Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClub Seats
IN THE NEWS

Club Seats

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | July 15, 1993
An official representing the Charlotte, N.C., bid to get an NFL expansion team said yesterday that the group has sold out its 8,314 club seats.Dan Lohwasser of Muhleman Marketing Inc., said Charlotte has met the requirements of the NFL by selling all its club seats and luxury suites (102). Lohwasser also said there has been an order of 41,632 for permanent seat licenses, which fans are required to purchase to buy tickets. Funds from the permanent seat licenses would fund the team's new stadium.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
The Ravens will increase their ticket prices for the first time in three years, raising the cost of all seats by an average of $6. A letter is being sent out today to season-ticket holders explaining the average increase of non-premium seating (which excludes suite and club seats) from $50.82 last year to $56.60 this season. Club-level seating will go up either $2.50 or $7.50 depending on location. The Ravens were 22nd in the league in average ticket price last year and are projected to be ranked in the middle of the NFL - probably 15th or 16th - with this year's 8.7 percent increase.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Drake Witham, Sandra McKee and Buster Olney contributed to this article | December 5, 1995
In terms of luxury seating at sporting events, the Baltimore-Washington area is about to become the most luxurious of all.With the Redskins stadium announced yesterday for Prince George's County, and the MCI Center already under construction in downtown Washington, Oriole Park and the planned Browns stadium in Baltimore, there soon will be a staggering 30,625 club seats and 573 sky boxes for rent.That will almost certainly be the nation's highest concentration of the pricey seats."It seems pretty obvious that there is going to be a lot of competition for club seat and suite holders," said Marc Ganis, the owner of SportsCorp, and Chicago-based sports consulting firm.
SPORTS
By JON MORGAN and JON MORGAN,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
In the first glimpse of Ravens ticket prices in the next century, the team has notified its club seat customers that their annual bills will be going up by as much as 50 percent by 2003.That means the most expensive club seats -- the best seats in the house, outside of a skybox -- will cost $337.50 a game by 2003.Ravens vice president of sales and marketing David Cope said the increases for club seats, a luxury category that comes with waiter service and other amenities, do not necessarily mean other fans will see their tickets go up as much.
NEWS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
Initially reluctant to join the NFL's premium-seat campaign, Baltimore yesterday became the first expansion finalist to lease all of its sky box suites.Not surprisingly, the mood among the city's expansion organizers ranged from triumphant to ecstatic."It's important to the extent it confirms what we've been telling the NFL," said Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority. "That is that the market is here, that we could sell out our premium seating."We were opposed to the campaign at first, but the NFL wanted to determine whether we were able to back up our commitment.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | July 31, 1993
A chart in Saturday's editions incorrectly listed the availability of some sky boxes for a proposed NFL expansion team in Baltimore. In addition to others indicated as sold out, those priced at $45,000 and $50,000 also have been leased.* The Sun regrets the error.Organizers of Baltimore's NFL bid are considering some new approaches as the two-month drive to sell premium seats enters its second half."The second phase is going to be tougher. The first 30 boxes and thousand club seats sailed out of here," said Matt DeVito, an organizer of the city's bid and chairman of the Rouse Co., a Columbia-based real estate developer.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
On a day when NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue visited Oriole Park at Camden Yards and the sale of club seats for a football stadium in Baltimore remained brisk, a shining example of baseball-football cooperation came to light.The Orioles have bought a private suite in the stadium that will be built if the city is awarded an NFL expansion franchise. The sky-box suite will accommodate 16 people and is "well-located," said Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, but he would not disclose the price.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
One day after Baltimore went to the airwaves with its NFL premium-seating campaign, the final push moves into Camden Yards.It's "NFL Weekend at the Orioles." Starting with last night's game against the Texas Rangers, the Orioles were promoting Baltimore's NFL expansion effort.Fans can sign up for club seats for a would-be expansion franchise today and tomorrow at two locations at Camden Yards.Organizers of the expansion bid leased 370 club seats Thursday night during a four-hour special on WBAL radio.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Your new upper-deck seats at the Ravens' stadium don't just seem close to the stratosphere. They really are.Although stadium designers boast that the park will have sightlines as good as any in football, a number of compromises had to be made to accommodate all the elements the team wanted. The result is an upper deck that is among the highest in sports and tilted at an angle some patrons may find a bit steep.The reason is chiefly luxury seating. The team wanted to have 108 skyboxes and 7,900 club seats.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
