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NEWS
October 1, 2001
ECSTASY, chemically known as MDMA, is no longer just a "club drug," confined to frenetic dancers at all-night "rave" parties. It is the fastest-growing illegal drug in Maryland and in the United States. It may not be physically addictive, but it can permanently damage the brain, harm the kidney and liver, cause heart attacks, comas and seizures. And Ecstasy can kill. The latest drug-use survey of nearly 35,000 Maryland schoolchildren confirms the rising appeal of this stimulant-hallucinogen pill.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Inside a three-story Victorian home in Towson, police said they found Baltimore County's first functional MDMA lab, producing a drug more commonly known as the trendy club drug "Molly. " Neighbors said they were surprised when county police officers and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents rolled up to the house Wednesday morning and donned white hazmat suits before searching the home, just off York Road near the city line. Investigators found chemicals and glassware used to manufacture and sell MDMA, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
NEWS
By Justin George and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Howard County officials say they are investigating security and screening procedures at Merriweather Post Pavilion after two concertgoers died and 19 others were sent to hospitals during an electronic dance music festival over the weekend. The deaths of two young men, ages 20 and 17, who attended the daylong concert called the Mad Decent Block Party were the latest tragedy for the nationally renowned amphitheater in Columbia that has been drawing major musical artists for nearly 50 years.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1999
Blue Nitro, the new "club drug" of the suburban set, is sometimes billed as a safe, natural high.It's about as safe and natural as floor varnish and lye -- two of the ingredients kitchen chemists commonly use to make it, according to Maryland anti-drug officials who have counted 10 overdose cases in emergency rooms around the state since January. That's an increase over last year, when two overdoses were reported to the Maryland Poison Center.An overdose of the drug GHB, sometimes called Blue Nitro, starts off like a bad drunk and can end in seizures, comas, and pneumonia, according to a report to Maryland's newly formed Drug Early Warning System from the poison control center.
NEWS
By Justin George and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Howard County officials say they are investigating security and screening procedures at Merriweather Post Pavilion after two concertgoers died and 19 others were sent to hospitals during an electronic dance music festival over the weekend. The deaths of two young men, ages 20 and 17, who attended the daylong concert called the Mad Decent Block Party were the latest tragedy for the nationally renowned amphitheater in Columbia that has been drawing major musical artists for nearly 50 years.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | January 28, 2001
Often, Shawn Shroyer can't think straight. He stumbles over words, forgets what he's just said. Awkward pauses punctuate his speech. He feels burnt out, fried, silently suffering in some cursed perpetual morning after -- a far cry from the whip-smart, gregarious young man that he used to be. And he's all of 21. Shroyer blames Ecstasy, the trendy and increasingly popular illegal drug among teens in Maryland and elsewhere. Once confined mostly to dance clubs and "raves," large, all-night techno music- fueled underground parties, Ecstasy is a little pill that's big and getting bigger.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 15, 2000
A federal judge ordered home detention yesterday for a Baltimore police officer charged in a drug conspiracy case after prosecutors failed to substantiate allegations that he tried to obstruct justice after his arrest last week. U.S. Magistrate Judge Beth P. Gessner released John H. Wilson, 27, to the custody of a family friend. She ordered electronic home monitoring for him and that he undergo psychological, drug and alcohol treatment. Federal prosecutors said last week that Wilson, while jailed, had contacted co-conspirators about destroying evidence and threatening witnesses.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
A federal prosecutor described Baltimore police Officer John Harold Wilson yesterday as the central figure in an area Ecstasy ring that police say was much larger than initial court documents suggested. City police said 12 people have been arrested on state and federal charges in the investigation that has netted about $1.5 million worth of the feel-good club drug. Ecstasy has become an increasing concern for local and federal law enforcement. Police have recovered 45 weapons, 11 vehicles and about $425,000 in cash from the three-month investigation that focused on one of their own - an effort that Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris said proves the department is committed to rooting out corruption.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Inside a three-story Victorian home in Towson, police said they found Baltimore County's first functional MDMA lab, producing a drug more commonly known as the trendy club drug "Molly. " Neighbors said they were surprised when county police officers and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents rolled up to the house Wednesday morning and donned white hazmat suits before searching the home, just off York Road near the city line. Investigators found chemicals and glassware used to manufacture and sell MDMA, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
NEWS
October 1, 2001
ECSTASY, chemically known as MDMA, is no longer just a "club drug," confined to frenetic dancers at all-night "rave" parties. It is the fastest-growing illegal drug in Maryland and in the United States. It may not be physically addictive, but it can permanently damage the brain, harm the kidney and liver, cause heart attacks, comas and seizures. And Ecstasy can kill. The latest drug-use survey of nearly 35,000 Maryland schoolchildren confirms the rising appeal of this stimulant-hallucinogen pill.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | January 28, 2001
Often, Shawn Shroyer can't think straight. He stumbles over words, forgets what he's just said. Awkward pauses punctuate his speech. He feels burnt out, fried, silently suffering in some cursed perpetual morning after -- a far cry from the whip-smart, gregarious young man that he used to be. And he's all of 21. Shroyer blames Ecstasy, the trendy and increasingly popular illegal drug among teens in Maryland and elsewhere. Once confined mostly to dance clubs and "raves," large, all-night techno music- fueled underground parties, Ecstasy is a little pill that's big and getting bigger.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1999
Blue Nitro, the new "club drug" of the suburban set, is sometimes billed as a safe, natural high.It's about as safe and natural as floor varnish and lye -- two of the ingredients kitchen chemists commonly use to make it, according to Maryland anti-drug officials who have counted 10 overdose cases in emergency rooms around the state since January. That's an increase over last year, when two overdoses were reported to the Maryland Poison Center.An overdose of the drug GHB, sometimes called Blue Nitro, starts off like a bad drunk and can end in seizures, comas, and pneumonia, according to a report to Maryland's newly formed Drug Early Warning System from the poison control center.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Authorities have charged a Howard County social studies teacher with accepting $50,000 worth of methamphetamine from a middleman who was secretly working with state and federal drug enforcement agents. Timothy W. Hartlove was arrested and charged this week with two counts of drug possession with intent to distribute by Baltimore County police. Authorities later searched his home in the 2300 block of Eutaw Place in Baltimore and found methamphetamine, marijuana, 52 tablets of the club drug Ecstasy, a quart of the odorless "date-rape" drug known as GHB and about $16,500 in cash locked inside a safe, according to court papers.
NEWS
December 17, 2004
WITH JUST 14 days left in the year, it's highly unlikely that Baltimore's murder rate will hit 300. But it doesn't really matter. When police responded to a fatal shooting in the 1800 block of E. Chase St. on Wednesday evening, the city hit the total number of murders recorded for all of last year - 271. That's the relevant number because it marks yet another year in which the city homicide rate rose. The murder tally can only go up, and 2004 can only go down as a more deadly year than the last.
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