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By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | July 26, 1992
Though it may seem as incongruous as Hulk Hogan doing a deodorant commercial, Americans are embracing the distinctive aroma and flavor of garlic. Fresh garlic consumption more than doubled in the past decade. Furthermore, eating the least lovely member of the lily family has become a sign of worldliness and common sense.Why? Because Europeans and Asians with garlic on their breath have been eating better and living longer than those among us who eschew allium sativum. Garlic now has a place of honor in the kitchens of the nation's most sophisticated restaurants, be they Italian, Chinese or contemporary American.
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By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | October 27, 2008
If the price is too good to be real, the drug might be a fake! With Nexium more than $4 a pill, I ordered it from an online Canadian drugstore. When the pills came, they were from India, and they were generic. This medicine did not work, and now I have my asthma symptoms and cough back. I don't know what I will do, since I can't afford the name brand! Acid-suppressing drugs such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix can relieve reflux. Some people with this condition develop other symptoms, such as asthma or cough, as a result of acid irritation.
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By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The sprinkle of nutmeg on the eggnog, the whiff of gingerbread cookies baking in the oven, the aroma of cinnamon, cloves and allspice in the cider. These are the scents of the season. "They definitely bring up Christmas memories," says Ann D. Wilder, president of Vann's Spices, who lists allspice, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon as the spices she most closely associates with the holidays. "It's what Christmas smells like to me, with a little evergreen thrown in." These spices, along with perhaps star anise and cardamom, have been enhancing Christmas recipes for centuries.
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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | July 16, 2008
How can you tell whether a head of garlic will have little green shoots inside the cloves? I don't think there's a reliable way to tell. The green sprout in the middle really is a sprout; it's a sign that the head of garlic is older and is trying to put out a shoot. The main thing is to make sure you buy heads that are firm with tight cloves and dry skin. Don't buy garlic that looks shriveled or has soft cloves, and don't buy whole heads that have been kept in a refrigerated case (although I haven't seen stores doing that for quite a while)
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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | July 16, 2008
How can you tell whether a head of garlic will have little green shoots inside the cloves? I don't think there's a reliable way to tell. The green sprout in the middle really is a sprout; it's a sign that the head of garlic is older and is trying to put out a shoot. The main thing is to make sure you buy heads that are firm with tight cloves and dry skin. Don't buy garlic that looks shriveled or has soft cloves, and don't buy whole heads that have been kept in a refrigerated case (although I haven't seen stores doing that for quite a while)
FEATURES
September 21, 1997
I have two beautiful lilacs with leaves that are covered with a pale white powder. The garden-center people said it was powdery mildew and recommended I buy a rather expensive fungicide to control it. Will this disease hurt my trees, and what is the best treatment?Powdery mildew, a common fungal disease, is usually seen on susceptible lilacs by the end of summer. It sounds as if your lilacs are severely infected, so treatment with a fungicide at this time and again in the spring during budbreak is warranted.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 27, 2007
Evelyn Sakers of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for a blackberry roly poly similar to the one her mother-in-law used to make. Sadly, no one in her family can remember how it was made; all they can remember is how delicious it was. Anne Marie Weer of Goldsboro sent in a recipe that came from a 1932 edition of the Pictorial Review Standard Cookbook. She says that she usually makes it using blueberries instead of blackberries. When I tested her recipe, I used a combination of blackberries and blueberries and cut back some on the sugar.
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By Dallas Morning News | July 28, 1993
A trip to your local farmers' market provides more than lunch. When it's too hot to play outside, let the kids practice a different kind of culinary art, turning produce into a menagerie of fanciful creatures.These animals are made entirely from fruits, vegetables and other edibles, with a few toothpicks thrown in for structural support.Your kids can copy these designs or come up with their own. The possibilities are as endless as their imaginations and the offerings of your local produce bin.Set up a work place in the kitchen, gather the supplies and get creative.
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By Dolly Merritt | November 20, 1993
Around the house* When stuffing poultry, use special care. Bacteria from raw poultry can grow in the stuffing and it is safer to cook as a separate dish. If you are going to stuff a turkey or chicken, fill the cavity loosely -- no more than 2/3 full -- immediately before cooking. Remove dressing immediately after cooking.* If you use whole garlic cloves for marinating or cooking various foods, try skewering cloves with a toothpick. When dish is ready to serve, you can find garlic more easily and toss clove and toothpick away.
