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Club Sandwich

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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 10, 2007
The club sandwich is a staple of lunch. Made correctly, with three slices of toasted bread, real bird (chicken or turkey), crisp bacon and fresh lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise, it can be the high point of any day. Just how the sandwich got its name is murky. Some stories link it to the sandwiches served on double-decker railroad club cars that once rolled across the country. Others say it sprang from country-club kitchens. Still others contend the sandwich got its start at a gambling establishment, the Saratoga Club House in New York state.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
The celebrated crab cake sandwich at Baltimore's Faidley Seafood  gets some national TV love Wednesday night at 9 on the Travel Channel. Faidley's crab cake on white bread with lettuce and tomato is featured on "Adam Richman's Best Sandwich in America," with the host stopping in Baltimore on this week's hunt for the top sandwich in the Mid-Atlantic. Be there at the start of the show, because Faidley's is up first in the opening 10 minutes. The idea is that Richman takes a different region of the country each week for 10 weeks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 14, 1995
When I asked my husband what he thought of his decidedly un-gourmet-looking club sandwich, surrounded by potato chips with a dill pickle on top, he gave it quite an endorsement. "It's the best club sandwich I've ever eaten," he said.I had a bite. And then another. And then another. I had to admit the combination of gently smoked turkey with crisp bacon, watercress, chopped tomato and chutney mayonnaise was addictively good, even if it was sweeter than I expected.We were eating at Peerce's Gourmet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
A smallish Lutherville strip mall is the setting for Sabor , a casual fine-dining restaurant with a Puerto Rican influence brought by chef-owner Rudolfo Domacasse who's worked in several notable Baltimore-area kitchens. We loved dinners there but had never tried the lunch menu. We were pressed for time but were in the neighborhood and decided to risk a slow-food experience. 11:59 a.m. We arrive and within five minutes we had drinks and a pretty good idea what we'd order.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 13, 1999
The sandwich has been around some 200 years, and we haven't stopped loving it.From the simple peanut butter and jelly, to the sophisticated grilled prosciutto panini, you can bet that between two slices of bread there will always be plenty of combinations to satisfy just about anyone.Sandwiches are easy to eat, the perfect portable food. A staple of brown-bag lunches, they can be as conservative, or as cutting edge, as you like.Consider the club sandwich: To me, this perfect pairing of flavors and textures is always a safe haven on a foreign menu.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | September 7, 1991
MORTON'S 10 W. Eager St. Hours: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays to Wednesdays; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays; closed Sundays. Call 625-2040. Although this gourmet food and wine shop has provided the Mount Vernon neighborhood with an assortment of delicious carryout for six years, it seems particularly kind to those of us who consume lots of chicken and turkey.Morton's Jamaican chicken salad sandwich ($4.50) is prepared with red and green peppers, red onions, lime juice and soy sauce.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2005
Drive-through coffee places are scarce around here, a mark of cultural deprivation, I suppose. This year, we added one more when the Wannago Coffee & Cafe opened in the parking lot of the Shops at Kenilworth in Towson. On a recent visit, we were not there to order lattes from behind the wheel; we were there for the carryout, so we ventured inside Wannago. It sits in a neat eight-sided building with a copper-colored metal roof. Inside, the high-ceilinged space is decorated with avocado green accents, exposed black air ducts, halogen lamps that hang from the ceiling and racks of display cases holding coffee beans that can be bought in bulk (top price: $34.95 per pound for Jamaican Blue Mountain)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
Despite all of the new development in downtown Towson the last decade or so, the county seat does still have some pockets of actual character. Ridgely & Ferrens restaurant/market is one. It's just that I'm not exactly sure how to describe that character. With its hardwood floors and shelves of basic household items (think toilet paper and frozen pizzas), the market has a nice old-timey feel to it. But there are also white, dangly Christmas lights over the butcher's case and colorful banners depicting sandwiches and utensils over the deli area.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2005
Every so often, I get the feeling that we're not in Baltimore anymore. To see what I'm talking about, head to the ever-expanding Harborview development near Federal Hill. Expensive homes are rising out of the harbor next to long docks filled with expensive boats. Near the dock sits a lovely carryout and coffee shop, Barista Espresso Cafe. Done up in muted brown, green, red and blue, with groovy lights, moody music and lots of expensive coffee drinks, Barista could fit right in in San Francisco, Boston or, I suppose, the new Baltimore.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 11, 2008
Riptide by the Bay (1718 Thames St., 410-732-3474), a casual seafood restaurant, opened a few weeks ago without fanfare in Fells Point. The owners, Meredith Zack, her fiance, Roger Rippel Jr., and his father, Roger Rippel Sr., have completely rehabbed the vacant building where a sailors' bar used to be. The renovations include covered outdoor seating in the alley on the side for about 26 people and an attractive dining room and bar with a nautical theme....
