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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | July 12, 2008
At the outset, Edward H. Bouton recognized how much appeal a country club would have for prospective homeowners in the new Roland Park. A place for men to golf, for women to lunch, for debutantes to preen, for families to socialize, for children to play on the rolling hills and under the canopy of trees that distinguished the setting in North Baltimore. Mr. Bouton, the general manager of the development company, had the right instinct, and sales reflected that. Novelist Henry James once recalled the pleasure of dining on one of the club house's "deep southern verandas, with great trees close at hand, flinging their shade."
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EXPLORE
July 3, 2013
At the end of 2012, the Woman's Club of Catonsville disbanded after 80 years of service to the community. At that time, the club donated the facility at 10 St. Timothy's Lane to the Catonsville Community Foundation (CCF), in order to provide a gathering spot and services for residents. Throughout the years of the Woman's Club existence, the group made an immense impact on the community. Among such contributions were offering the first location for the Catonsville Senior Center, coordinating the location of the Catonsville Library and helping organize the first Catonsville Arts and Crafts Festival.
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EXPLORE
July 3, 2013
At the end of 2012, the Woman's Club of Catonsville disbanded after 80 years of service to the community. At that time, the club donated the facility at 10 St. Timothy's Lane to the Catonsville Community Foundation (CCF), in order to provide a gathering spot and services for residents. Throughout the years of the Woman's Club existence, the group made an immense impact on the community. Among such contributions were offering the first location for the Catonsville Senior Center, coordinating the location of the Catonsville Library and helping organize the first Catonsville Arts and Crafts Festival.
EXPLORE
May 1, 2012
The Laurel Rotary will offer music, art and wine tasting at its annual fundraising Spring Potpourri, Friday, May 4 at 7 p.m. at the club house at Patuxent Greens, 14415 Greenview Drive. Artists will have their works on display and for sale, and local musician Bobby Walters and Laurel pianist Mack Statham will both perform. Wine and cheese will be served. Admission is $25, which can be paid at the door. The Spring Potpourri is one way the Laurel Rotary raises funds for projects such as the Outstanding Student scholarships, awarded each quarter to a student from Laurel High and a student from St. Vincent Pallotti High.
EXPLORE
May 1, 2012
The Laurel Rotary will offer music, art and wine tasting at its annual fundraising Spring Potpourri, Friday, May 4 at 7 p.m. at the club house at Patuxent Greens, 14415 Greenview Drive. Artists will have their works on display and for sale, and local musician Bobby Walters and Laurel pianist Mack Statham will both perform. Wine and cheese will be served. Admission is $25, which can be paid at the door. The Spring Potpourri is one way the Laurel Rotary raises funds for projects such as the Outstanding Student scholarships, awarded each quarter to a student from Laurel High and a student from St. Vincent Pallotti High.
NEWS
September 16, 1992
The decline of Pennsylvania Avenue, the hub o segregation-era Baltimore's black businesses and night-time entertainment, continues. The latest casualty is the Sphinx Club, a unique institution which for 46 years functioned as a center for socializing and networking for the city's burgeoning black middle class.The Sphinx was born in 1946. Charles Tilghman, who had first owned the Golden Rod Cafe and then Club Manhattan at 2107 Pennsylvania Ave., decided Baltimore was ready for an exclusive black private club.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Members of the Arch Social Club, at North and Pennsylvania avenues, are about to have a party. And the reason they're partying is that the city's oldest African-American social club is about to celebrate its centenary. An anniversary church service in recognition of its 100th birthday gets under way at 11 a.m. Sunday at Fulton Baptist Church, at 1630 W. North Ave. At its conclusion, revelers can cross the street to the club, and beginning at 1:30 p.m. take in a dinner and a jazz show featuring the Arch Social Club Big Band under the direction of Phil Butts.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
The Social Security Administration, in the midst of a $100 million overhaul of its complex of buildings in Woodlawn, has found an unlikely place to house its displaced workers: a former Sam's Club. Workers began moving last week into the unused "big box" store, which is near the agency's campus abutting the Baltimore Beltway west of the city. The federal government leased the building for 10 years and will rotate up to 700 workers into the new offices at any time. "We'll use it as swing space as we do work on different buildings in Woodlawn," said Robert J. Shaw, a public information officer for the General Services Administration, which handles leasing.
