Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCloser To Home
IN THE NEWS

Closer To Home

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrew Jacobs and Andrew Jacobs,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2001
JACKSON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - With their children grown and out of the house, Georgina and Richard Davis faced something of a dilemma. They could have put mothballs in the empty bedrooms in their rambling colonial home and continued paying the lawn doctor, the pool cleaner and the person who cleaned up after their dogs. Or they could have followed their parents' generation and migrated to a low-maintenance retirement complex in Florida. But the Davises chose the kind of move that is gaining appeal for baby boomers, who began turning 55 this year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2014
On the front page of The Baltimore Sun is an article about the Office of Health Care Quality which is apparently unable to perform its mission: "…the office, which is part of the health department, has acknowledged that it does not meet the requirements of some state or federal laws" ( "Md. health agency cutting back on facilities it inspects," July 20). Sounds like it's underperforming, doesn't it? It's scary, isn't it? On page 6 of the same edition, Gov. Martin O'Malley is quoted as saying: "We don't have to accept underperforming bureaucracies, agencies or departments.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 18, 2002
The Department of Juvenile Justice has asked the Board of Public Works to postpone voting on a contract today under which some offenders would be transported to Pennsylvania, Secretary Bishop L. Robinson announced yesterday. The announcement came on the same day that The Sun reported details of the contract and opposition to it from children's welfare advocates. The three-year contract would have been worth up to $11.7 million to the Devereux Foundation of Devon, Pa., if it had been approved by the board.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Date: Oct. 13 Her story: Nicole Garrett, 28, grew up in Pittsburgh. Serving in the Army for the past seven years, she is now an officer. Her parents, Lance and Kathy Garrett, live in Pittsburgh. His story: Ron Vinyard, 31, grew up in St. Louis. He has served in the Army since 2004 and is also an officer. His parents, Ron and Laura Schupmann, live in St. Louis. Their story: Nicole and Ron met in 2011 during their deployment in Afghanistan. They collaborated on targeting missions against enemy forces.
TRAVEL
December 29, 2002
It's time once again to show off our readers' best photos of the past year. Contributors to the Personal Journeys page of the Travel Section ventured forth in 2002, but, reflecting a continuing trend in travel, many of them stayed closer to home. Of the 10 images featured on this page and inside the section, four were taken in the continental United States, two in Canada and two in the Caribbean. (Photos from New Zealand and India round out the offerings.) Considering the worrisome economy and the threat of war in Iraq, it's hard to know what the new year will hold for travelers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 1, 2000
Westminster's new full-service state Motor Vehicle Administration office will open to the public Aug. 28. The office, which will serve 400 to 500 customers a day, will process all motor vehicle transactions, including titles, registrations and license renewals. It will also feature a motorcycle and automobile test course. The office, at 1106 Baltimore Blvd., will replace MVA Express at 532 Baltimore Blvd. The last day for MVA Express is Aug. 25. The full-service MVA office closest to Westminster is in Frederick.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | August 23, 2009
Despite hot weather early in the week, the annual eight-day-long Howard County Fair saw slightly higher attendance this year, cheering organizers. "We went into the fair very apprehensive about the economy," said H. Mitchell "Mickey" Day, fair association president and chief of the nearby West Friendship Volunteer Fire Department. Despite that, Day said attendance was between 84,000 and 85,000 people, a 2 percent increase over last year, which was "a banner year," he said. The slightly higher gate receipts will enable the nonprofit fair association to do some needed paving at the fairgrounds, and also consider an upgrade to the 4-H building.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- Running back Vernon Smith, who like Virginia Tech's Antonio Freeman was a first-team All-Metro for Poly in 1989, has transferred to Maryland.Smith played in 1990 and '91 for Division I-AA Villanova, gaining 605 yards as a sophomore, but underwent knee surgery after the season. Smith withdrew from Villanova before the start of the 1992 season, but returned the following semester and had a 65-yard touchdown run in the Wildcats' 1993 spring game.Smith withdrew a second time from Villanova in May, citing personal reasons.
NEWS
By Fernando Goncalves | October 29, 1990
The opening of a new group home in Northwest Baltimore recently has allowed four mentally retarded young people who had been treated out of state to return to Maryland, where they can be closer to their families and their care costs considerably less.The home, on Thornbury Road in Mount Washington, is operated under the auspices of the Chimes -- a private, non-profit program based in Baltimore that provides education, vocational training and supervised homes to children and adults who are mentally retarded or have related conditions.