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By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
John Walsh, executive chef at Chef's Expressions, says he and owner Jerry Edwards came up with this recipe after tasting a sauvignon blanc with hints of green apple and clove. "We thought the scallops would go great with it," Walsh says. "The beurre blanc just brings it all together." SCALLOPS IN CLOVE BEURRE BLANC MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS 20 to 24 giant scallops with attachment muscle removed (about 1 1 / 4 pounds) flour for dredging sea salt and white pepper 1 pint heavy cream 12 whole cloves 3 sliced shallots 1 / 2 pound butter (divided use)
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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,Tribune Media Services | August 12, 2007
The inspiration for this main course comes from a fabulous dish I sampled in Paris last month in a neighborhood restaurant. When I couldn't decide what to choose, our waiter recommended the 7-hour roasted lamb. Slowly roasted in the oven until fork tender, the lamb was delectable, but it was the simple, elegant presentation of the entree that caught my eye. Set in the center of the plate on a bed of pureed eggplant, the meat was surrounded by a garland of roasted cherry tomatoes and roasted garlic cloves.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 27, 2007
Evelyn Sakers of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for a blackberry roly poly similar to the one her mother-in-law used to make. Sadly, no one in her family can remember how it was made; all they can remember is how delicious it was. Anne Marie Weer of Goldsboro sent in a recipe that came from a 1932 edition of the Pictorial Review Standard Cookbook. She says that she usually makes it using blueberries instead of blackberries. When I tested her recipe, I used a combination of blackberries and blueberries and cut back some on the sugar.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 17, 2007
Charlie Palmer's Practical Guide to the New American Kitchen By Charlie Palmer A Man & His Meatballs The Hilarious but True Story of a Self-Taught Chef and Restaurateur By John LaFemina with Pam Manela Regan Books / 2006 / $27.95 "Hilarious" might be a stretch, but this memoir/cookbook will be surprisingly absorbing for anyone who's idly dreamed of starting a restaurant. John LaFemina tells an entertaining tale of New York entrepreneurship. A jeweler, he got into the restaurant business as an investor, then an owner and only then decided to master the art and science of cooking.
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By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | October 21, 2006
My compost pile has now turned to rich black dirt and I was ready to put it into my garden, but I noticed reddish-brown bugs throughout that look like cockroaches. Is it safe to use? Should I spray it with something? You probably see a type of beetle. There are some outdoor species of cockroaches that do not breed or survive indoors. Many types of soil invertebrates like earthworms, grubs, maggots, ants and beetles help break down the materials in compost piles. When the compost is spread, these insects usually disperse and are not a problem.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
John Walsh, executive chef at Chef's Expressions, says he and owner Jerry Edwards came up with this recipe after tasting a sauvignon blanc with hints of green apple and clove. "We thought the scallops would go great with it," Walsh says. "The beurre blanc just brings it all together." SCALLOPS IN CLOVE BEURRE BLANC MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS 20 to 24 giant scallops with attachment muscle removed (about 1 1 / 4 pounds) flour for dredging sea salt and white pepper 1 pint heavy cream 12 whole cloves 3 sliced shallots 1 / 2 pound butter (divided use)
NEWS
December 14, 2005
Allspice Allspice comes from the dried, unripened fruit of a small evergreen tree in the Carribbean and has a flavor suggesting a blend of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. It was exported to Europe in the early 1600s as a substitution for cardamom. It is used in seasonings, sauces, sausages, ketchup, jams, pumpkin, gravies, roasts, hams, baked goods and teas. Cinnamon Cinnamon comes from the dried inner bark of various evergreen trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamomum burmannii is primarily imported from Indonesia and is the most common form of cinnamon in the United States.
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By Michael Dresser | August 18, 1999
1997 Pacific Rim Gewurztraminer, Monterey County ($12).Pacific Rim is one of the seemingly endless supply of labels used by Randall Grahm, the mad genius of Bonny Doon winery. Here he uses it for a dry gewurztraminer that is one of the best to come out of California. Its structure and spicy flavors might not exactly replicate the flavors of an Alsace wine, but they come pretty close. This lively white wine with hints of tropical fruit, pears and cloves would be an excellent match with spicy Asian cuisine such as Sichuan-style kung pao chicken.
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By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | January 18, 1994
Is garlic a health food?Researchers are toying with clues that garlic may indeed offer health benefits beyond its ability to tempt us into eating really delicious food.A review of evidence from five clinical trials published recently in Environmental Nutrition newsletter showed that one-half to one clove per day lowered blood cholesterol levels by an average of 9 percent in people with borderline and high cholesterol.In various studies, garlic powder, aged garlic extracts and fresh garlic have all been known to have some effect in preventing cancer in animals.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The sprinkle of nutmeg on the eggnog, the whiff of gingerbread cookies baking in the oven, the aroma of cinnamon, cloves and allspice in the cider. These are the scents of the season. "They definitely bring up Christmas memories," says Ann D. Wilder, president of Vann's Spices, who lists allspice, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon as the spices she most closely associates with the holidays. "It's what Christmas smells like to me, with a little evergreen thrown in." These spices, along with perhaps star anise and cardamom, have been enhancing Christmas recipes for centuries.
NEWS
November 18, 2005
I have been eating two cloves of raw garlic every day at my evening meal. It may be a coincidence, but I have not had a cold in more than 10 years, and I don't get sick for any other reason either. I'm 84 years old and am shooting for 120. Garlic has a long history of medicinal use. As far back as Hippocrates, healers used it for toothaches and chest pain. Grandmothers have been administering garlic for centuries to overcome colds and other respiratory infections. Although there is no scientific evidence to validate garlic's power against viral infections, eating two cloves daily may keep others so far away that they can't give you their colds.
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