Starting today, you can let your fingers do the walking into the best seats at Baltimore's proposed football stadium.Organizers of the bid to bring an NFL expansion team to town have established a hot line for fans seeking applications and information about club seats and sky boxes: (410) 539-4NFL (or 4635).Leases for the pricey accommodations will be sold from Thursday to Sept. 3 as part of a market test in the cities seeking a team. Baltimore is competing with St. Louis, Charlotte, N.C., Memphis, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Your new upper-deck seats at the Ravens' stadium don't just seem close to the stratosphere. They really are.Although stadium designers boast that the park will have sightlines as good as any in football, a number of compromises had to be made to accommodate all the elements the team wanted. The result is an upper deck that is among the highest in sports and tilted at an angle some patrons may find a bit steep.The reason is chiefly luxury seating. The team wanted to have 108 skyboxes and 7,900 club seats.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1997
They don't know it, but tens of thousands of Ravens fans are having their game-day futures into the next century decided in a cluttered series of cubicles at the team's downtown offices.Workers there have begun the painstaking process of assigning seats at the new stadium to the people who ordered them over the past two years.There are computers and special software to help, but meshing the labyrinth of seating "zones" with orders, keeping groups of friends together, and accommodating physical disabilities and idiosyncratic preferences, is a job done largely by hand.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | December 5, 1997
The Ravens have sold out another section of their new stadium, leaving 9,300 seats remaining out of the 59,000 that will be sold on a season-ticket basis.The remaining tickets are all in the end zone, with 3,000 in the upper deck and 6,300 in the lower deck. The upper seats sell for $300 for the 10-game package and require the purchase of a $500 permanent seat license. The lower-deck seats cost $300 and carry a $750 seat license."We've been talking to the people with the Carolina Panthers, and it looks like we're paralleling where they were," said Ravens spokesman Kevin Byrne.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
RALJON -- The debut of the Washington Redskins' new stadium near Landover is still a month away, but comparisons with the Ravens' field under construction downtown have begun.Those involved in the Redskins' project consider it "state of the art" and pointedly note that it is being built with a minimum of public money and with a maximum of private-sector efficiency. To Baltimore partisans, the Redskins' stadium is a stripped-down rush job.The two stadiums, set to open a year apart, have little in common other than 100-yard fields.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1996
WASHINGTON -- To some, it was the most highly prized ticket in the nation's capital -- more coveted than a seat at a White House state dinner, more enviable than a ticket to an embassy gala.It was a seat at the home of the Washington Redskins, Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, a Washington football institution seemingly as permanent as the Capitol itself.Not anymore. Like so many other longtime city dwellers, the Redskins are moving to the suburbs. This Sunday, in the last Redskins game ever at RFK, this year's team won't have any playoff hopes at stake -- just another piece of its history and a share of this city's identity.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
When Don Shula was winning championships with the Miami Dolphins at the Orange Bowl two decades ago and his teen-age son, Dave, was charting plays on the sideline, selling season tickets was considered state-of-the-art marketing.The concepts of club seats and premium seat licenses (PSLs) hadn't even been invented.That's all changed now in this era when money is what drives the game.The Shulas have found out the impact of selling these new kind of tickets. It helped drive them both out of the game.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | July 7, 1993
Herbert J. Belgrad, coordinator of Baltimore's efforts to attract an NFL expansion franchise, yesterday termed the sale of club seats and sky boxes an "overwhelming success."The two-month sales campaign began July 1, with fans putting down deposits on the 100 luxury sky suites ($105,000 each) and 7,500 club seats ($1,700 each).Belgrad, though, declined to give specific numbers."I don't want to get into a numbers game in the press, but I could not be more pleased," Belgrad said. "Both the luxury suites and the club seats were practically sold out the first day."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | July 7, 1993
Herbert J. Belgrad, coordinator of Baltimore's efforts to attract an NFL expansion franchise, yesterday termed the sale of club seats and sky boxes an "overwhelming success."The two-month sales campaign began July 1, with fans putting down deposits on the 100 luxury sky suites ($105,000 each) and 7,500 club seats ($1,700each).Belgrad, though, declined to give specific numbers."I don't want to get into a numbers game in the press, but I could not be more pleased," Belgrad said. "Both the luxury suites and the club seats were practically sold out the first day."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
As Ravens ticket buyers approach their first deadline today, team officials say they are encouraged by early signs of interest.Today is the last day for ticket requests from the highest priority group of fans: the die-hards who plunked down cash for premium seats in 1993.In a two-month market test in 1993 designed by the NFL, 2,840 fans put down more than $8 million in deposits on 7,500 club seats, a special, mezzanine level of extra-wide seats with access to exclusive lounges and concessions.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Drake Witham, Sandra McKee and Buster Olney contributed to this article | December 5, 1995
In terms of luxury seating at sporting events, the Baltimore-Washington area is about to become the most luxurious of all.With the Redskins stadium announced yesterday for Prince George's County, and the MCI Center already under construction in downtown Washington, Oriole Park and the planned Browns stadium in Baltimore, there soon will be a staggering 30,625 club seats and 573 sky boxes for rent.That will almost certainly be the nation's highest concentration of the pricey seats."It seems pretty obvious that there is going to be a lot of competition for club seat and suite holders," said Marc Ganis, the owner of SportsCorp, and Chicago-based sports consulting firm.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.