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NEWS
November 11, 1990
P. Edward Fine, who practiced law before entering the men's clothing business, died Friday of cancer at his home in the Club House Condominium in Northwest Baltimore.Mr. Fine, who was 89, and his wife operated Edwards Men's and FTC Boys Shop in Overlea from 1940 until 1968. After retiring from his store, he worked part time as a salesman at the Young's Men's Shop in Hamilton until 1980.From 1924 until 1940, he practiced law with a brother-in-law, the late H. Mortimer Kremer.Mr. Fine was born in Baltimore and graduated from City College and the University of Maryland law school.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 1, 2014
If you own shares in Jos. A. Bank or run a small business in the Carroll County town of Hampstead, where the menswear company is headquartered, your reasons for caring about the outcome of the current hostilities between Joe Bank and the Men's Wearhouse are obviously financial. Not so much for the rest of us. For the rest of us, the interest lay in the bidding, with Joe Bank, the Men's Wearhouse and Eddie Bauer all caught up in a five-month, corporate-takeover drama. Someone could have produced a reality TV show about all this by now: Bank's attempt to buy Men's, Men's attempt to buy Bank, Bank buying Bauer, and Men's getting ticked off about the whole thing.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1997
Frank Tworecke has been in Baltimore for only 2 1/2 years, but the president of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers knows his local market down to its buttonholes, pleats and lightweight woolen jackets.Tworecke also has his hand in a good cause, the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, for which he has collaborated on the Miracle Collection II, a new line of ties and suspenders inspired by the molecular structure of pediatric drugs. All proceeds from these colorful accessories benefit the Children's Center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Richard M. Lansburgh, a retired clothier, philanthropist and patron of the arts, died of multiple organ failure Tuesday at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center, one day before his 92nd birthday. He lived in North Baltimore. He was born during a record-setting blizzard in 1922 at his parents' Park Heights Avenue home, Terremont. His father, Sidney Lansburgh, was an official of American General Corp., and his mother, Marian Epstein, was the daughter of Jacob Epstein, who created a flourishing wholesale merchandise business, the Baltimore Bargain House.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 6, 1991
At the festive unveiling of a new ad campaign featuring a flock of sheep yesterday, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. gave a serious announcement that also was a cause for celebration: A preliminary agreement was reached early yesterday to convert its $50 million in "junk-bond" debt into equity.Under the direction of its new turnaround management team, the Owings Mills-based clothier said that it had reached an agreement with Bank's 13 bondholders to convert the debt, which Bank took on during a leveraged buyout in 1986 arranged by the now-defunct Drexel Burnham Lambert.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney and Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. finally pulled the trigger yesterday on the long-speculated closing of its Hampstead sewing factory, a decision that the retailer said will create "substantial savings" but eliminate about 100 workers from the payroll.The 35,000-square-foot factory, which manufactures suit jackets and sports coats, will close in early February and may be sold or put to some other use.Already, 28 employees have been transferred to the company's tailoring division. The other workers will receive what was described as standard severance packages.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2002
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said yesterday that a four-month selling spree left the company with little on the hangers to peddle, causing same-store sales to dip last month. Overall sales were up for the month, and they were particularly strong in catalog and Internet sales, but same-store sales were down 3.7 percent. Same-store sales, sales from stores open more than a year, are a key measurement of retailers' performance. The news drove Bank's shares down $3.20, or 16 percent, to close yesterday at $16.75.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. says the kind of heavy promotions for which it has been criticized in the past is helping it through a turbulent economy. The Hampstead-based men's retailer said yesterday that fiscal fourth-quarter comparable sales, or for those stores open at least a year, jumped 13 percent, while yearly sales increased 8.9 percent. Net income for the fourth quarter ended Jan. 31 was $30.4 million, or $1.66 per share, compared with $26.5 million, or $1.45 per share, the year before.
NEWS
By Amy Miller and Amy Miller,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, based in Hampstead, just completed its most successful year in the past five, Ed Jecelin, vice president for manufacturing, told members of the Carroll County Economic Development Commission yesterday.EDC members toured the plant and corporate headquarters yesterday in an effort to better understand the county business."We're glad to be in Carroll County and we want to stay as long as we can," Mr. Jecelin said.The company, which was in financial trouble a little over a year ago, has opened 10 new stores and plans to hire 40 more employees in the next two to three months, he said.
