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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2003
Esther W. Martin, longtime owner of a well-known Charles Street bar that evolved from Tenderloin to trendy, died Sunday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center of complications after surgery. She was 80. She retired about five years ago from active management of Club Charles, which she had owned since 1951 - and operated for several early decades as the Wigwam Bar, with a sign outside depicting a teepee and offerings of "Grub and Firewater." She was born Esther West to Native American parents in Asher, Okla.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
The 1700 block of North Charles Street, home to such institutions as the Club Charles and Charles Theater, is a logical home for a place like Lost City Diner. Its quirky atmosphere, friendly service and likable (if sometimes average) food are likely to make it a hit. The restaurant opened in August 2011 but closed only a few months later, in January 2012, for "kitchen renovations. " It finally reopened, with a new owner, on April first of this year. On a recent Wednesday evening, the diner was nearly empty at 6:30, but packed by 7:30.
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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | December 29, 1992
ON New Year's Eve, when the nostalgia can flow like champagne, Baltimoreans who were around in the 1940s and '50s tell stories about the Club Charles.For a decade, the Club Charles -- the one at Charles and Preston, not the 1990s John Waters favorite "Club Chuck" a few blocks north -- was Baltimore's claim to nightclub fame.Ordinarily, New Year's Eve at the club was a scene of extravagant New York-style stage shows, complete with big-name stand-up comics (Martin and Lewis), big bands (Ted Lewis)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Lost City Diner is open again. When Lost City Diner opened, suddenly, in August 2010, it was a surprising twist in a long-running story that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles. A diner was always coming, and it never came. And then it did. The brainchild of Club Charles owner Joy Martin, Lost City Diner was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.  Then, in February 2012, just as suddenly as it opened, the Lost City Diner closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 6, 2006
I've seen my future, and it's looking good, good, good. Last month at one of Club Charles' Macabre Mondays, I got a free look at what lies ahead - courtesy of a numerologist and tarot card reader. The second Monday of every month, the club brings them in and sets up Ouija boards on the bar. My roommate Patchen and I went last month, and we both left pleased with what is to come. It's hard to go to Club Charles and not leave satisfied - having our fortunes read was the icing. Club Charles' walls are painted raw-steak red, and the lights are kept low. Though the club is not that large, the atmosphere alone can swallow you. On Mondays, you can get $1.58 draft Yuenglings, which is delightful, except after a few rounds you end up with pocketfuls of change.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 13, 1992
After 52 years on Charles Street and 40 years at the Harvey House, Lou Baumel salutes his customers like the friends they've become.He knows the worst sin in his business is not recognizing a customer by name.Lou Baumel, 75, is the acknowledged dean of Restaurant Row, which stretches from the 800 block of N. Charles St. to Danny's at the corner of Charles and Biddle streets. He's held a liquor license on the street since 1940. He and his son, Barry, operate the Harvey House. On a weekend evening, the place hums.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Lost City Diner materialized in Charles North last August. Now, the fountain shop and late-night stop is shutting down. Don't worry, though, its owner, Joy Martin, says, it's only for an intermission. Martin, who also own the Club Charles, gave no firm date for the re-opening of Lost City Diner .  In an emailed message said she's "just closing to do some renovations to the kitchen and try to get my sign up. "    When Lost City Diner opened suddenly last summer, it seemed to be the final chapter a long-running serial that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles Lost City Diner, when it revealed itself, was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements gorgeously evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 29, 1991
Cy Bloom went back to another war. Half a century ago, the city was filled with kids in uniform and middle-aged parents sending them off to battle, and Cy was giving everybody their last laughs.It's different now from his day. This time around, the nation sits by television sets as it sends its people off to war. A long time ago, they flooded Cy Bloom's Club Charles and drank to better days, and those who were there say it had the feel of a tipsy party on the last night of the world.They buried Cy Bloom the other day. His life gave out in his 80th year, but in his days and mostly in his nights, he created a party atmosphere that looked for a while as if it might last forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
Let's just say that hydroelectric dams haven't taken as long to complete as the Lost City Diner , Joy Martin's long-awaited project in the Charles North neighborhood. There were rumors of activity on the corner of Charles and Lafayette in early July, and then, on Aug. 16, word got out: The Lost City Diner was open. People had two questions: What took so long? And was it worth the wait? The answer to the first question, partly, answers the second. Martin, who owns the Club Charles, was meticulous about the diner's decor.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Louis C. Baumel, whose Harvey House restaurant and bar was a popular meeting place for more than 40 years, died Monday of complications of kidney disease at the home of his daughter in Pikesville. He was 80.The restaurant at 920 N. Charles St. was home away from home for those who reveled in its clubby and sometimes noisy atmosphere. Patrons drank its hefty cocktails and ate its aged beef and jumbo crab cakes and rode the buses it chartered to take fans to Colts football games on fall Sundays in the 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