NEWS
October 6, 2001
BY 2030, the Baltimore region's over-65 age group will nearly double while the 35-54 bracket will decrease. Conclusion: A labor shortage is likely. The region's population will grow, meaning more traffic headaches. Future residential development will increasingly bulge into today's rural or semi-rural areas. Poverty will spread from Baltimore City to surrounding areas. The number of schoolchildren entitled to subsidized lunches is already steadily creeping up, and is projected to grow.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
The Columbia Flier noted, recently, that the multimillion dollar Horizon Foundation, whose purpose is to address local Howard County health issues, spent $40,000 on ads to convince Coca Cola to amend its advertising of sugary drinks. The Horizon Foundation has chosen not to fund numerous Howard County nonprofit organizations, including Grassroots, that serve the indigent and mentally ill of Howard County. Instead, Horizon Foundation decided its purpose is to address a very important national issue - Coca Cola, and its national advertising.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
The Shops at Canton Crossing, a sprawling $105 million shopping center on Boston Street in Canton, has been years in the making. In preparation for its official opening Tuesday afternoon, landscape crews planted trees Monday along pathways dotted with benches and bike racks, workers at Old Navy arranged jeans and sweater displays, and servers at Mission BBQ prepared to serve their first lunch. About two-thirds of the center's 30 shops and restaurants have opened or are on the verge of opening, among them Target's 135,000-square-foot anchor store; Michaels; DSW Shoe Warehouse; Ulta Beauty; Loft; Five Below; and Vitamin Shoppe.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 2013
You might not want to spend a lot of time in Norway in January, but listening to a couple of hours of Norwegian music in a Howard County church sounds inviting. The Orchestra of St. John's vicariously takes you to Norway with "A Winter's Concert - Norwegian Moods," being performed on Sunday, Jan. 13 at 4 p.m. at St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City. "Everybody thinks of Norway as a cold place with fjords and icy scenery, but not as one of the most important centers of music," observes Ronald Mutchnik, artistic director of the Orchestra of St. John's.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
When Tadgh Prendeville moved from his native Ireland to Baltimore for work more than a decade ago, he couldn't play Gaelic football without going to Washington. The same was true for Lucy Clerkin in her pursuit to play camogie, or hurling for women, which the Maryland native learned while visiting her grandmother in Ireland. Eventually, Prendeville and Clerkin found themselves commuting together to Washington for weeknight practices and weekend games as members of the Washington Gaels.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
Lawsuits brought by government and private parties to address damage done to the environment became a necessary fact of life in this country long ago. In a perfect world, perhaps nobody would pollute — or at least those who did would immediately and appropriately be corrected by a government agency. But the real world sometimes requires court orders. It is in that context that Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's recent decision to file notice of intent to sue Chesapeake Energy Corp.
NEWS
February 24, 2011
Recent articles in your newspaper have shown the chaos, turmoil and revolutions happening in the Middle East, starting with Egypt, and spreading to other Middle East nations. The revolution in Egypt may turn for the worse as The Muslim Brotherhood has a strong probability of taking over, and this group is anti-Israel and anti-American. This, coupled with other extremist Islamic countries, poses a real danger to the USA by stopping the flow of oil to our country. With all of this turmoil happening, the gas prices are soaring at the pump along with food prices and other commodities.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
With soaring prices putting homes out of reach of many Baltimore-area workers such as firefighters, teachers and secretaries, an unusual coalition including real estate interests and advocates for the poor called on the state yesterday to act to boost the supply of "work force" housing. "We're in the midst of a crisis," Ed Gold, president of the Home Builders Association of Maryland, said during a one-day conference on housing affordability at a downtown Baltimore hotel. With homes in Baltimore's suburbs selling last month for $250,000 to nearly $390,000 on average, more and more police officers, firefighters and other public employees are moving an hour or more from their jobs to find houses they can afford, speakers said.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
If politics is a horse race, then pollster Patrick E. Gonzales risks becoming the 300-pound jockey of Anne Arundel County.After leaving a job two years ago with Mason-Dixon Opinion Research to start his own consulting business, PEG Research, he has ridden two Democratic campaigns into the dirt.Gonzales was first thrown from his mount last year after suiting up as the pollster for Annapolis Mayor Dennis M. Callahan's losing primary bid for re-election.And last week, he never approached the finish line as campaign manager for County Councilman Michael F. Gilligan, who pulled up lame in the primary race for county executive.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | August 23, 2009
Despite hot weather early in the week, the annual eight-day-long Howard County Fair saw slightly higher attendance this year, cheering organizers. "We went into the fair very apprehensive about the economy," said H. Mitchell "Mickey" Day, fair association president and chief of the nearby West Friendship Volunteer Fire Department. Despite that, Day said attendance was between 84,000 and 85,000 people, a 2 percent increase over last year, which was "a banner year," he said. The slightly higher gate receipts will enable the nonprofit fair association to do some needed paving at the fairgrounds, and also consider an upgrade to the 4-H building.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
Maryland accepted a bid yesterday to play Nevada, a Western Athletic Conference team with the nation's second-ranked running game, in the Humanitarian Bowl on Dec. 30 in Boise, Idaho. The bid was expected. Officials of the bowl, which has the eighth pick of Atlantic Coast Conference teams, had publicly expressed interest in the Terrapins, who finished 7-5 after losing three of their last four regular-season games. Many Maryland fans had hoped for a game closer to home, and one in a warm-weather climate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.