NEWS
November 20, 1990
A 1985 file photo in Saturday's Business Section may have given the impression that Stephen L. Snyder, a Baltimore lawyer, was still involved with Bernard Hill Inc., the Elkridge-based clothier that is going out of business. According to Mr. Snyder, he has not been affiliated with the company in any capacity since 1986.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Men's clothing retailer Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. is in talks to acquire the Eddie Bauer chain of stores specializing in outerwear and casual attire, the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday. Such a deal would disrupt the long saga of dueling takeover bids between Bank and rival discount suit clothier Men's Wearhouse Inc. The Wall Street Journal, in reporting the talks, cited people familiar with the matter. Thomas Davies, a spokesman for Hampstead-based Bank declined to comment Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Anthony Mayes was nearing age 50 when he got the first suit he ever owned, a dark gray Armani, and it seemed life, at last, would be better. He'd just been released from his latest time behind bars, making it about 22 years of his life total, for an array of charges including drugs and armed robbery. He said he's determined to make his most recent six-month stint his last, and sees the clothes - suit, shirt, tie, dress shoes - as part of that effort. "They make me feel important, like I can succeed," said Mayes, 49, who believes he's been given "an opportunity to redeem myself.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Clothing firm Tom James Co. has opened a national distribution center in Carroll County and is expanding another operation there, the state said Tuesday. Tom James expects to add 75 jobs in the next five years as a result of both moves, the governor's office and Carroll officials said in a joint announcement. The company's Carlisle Etcetera LLC, which makes couture dresses, suits and other high-fashion items, moved the distribution center from New York to Westminster. Tom James' English American Tailoring Co. - a made-to-order clothing manufacturer that already employed 380 people in Westminster - is expanding its custom men's apparel facility there.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
John Ciambruschini began learning to handcraft garments as a teenage apprentice to his father in Rome, tailoring made-to-order suits, slacks, dresses and skirts. After immigrating to the United States in 1958 at age 20, Ciambruschini worked at the now-closed Botany 500 suit factory in Philadelphia and Haas Tailoring Co. in Baltimore, where he created custom patterns. After a stint designing men's clothes in San Antonio he returned to Baltimore in the mid-1970s for a job at the Charles Village shop Custom Gentleman Ltd., which he later bought.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Men's Wearhouse's $1.2 billion turnabout offer for Jos. A. Bank Clothiers might have painted the smaller men's retailer into a corner. After all, it was Jos. Bank's idea to combine the two companies with its now-withdrawn $2.3 billion offer for Men's Wearhouse. But Hampstead-based Jos. Bank is taking its time to respond and suggested Thursday that it was exploring other acquisition options. Perhaps Jos. Bank is playing coy and trying to extract a better offer from Men's Wearhouse, given its solid third-quarter results, but maybe it intends to spurn the offer just as Men's Wearhouse snubbed its bid. And maybe, one analyst suggested, it will go back after Men's Wearhouse with a richer offer.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. faces a difficult fight in its $2.3 billion quest to acquire rival Men's Wearhouse, experts say. And that's not only because Houston-based Men's Wearhouse said it doesn't want to sell out to Jos. A. Bank. The struggling Hampstead-based retailer went public Wednesday with its bid to merge the two leading men's tailored apparel chains into a $3.5 billion powerhouse with 1,745 stores. Within hours, Men's Wearhouse rebuffed the offer as inadequate, then adopted a "poison pill" to deter an unfriendly acquisition.
NEWS
October 23, 2002
William J. Clothier II, 86, a former tennis star, international spy and grandson of the co-founder of the Strawbridge & Clothier department stores, died of leukemia Saturday at his home in Valley Forge, Pa. While Mr. Clothier won national tennis titles, he also was secretly working as a special agent for the FBI and later worked for the CIA. Mr. Clothier, whose father, William J. Clothier, was a national singles champion, toured on the grass-court circuit...
NEWS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | November 6, 1996
RUSSELL, Kan. -- Some thought the presidential library should be near the boyhood home, while others fancied sites near the county courthouse.Either way, weary travelers on Interstate 70 would pull off in Russell, to visit "Bob Dole Country." They'd hear how the 43rd president of the United States grew up humble. International scholars would peruse his official papers.This was the dream that Russell shared with Bob Dole, until it was shattered last night."In Russell you've got BD and AD -- Before Dole and After Dole," said Dean Banker, a Russell clothier.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Difficulties continued in the second quarter for Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc., but shareholders reacted well to steps the men's retailer took to address their concerns. Jos. A. Bank announced Thursday that its profits slumped 38 percent in the quarter that ended Aug. 3 after a promotional campaign failed to lure shoppers. The Hampstead-based chain earned $14.2 million, or 51 cents a share, in the second quarter, down from $23.2 million, or 83 cents a share, a year earlier. Sales fell nearly 11 percent, to $232.5 million from $260.3 million.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers faces a growing shareholder revolt as demonstrated by an institutional investor's open letter last week calling for the Hampstead-based retailer to return its growing cash reserve to owners of its stock. BeaconLight Capital LLC, a New York-based investment manager that owns more than 1 percent of Jos. A. Bank, also urged the men's apparel chain to reorganize its board, realign management incentives and drop its strategy of pursuing acquisitions with its cash.
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