After a day in which they temporarily became waterfront businesses, shops and cafes on North Charles Street began reopening Thursday, when the river created by a massive water main break at 20th Street receded. While several blocks remained closed to vehicular traffic, pedestrians, bicyclists and the occasional skateboarder enjoyed the dry pavement and fewer speeding cars. About 450 moviegoers headed into the Charles Theater for a talk and screening with director Oliver Stone. Restaurants welcomed back the business they lost to Wednesday's gusher from a 60-inch, 90-year-old broken main.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Lost City Diner materialized in Charles North last August. Now, the fountain shop and late-night stop has shut itself down. Don't worry, though — its owner, Joy Martin, said it's an intermission. Martin, who also own the Club Charles, gave no firm date for the reopening of Lost City. In an email, she said she's "just closing to do some renovations to the kitchen and try to get my sign up. " When Lost City Diner opened suddenly last summer, it seemed to be the final chapter of a long-running serial that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale streets, half a block up from the Club Charles Lost City Diner, when it revealed itself, was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements gorgeously evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Lost City Diner materialized in Charles North last August. Now, the fountain shop and late-night stop is shutting down. Don't worry, though, its owner, Joy Martin, says, it's only for an intermission. Martin, who also own the Club Charles, gave no firm date for the re-opening of Lost City Diner .  In an emailed message said she's "just closing to do some renovations to the kitchen and try to get my sign up. "    When Lost City Diner opened suddenly last summer, it seemed to be the final chapter a long-running serial that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles Lost City Diner, when it revealed itself, was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements gorgeously evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Let's just say that hydroelectric dams haven't taken as long to complete as the Lost City Diner , Joy Martin's long-awaited project in the Charles North neighborhood. There were rumors of activity on the corner of Charles and Lafayette in early July, and then, on Aug. 16, word got out: The Lost City Diner was open. People had two questions: What took so long? And was it worth the wait? The answer to the first question, partly, answers the second. Martin, who owns the Club Charles, was meticulous about the diner's decor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
Let's just say that hydroelectric dams haven't taken as long to complete as the Lost City Diner , Joy Martin's long-awaited project in the Charles North neighborhood. There were rumors of activity on the corner of Charles and Lafayette in early July, and then, on Aug. 16, word got out: The Lost City Diner was open. People had two questions: What took so long? And was it worth the wait? The answer to the first question, partly, answers the second. Martin, who owns the Club Charles, was meticulous about the diner's decor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
If you've never heard that Club Charles serves food, you're not alone. It's hard to imagine that a bar known for being a hangout of the tragically hip would do something as normal as serve food. But Club Charles does, and it's good. With its 1920s art deco meets "The Shining" vibe, Club Charles feels more like the backdrop to a spy movie than a place to get a pre-movie dinner. Dark and mysterious, it is, strangely, a great place for a romantic date. The downstairs gets crowded quickly after 9 p.m., so either eat early or head upstairs to enjoy a little more space.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 29, 1991
Restaurateur Cy Bloom, who died last week at 80, took a delight in greeting all his patrons by name, knowing their drink preferences and favorite songs. He was the kind of character any city could use many more of, but seem to lack today.Cy loved to circulate in a room filled with all his Baltimore regulars, mixed in with jockeys, theater people, television, radio and newspaper reporters and professional baseball players. He was equally comfortable with the bookmaker and the judge.Many people recall his Place in the Alley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | May 30, 1999
For the past two months, my favorite night out has consisted of three stops within the same block of North Charles Street. I start at the newly reopened Zodiac restaurant, where vegetarian meals (and healthy food for carnivores) are served with spicy flavor, stylish ambience and a cheerful staff.After one of the Zodiac's generous portions (the delicious veggie lasagna is big enough for two, or a great leftover lunch), I jog across the street and catch a flick at the Charles Theatre, which in its renovated form is quite possibly the most attractive and eclectically programmed art house on the East Coast.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2008
People tend not to change unless they have to. Right now, we're still going out, spending money and keeping the economy humming, maybe just a little more cautiously. But if things do get tougher, the time to start implementing good behaviors is right now. Some good habits have as much to do with maximizing your fun and budgeting your energy as they do pinching pennies. Adopting them will serve you well even in flush times. And if things do get worse, you'll be prepared. The Baltimore weekend we've outlined tells how and where to spend a wise penny and save a foolish dollar.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | April 9, 2008
Yes, the suit is frequently washed. Important to knock that question out before the story of Baltimore's Red Suit Enthusiasts gets under way in all its Spandex, silliness and super power. Transforming a thrift store find, Hunter Smith and Kathryn Long of Mount Vernon have launched a Red Suit movement, a Web site (redsuit.org) and a state of mind and body. Their touring, partying, one-size-fits-all red suit is one piece art project, one piece faux wrestling club, one piece raw human nature and literally one red piece of no-holds-barred fabric.
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