NEWS
By Abby Foster and Abby Foster,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
Beazer Homes, a Baltimore-area developer, has proposed two plans to convert the Bonnie View Country Club in Pikesville into a residential community. But both have run into stiff opposition from neighbors who fear a sudden influx of new residents and severe traffic congestion. One plan envisions a development for "active adults" ages 55 and older. This proposal includes 546 dwellings - 226 condominiums, 178 townhouses, and 142 single-family homes. The second would create a community of 367 detached homes to be called Bonnie View Estates.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
January 1, 1921- March 9, 2006. Friends and family are invited to join us to celebrate her life on Friday, April 28, at the Elkridge Estates Club House, 6025 Roland Avenue from 4 to 7pm.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Members of the Arch Social Club, at North and Pennsylvania avenues, are about to have a party. And the reason they're partying is that the city's oldest African-American social club is about to celebrate its centenary. An anniversary church service in recognition of its 100th birthday gets under way at 11 a.m. Sunday at Fulton Baptist Church, at 1630 W. North Ave. At its conclusion, revelers can cross the street to the club, and beginning at 1:30 p.m. take in a dinner and a jazz show featuring the Arch Social Club Big Band under the direction of Phil Butts.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | July 12, 2008
At the outset, Edward H. Bouton recognized how much appeal a country club would have for prospective homeowners in the new Roland Park. A place for men to golf, for women to lunch, for debutantes to preen, for families to socialize, for children to play on the rolling hills and under the canopy of trees that distinguished the setting in North Baltimore. Mr. Bouton, the general manager of the development company, had the right instinct, and sales reflected that. Novelist Henry James once recalled the pleasure of dining on one of the club house's "deep southern verandas, with great trees close at hand, flinging their shade."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
The Social Security Administration, in the midst of a $100 million overhaul of its complex of buildings in Woodlawn, has found an unlikely place to house its displaced workers: a former Sam's Club. Workers began moving last week into the unused "big box" store, which is near the agency's campus abutting the Baltimore Beltway west of the city. The federal government leased the building for 10 years and will rotate up to 700 workers into the new offices at any time. "We'll use it as swing space as we do work on different buildings in Woodlawn," said Robert J. Shaw, a public information officer for the General Services Administration, which handles leasing.
NEWS
By Abby Foster and Abby Foster,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
Beazer Homes, a Baltimore-area developer, has proposed two plans to convert the Bonnie View Country Club in Pikesville into a residential community. But both have run into stiff opposition from neighbors who fear a sudden influx of new residents and severe traffic congestion. One plan envisions a development for "active adults" ages 55 and older. This proposal includes 546 dwellings - 226 condominiums, 178 townhouses, and 142 single-family homes. The second would create a community of 367 detached homes to be called Bonnie View Estates.
NEWS
September 16, 1992
The decline of Pennsylvania Avenue, the hub o segregation-era Baltimore's black businesses and night-time entertainment, continues. The latest casualty is the Sphinx Club, a unique institution which for 46 years functioned as a center for socializing and networking for the city's burgeoning black middle class.The Sphinx was born in 1946. Charles Tilghman, who had first owned the Golden Rod Cafe and then Club Manhattan at 2107 Pennsylvania Ave., decided Baltimore was ready for an exclusive black private club.
NEWS
January 12, 1995
POLICE LOG* Dorsey's Search: 5300 block of Columbia Road: Someone smashed the front window at an apartment community club house with a concrete block and took computer equipment Monday, police said.* Wilde Lake: 5200 block of Paul Revere Ride: Someone tried to enter a home by prying open its front door Friday, police said.
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