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NEWS
May 4, 2005
On May 2, 2005, CLOVIS W., beloved husband of Marie (nee Wojtkelewicz); devoted father of Diane Koubek, Janice Kraft, Jean Schmidt, Robert Morris and Karen Karloff; loving brother of Rebie Williams. Also survived by eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services private. Arrangements by CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A.
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NEWS
May 4, 2005
On May 2, 2005, CLOVIS W., beloved husband of Marie (nee Wojtkelewicz); devoted father of Diane Koubek, Janice Kraft, Jean Schmidt, Robert Morris and Karen Karloff; loving brother of Rebie Williams. Also survived by eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services private. Arrangements by CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and By Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
The First Americans, by J.M. Adovasio with Jake Page. Random House. 352 pages. $25.95. James M. Adovasio's subtitle for The First Americans is In Pursuit of Archaeology's Greatest Mystery. But he might more accurately have called it, "A broadside against those who seek to discredit my theories of American antiquity." His target, and context, is the so-called Clovis theory of how the Americas were first populated. In brief, it holds that 1930s discoveries at Clovis, N.M., a small town near the Texas border, place the earliest North American dwellers here some 10,000-11,000 years ago. Arriving from Siberia via the 90-mile Bering land (or sea)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and By Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
The First Americans, by J.M. Adovasio with Jake Page. Random House. 352 pages. $25.95. James M. Adovasio's subtitle for The First Americans is In Pursuit of Archaeology's Greatest Mystery. But he might more accurately have called it, "A broadside against those who seek to discredit my theories of American antiquity." His target, and context, is the so-called Clovis theory of how the Americas were first populated. In brief, it holds that 1930s discoveries at Clovis, N.M., a small town near the Texas border, place the earliest North American dwellers here some 10,000-11,000 years ago. Arriving from Siberia via the 90-mile Bering land (or sea)
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | May 4, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- New dating tests and other evidence are encouraging archaeologists to think that a campsite in southeastern Virginia was occupied by people more than 15,000 years ago and thus could contain the earliest known traces of human beings in North America. The findings appear to lend further support to the growing belief that the New World was occupied thousands or tens of thousands of years earlier than once thought. When, where and how people first came to the New World is the oldest mystery of American archaeology.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2000
Most people probably wouldn't have noticed it, but farmer Harold Conover happened to see a stone spear point in the sand on a logging road near his farm in Carson, Va., in 1988. That chance discovery triggered a decade-long excavation that eventually might resolve the ongoing, often bitter debate over when humans first migrated to North America. The spear point itself wasn't unusually old, but it led archaeologists Joseph and Lynn McAvoy to a prehistoric campsite that might be as much as 17,000 years old -5,500 years older than the so-called Clovis sites thought to be the oldest on this continent.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
ANDOVER, Mass. -- Richard Stockton MacNeish is a diminutive version of Indiana Jones, without the whip or pugilistic inclinations. He has an epic reputation in the field of archaeology. He is admired for his doggedness, his willingness to go anywhere no matter how rough the terrain. He began digging when he was in the eighth grade and hasn't stopped yet.He is 78, stands about 5 feet 6 inches tall. A strange, bifurcated goatee decorates his chin, and there is a shimmering reddishness about his hair and face.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 5, 1994
A couple of things strike you early on in AXIS Theatre's production of Heather McDonald's play about the birth of the Impressionist art movement, "Dream of a Common Language."First, the lighting design, by Bob Dover, is one of the most beautiful this critic has seen at Baltimore's smaller theaters. Second, the playwright uses brush strokes that are far too bold in attempting to convey the repression of women in the late 19th century.This contrast between an excessively overt script and a relatively restrained, subtle production characterizes much of director Chazz Rose's approach.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 11, 1997
A Dallas-led team of archaeologists has concluded that humans lived in southern Chile 12,500 years ago -- more than 1,000 years earlier than most scientists had believed possible.The finding suggests that researchers may have to radically revise their ideas of how humans migrated into the New World, the scientists say."This is probably the biggest change in North American archaeology in 50 years," said Alex Barker, curator of archaeology at the Dallas Museum of Natural History. Barker coordinated an expedition last month to a site known as Monte Verde, about 500 miles south of Santiago, Chile.
FEATURES
By L. D. Buckner and L. D. Buckner,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
With "Gal: A True Life," Ruthie Bolton has redefined pain. Her story, moving and ultimately inspirational, creates a wound scraped raw with each turn of the page.The force of this autobiography comes out of nowhere. From its content to its style, nothing about "Gal" is usual. Written in the earnest words of a young woman called to share her memories, Ms. Bolton's story is a transport to 1960s Charleston, S.C., to a house in Hungry Neck, where a good day was one that went to dusk without someone being beaten at the home and hand of Clovis Fleetwood.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2000
Most people probably wouldn't have noticed it, but farmer Harold Conover happened to see a stone spear point in the sand on a logging road near his farm in Carson, Va., in 1988. That chance discovery triggered a decade-long excavation that eventually might resolve the ongoing, often bitter debate over when humans first migrated to North America. The spear point itself wasn't unusually old, but it led archaeologists Joseph and Lynn McAvoy to a prehistoric campsite that might be as much as 17,000 years old -5,500 years older than the so-called Clovis sites thought to be the oldest on this continent.
