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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Mike Mansfield, the longest-serving Senate majority leader, who shepherded landmark legislation in the 1960s and 1970s on issues from civil rights to political reform and set a standard for civility in a lawmaking arena now often the scene of partisan vitriol, died yesterday. He was 98. Mansfield, who underwent surgery Sept. 7 to have a pacemaker implanted in his chest, died at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, said Charles Ferris, his attorney and one-time Senate aide. After he left the Senate in 1977, Mansfield was U.S. ambassador to Japan and wielded significant influence in Tokyo for more than 11 years as the emissary of Democratic and Republican presidents.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin, Sumathi Reddy and Ivan Penn and David Nitkin, Sumathi Reddy and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
The Maryland General Assembly concluded its 90-day session last night riven by the same partisan feuding in which it began, with a divisive plan to spend state money on embryonic stem-cell research dying under the threat of a Senate filibuster that never came to pass. The political jockeying between Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and a Democrat-controlled legislature intensified in the third year of the governor's term and looks to continue through the next election. With confetti dropping inside the State House at midnight, Democratic leaders said they had done right by working Marylanders this year, increasing the state's minimum wage to $6.15 an hour and by imposing a tax on large corporations - effectively just Wal-Mart - that do not spend a prescribed percentage of payroll on employee health benefits.
NEWS
By David Nitkin, Sumathi Reddy and Ivan Penn and David Nitkin, Sumathi Reddy and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
The Maryland General Assembly concluded its 90-day session last night riven by the same partisan feuding in which it began, with a divisive plan to spend state money on embryonic stem-cell research dying under the threat of a Senate filibuster that never came to pass. The political jockeying between Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and a Democrat-controlled legislature intensified in the third year of the governor's term and looks to continue through the next election. With confetti dropping inside the State House at midnight, Democratic leaders said they had done right by working Marylanders this year, increasing the state's minimum wage to $6.15 an hour and by imposing a tax on large corporations - effectively just Wal-Mart - that do not spend a prescribed percentage of payroll on employee health benefits.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
The Employment Non-Discrimination Act, a bill that would ban hiring and employment discrimination against LGBT individuals, will proceed in the Senate after 61 senators voted for a cloture motion that will lead to a final vote on the bill. Maryland Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin were among the legislators to vote "yes" on cloture, which limits the amount of time ENDA can be debated before a final vote on the measure is eventually held.  Seven Republicans voted in support of the bill: ENDA co-sponsors Sens.
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne | October 5, 1999
DID Republican insistence in 1962 on a place for the private sector in space communications help set the stage for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964? This novel insight into the most significant social legislation of this half-century is put forward in a new book, "Mike Mansfield: Majority Leader," by Francis R. "Frank" Valeo, a Senate insider during the turbulent '60s and '70s.Although Mr. Mansfield, at 96, is the deserving hero of the Valeo study, he does not subscribe to the author's linkage of the creation of the Comsat Corp.
NEWS
November 30, 2013
In the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence it specifically states that "all men are created equal. " My fellow Democrats in the U.S. Senate did the unthinkable when they changed the filibuster (cloture) rules. They erected the ultimate fence in favor of Democrats and against the rest of the citizens of the United States. The Democrats now have opened our judicial system to suspicion. Will the letter of the laws of our land apply equally if you are a Republican or independent?
NEWS
July 5, 1995
DR. HENRY W. Foster Jr., the president's controversial nominee for surgeon general, ran afoul of the Senate's fabled filibuster rule recently. For those unfamiliar with the history of this parliamentary maneuver, here is some background, courtesy of the Washington Times:"Filibuster derives from the Dutch word 'vrijbuiter,' which means free booty, and the Spanish 'filibustero' -- West Indian pirates who used a small ship called the filibot."In the 1850s, the word began to be used to describe speeches in Congress used for disruptive purposes.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | June 9, 1994
THE PRIZE exhibit in my political reliquary is the tally sheet of the yeas and nays I took in the Senate press gallery 30 years ago tomorrow, when the Senate cast its most significant, influential vote in modern times.I wrote here last month when everybody was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education, the desegregation decision, that Congress in 1964 did something far more important than the Supreme Court did in 1954, insofar as civil rights is concerned. Today I explain how and why.The 1954 court ruling applied only to education, yet all aspects of Southern life were segregated in 1954.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Breaking a Republican filibuster, the Senate enacted legislation yesterday that will allow federal agencies to offer employees up to $25,000 to resign or retire early, and sent the bill to President Clinton for his signature.Without the bill, a tool in the administration's effort to reduce the federal work force by 252,000 as part of its "reinventing government" program, some agencies would have had to lay off workers, a process that buyout supporters claimed would have been far more disruptive and more costly.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN Jr | April 11, 1993
The Senate filibuster ought to have a romantic, courageous resonance in a nation that praises individuality and admires the minority that stands up to an overbearing majority.But filibustering isn't romanticized or admired, because Southern senators opposed to basic civil rights for black Americans gave the exercise a bad name.From 1917 to 1961, there were nine filibusters directed against civil rights bills. (Plus two directed against changing the filibuster rule.) All succeeded. The defeated legislation in every case was as strongly supported in the rest of the nation as it was opposed in the South.
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