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 11, 2008
Riptide by the Bay (1718 Thames St., 410-732-3474), a casual seafood restaurant, opened a few weeks ago without fanfare in Fells Point. The owners, Meredith Zack, her fiance, Roger Rippel Jr., and his father, Roger Rippel Sr., have completely rehabbed the vacant building where a sailors' bar used to be. The renovations include covered outdoor seating in the alley on the side for about 26 people and an attractive dining room and bar with a nautical theme....
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 10, 2007
The club sandwich is a staple of lunch. Made correctly, with three slices of toasted bread, real bird (chicken or turkey), crisp bacon and fresh lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise, it can be the high point of any day. Just how the sandwich got its name is murky. Some stories link it to the sandwiches served on double-decker railroad club cars that once rolled across the country. Others say it sprang from country-club kitchens. Still others contend the sandwich got its start at a gambling establishment, the Saratoga Club House in New York state.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2005
Drive-through coffee places are scarce around here, a mark of cultural deprivation, I suppose. This year, we added one more when the Wannago Coffee & Cafe opened in the parking lot of the Shops at Kenilworth in Towson. On a recent visit, we were not there to order lattes from behind the wheel; we were there for the carryout, so we ventured inside Wannago. It sits in a neat eight-sided building with a copper-colored metal roof. Inside, the high-ceilinged space is decorated with avocado green accents, exposed black air ducts, halogen lamps that hang from the ceiling and racks of display cases holding coffee beans that can be bought in bulk (top price: $34.95 per pound for Jamaican Blue Mountain)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2005
Every so often, I get the feeling that we're not in Baltimore anymore. To see what I'm talking about, head to the ever-expanding Harborview development near Federal Hill. Expensive homes are rising out of the harbor next to long docks filled with expensive boats. Near the dock sits a lovely carryout and coffee shop, Barista Espresso Cafe. Done up in muted brown, green, red and blue, with groovy lights, moody music and lots of expensive coffee drinks, Barista could fit right in in San Francisco, Boston or, I suppose, the new Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Every two months, they come from Baltimore-area neighborhoods, the Eastern Shore and Virginia to sustain two treasures - their youth and enduring friendship. On this steamy summer day, the rugged platoon shows up once more, some using canes, one with a hearing aid but everybody with an attitude that seems to shout, "Ain't life grand!" The surviving members of Kenwood High School's Class of 1941, bonded by hardships from the Great Depression and World War II, gather at Sanders' Corner Restaurant in the Loch Raven watershed.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
Despite all of the new development in downtown Towson the last decade or so, the county seat does still have some pockets of actual character. Ridgely & Ferrens restaurant/market is one. It's just that I'm not exactly sure how to describe that character. With its hardwood floors and shelves of basic household items (think toilet paper and frozen pizzas), the market has a nice old-timey feel to it. But there are also white, dangly Christmas lights over the butcher's case and colorful banners depicting sandwiches and utensils over the deli area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
The celebrated crab cake sandwich at Baltimore's Faidley Seafood  gets some national TV love Wednesday night at 9 on the Travel Channel. Faidley's crab cake on white bread with lettuce and tomato is featured on "Adam Richman's Best Sandwich in America," with the host stopping in Baltimore on this week's hunt for the top sandwich in the Mid-Atlantic. Be there at the start of the show, because Faidley's is up first in the opening 10 minutes. The idea is that Richman takes a different region of the country each week for 10 weeks.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Every two months, they come from Baltimore-area neighborhoods, the Eastern Shore and Virginia to sustain two treasures - their youth and enduring friendship. On this steamy summer day, the rugged platoon shows up once more, some using canes, one with a hearing aid but everybody with an attitude that seems to shout, "Ain't life grand!" The surviving members of Kenwood High School's Class of 1941, bonded by hardships from the Great Depression and World War II, gather at Sanders' Corner Restaurant in the Loch Raven watershed.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 13, 1999
The sandwich has been around some 200 years, and we haven't stopped loving it.From the simple peanut butter and jelly, to the sophisticated grilled prosciutto panini, you can bet that between two slices of bread there will always be plenty of combinations to satisfy just about anyone.Sandwiches are easy to eat, the perfect portable food. A staple of brown-bag lunches, they can be as conservative, or as cutting edge, as you like.Consider the club sandwich: To me, this perfect pairing of flavors and textures is always a safe haven on a foreign menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 14, 1995
When I asked my husband what he thought of his decidedly un-gourmet-looking club sandwich, surrounded by potato chips with a dill pickle on top, he gave it quite an endorsement. "It's the best club sandwich I've ever eaten," he said.I had a bite. And then another. And then another. I had to admit the combination of gently smoked turkey with crisp bacon, watercress, chopped tomato and chutney mayonnaise was addictively good, even if it was sweeter than I expected.We were eating at Peerce's Gourmet.
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