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | May 4, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- New dating tests and other evidence are encouraging archaeologists to think that a campsite in southeastern Virginia was occupied by people more than 15,000 years ago and thus could contain the earliest known traces of human beings in North America. The findings appear to lend further support to the growing belief that the New World was occupied thousands or tens of thousands of years earlier than once thought. When, where and how people first came to the New World is the oldest mystery of American archaeology.
NEWS
By Toby Smith and Toby Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2000
CLOVIS, N.M. -- The Domino Theory in the high plains of the Southwest says that if you start playing the game of 42, you likely won't stop till you're covered with dirt. Dominoes goes by different names -- ends, muggins, all threes, billiton -- and different rules across the country. Depending on where you play, tiles, also known as rocks and bones, are set down end to end, side by side, sometimes in tracks. Along New Mexico's rural eastern border, with Texas just a hop away, "42" dominoes, which can be traced to before the 1920s, has for years been more popular than a cow with twin udders.
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson | August 3, 1997
PHOENIX -- Columbia City United doesn't believe in second-best, so nothing less than victory is acceptable in its boys under-18 championship match against Scott Gallagher of St. Louis in the U.S. Youth Soccer National Championships at the Rose Mofford Sports Complex.The defending national U-17 titlist overwhelmed Clovis (Calif.) United Heat in a Friday semifinal, 6-0, to advance to tonight's midnight (EDT) contest. Scott Gallagher also won its semifinal, 6-0, over the Vestavia (Ala.) Steamers.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 11, 1997
A Dallas-led team of archaeologists has concluded that humans lived in southern Chile 12,500 years ago -- more than 1,000 years earlier than most scientists had believed possible.The finding suggests that researchers may have to radically revise their ideas of how humans migrated into the New World, the scientists say."This is probably the biggest change in North American archaeology in 50 years," said Alex Barker, curator of archaeology at the Dallas Museum of Natural History. Barker coordinated an expedition last month to a site known as Monte Verde, about 500 miles south of Santiago, Chile.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
ANDOVER, Mass. -- Richard Stockton MacNeish is a diminutive version of Indiana Jones, without the whip or pugilistic inclinations. He has an epic reputation in the field of archaeology. He is admired for his doggedness, his willingness to go anywhere no matter how rough the terrain. He began digging when he was in the eighth grade and hasn't stopped yet.He is 78, stands about 5 feet 6 inches tall. A strange, bifurcated goatee decorates his chin, and there is a shimmering reddishness about his hair and face.
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson | August 3, 1997
PHOENIX -- Columbia City United doesn't believe in second-best, so nothing less than victory is acceptable in its boys under-18 championship match against Scott Gallagher of St. Louis in the U.S. Youth Soccer National Championships at the Rose Mofford Sports Complex.The defending national U-17 titlist overwhelmed Clovis (Calif.) United Heat in a Friday semifinal, 6-0, to advance to tonight's midnight (EDT) contest. Scott Gallagher also won its semifinal, 6-0, over the Vestavia (Ala.) Steamers.
NEWS
By Toby Smith and Toby Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2000
CLOVIS, N.M. -- The Domino Theory in the high plains of the Southwest says that if you start playing the game of 42, you likely won't stop till you're covered with dirt. Dominoes goes by different names -- ends, muggins, all threes, billiton -- and different rules across the country. Depending on where you play, tiles, also known as rocks and bones, are set down end to end, side by side, sometimes in tracks. Along New Mexico's rural eastern border, with Texas just a hop away, "42" dominoes, which can be traced to before the 1920s, has for years been more popular than a cow with twin udders.
FEATURES
By L. D. Buckner and L. D. Buckner,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
With "Gal: A True Life," Ruthie Bolton has redefined pain. Her story, moving and ultimately inspirational, creates a wound scraped raw with each turn of the page.The force of this autobiography comes out of nowhere. From its content to its style, nothing about "Gal" is usual. Written in the earnest words of a young woman called to share her memories, Ms. Bolton's story is a transport to 1960s Charleston, S.C., to a house in Hungry Neck, where a good day was one that went to dusk without someone being beaten at the home and hand of Clovis Fleetwood.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 5, 1994
A couple of things strike you early on in AXIS Theatre's production of Heather McDonald's play about the birth of the Impressionist art movement, "Dream of a Common Language."First, the lighting design, by Bob Dover, is one of the most beautiful this critic has seen at Baltimore's smaller theaters. Second, the playwright uses brush strokes that are far too bold in attempting to convey the repression of women in the late 19th century.This contrast between an excessively overt script and a relatively restrained, subtle production characterizes much of director Chazz Rose's approach.
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