton,Los Angeles Times | May 31, 2007
NEW YORK -- Even when it's play money, people just can't help themselves. They cheat. It happened to McDonald's four years ago in its "Who Wants to Be A Millionaire" promotion, and to Taco Bell in its "Wheels, Reels and Meals" sweepstakes. Contestants cheated, swindled tens of thousands of dollars and gave companies angling for good publicity black eyes instead. Now it seems to be CNBC's turn. The financial-news cable channel said yesterday that it was investigating claims that people playing its online "CNBC.
BUSINESS
By Pat Dorsey and Pat Dorsey,MORNINGSTAR.COM | March 31, 2002
I WONDER who the unsung television genius is who thought of covering the stock market like a sporting event. "The Dow's ahead by a nose! The Nasdaq's down for the count! Techs strike out again, while cyclicals score a homer!" This whole notion of the stock market as a spectator sport is as watchable as it is absurd because stock prices become news in and of themselves, regardless of what's actually going on with the company. It's almost as if share movements were the real thing worth watching, instead of corporate financial performance.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
Louis Rukeyser, who has been absent from his CNBC financial news show since last fall, is taking an indefinite leave because of health concerns, the cable network announced yesterday. Rukeyser, who was last on the air on Oct. 31, underwent surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for surgery to relieve pain in his back several months ago. In a statement released by CNBC yesterday, Rukeyser wrote that further tests revealed "a low-grade malignancy" that requires continued treatment. He did not return a call left at his home yesterday seeking additional comment.
FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,NEWSDAY | June 29, 2005
Much like the sprawling online marketplace on which it reports, CNBC's The eBay Effect jumps all over the map. This makes it fascinating, surprising, even enlightening. But it's also inconsistent enough to drive you to distraction. The 90-minute report from correspondent David Faber plays like a series of stories collected into a larger whole, without clarity of vision or, more frustrating, analysis. The Internet trading site, which links sellers and buyers in what Faber describes as "a very large community of essentially anonymous traders," has frequently been criticized, for instance, for enabling fraud through the "old-fashioned con game" gone high tech.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 10, 2002
Cut loose by Maryland Public Television, Louis Rukeyser will be appearing instead on cable financial news channel CNBC at 8:30 p.m. Fridays in a show that will compete directly with Wall Street Week - the PBS show he anchored for 32 years. In an unusual deal, commercials will be placed solely at the top and close of the new half-hour show on CNBC, just where the underwriting spots highlighting corporate sponsors appeared on the MPT program. That's meant to tailor the format for public television stations, which will be offered the opportunity to broadcast the show the weekend after it's aired twice on CNBC each Friday.
BUSINESS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
Lights pulsate as cameras sweep the CNBC set, lightning crackling on a flat-panel screen while booms of thunder punctuate a loud electronic guitar riff. Then a middle-aged man in rolled-up shirt-sleeves flings his chair across the room, gesticulating wildly as he shouts: "Are you reaaddyyy SKIDADDYYY?!?" This is not your father's finance show. It's Mad Money With Jim Cramer, the former hedge fund manager's high-octane hourlong take on the world of stocks. For CNBC, it's a far cry from sedate business fare like Louis Rukeyser's Wall $treet Week, which used to define the genre.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | August 6, 2012
Homes selling for less than $100,000 in the Baltimore region outnumber those going for more than $1 million by a whopping 14 to 1. But sales on the low end are shrinking as the high end grows. About 1,850 homes sold for under $100k in the first half of this year, down 20 percent from a year earlier. The 130 homes that sold for more than $1 million? Up 20 percent. That's according to figures from Metropolitan Regional Information Systems' RealEstate Business Intelligence arm, which tracks sales made through the multiple-listing service.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun Reporter | October 8, 2006
Subversive on CNBC? That's the word Jim Cramer uses to describe his Mad Money stock-picking show that ranks as the network's most-watched business program among 18- to 34-year-old viewers. While Cramer may grab the most attention for biting the heads off little toy bulls made of foam as he dispenses financial advice, he says his show serves a deeper purpose. He says he's trying to help the average citizen living with a government that's "of, by and for the corporation" make a boatload of money from the stock market.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
So, you say you want no part of the "hearts and flowers" Olympics coverage that NBC is going to air in prime time from Sydney? NBC's got the kind of Olympics you want, but you'll have to pay for it. Beginning with a men's soccer match between the United States and the Czech Republic today, 279 hours, nearly two-thirds of NBC's planned 441 1/2 Olympic telecast hours, will air on its two cable outlets, CNBC and MSNBC. And the cable coverage, of individual and team competitions, will more closely resemble what most American sports viewers are used to seeing, as opposed to the stylized and packaged show they'll get in the evening on the broadcast side.
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