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Closed Circuit Television

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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
The People's Court it's not.But then the new closed-circuit television system the county started using for bond hearings last week was never meant to be entertaining. It was designed for security. Defendants remain at the detention center while a judge in District Court decides what bond, if any, to impose.From the bench, the judge uses a video-game style keyboard. Miniature digital cameras take pictures of the defendant, the defendant's attorney and the judge.The cameras, which look like two small speakers on top of a 26-inch TV set, focus automatically, use normal lighting and need no special acoustical equipment.
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NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
A District Court judge will decide Monday whether the use of video bail reviews for Baltimore inmates violates their rights and could suspend use of the poorly performing closed-circuit television system. If Judge Keith E. Matthews rules as the state public defender's office has asked, officials could find themselves cramming dozens of cases daily onto the docket at the jail's single courtroom - or busing defendants to city district courthouses for in-person bail reviews. As another alternative, the public defender's office has asked the judge to release all defendants on their own recognizance.
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NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
A District Court judge will decide Monday whether the use of video bail reviews for Baltimore inmates violates their rights and could suspend use of the poorly performing closed-circuit television system. If Judge Keith E. Matthews rules as the state public defender's office has asked, officials could find themselves cramming dozens of cases daily onto the docket at the jail's single courtroom - or busing defendants to city district courthouses for in-person bail reviews. As another alternative, the public defender's office has asked the judge to release all defendants on their own recognizance.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Age obviously makes no difference in the age-old ritual of dating.After all, Bill Guba, 88, beat out two younger men -- one 78, the other 82 -- for the attention of Ethel Gesswein, 73, in a parody of "The Dating Game" television show that will air tomorrow at the Oak Crest Village retirement center.The winning snare?When asked which movie star he thought the hidden-behind-a-screen Gesswein would resemble, he answered long-ago star Zasu Pitts, and a match was made -- on television, at least.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Age obviously makes no difference in the age-old ritual of dating.After all, Bill Guba, 88, beat out two younger men -- one 78, the other 82 -- for the attention of Ethel Gesswein, 73, in a parody of "The Dating Game" television show that will air tomorrow at the Oak Crest Village retirement center.The winning snare?When asked which movie star he thought the hidden-behind-a-screen Gesswein would resemble, he answered long-ago star Zasu Pitts, and a match was made -- on television, at least.
NEWS
January 27, 1992
The Naval Academy Satellite Earth Station is transmitting live television from space and from the Kennedy Space Center during the currentmission of the space shuttle Discovery.The coverage is on the academy's closed circuit television system, but Annapolitans who live within a few miles of the academy may be able to pick up the broadcastwith an outside antenna. Tune in below channel 14 on the UHF band, or use the antenna with cable channel 58.The Naval Academy Radio Club is transmitting the signal using a low-power amateur TV transmitter and the call sign W3ADO.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 8, 1991
A dramatic surge in child abuse during the past decade has prompted two state lawmakers to offer legislation protecting foster children, outlawing possession of child pornography, helping drug-addicted babies and aiding criminal prosecutors.Child abuse reports more thandoubled in Maryland, from 5,330 in 1980 to 13,507 last year, according to the state Department of Human Resources. Reported cases in AnneArundel rose from 421 in 1980 to 814 in 1990.Yesterday, Sens. Thomas M. Yeager, D-Howard County, and Gerald W.Winegrad, D-Annapolis, unveiled a half-dozen bills proposed by the Governor's Council on Child Abuse to stem the tide.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A Maryland Court of Appeals ruling has turned the state's law allowing closed-circuit television testimony into a way to further traumatize young sex abuse victims, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. told a Senate committee yesterday.The April 1991 ruling seems to indicate that a child must first break down in front of a defendant before a judge can allow TV testimony, Mr. Curran said.However, a bill before the General Assembly (SB 333) would give judges power to authorize TV testimony after interviewing the child privately, or on the basis of testimony from parents and psychiatrists.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
A Howard County District Court judge denied bail for a 48-year-old Upper Marlboro truck driver who is charged with killing his estranged wife in his car on Interstate 95 Thursday afternoon.Robert Lee Hampton of the 3400 block of Halloway Drive was arrested and charged with first-degree murder and use of a handgun in the commission of a crime in the shooting of Janet Lorraine Hampton, 46, of the 200 block of N. Fairmont St., Baltimore, state police said.State police said a trooper found the woman slumped inside Mr. Hampton's Burgundy 1983 Jaguar with a gunshot wound to her neck.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
An East Baltimore bar owner fatally shot a 20-year-old man robbing the Highlandtown establishment at gunpoint, police said yesterday. Jamual Brown of the 1700 block of Homestead St. died about 12:15 a.m. yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Police said they do not plan to file charges against the bar owner, Junior Thompson, 51. The incident began about 11:40 p.m. Wednesday, when a gunman forced his way into the J&M Corner Bar in the 3500 block of E. Baltimore St., police said. The robber ordered the bar's patrons and staff to the floor and took an undisclosed amount of cash from the bar's register, police said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
The People's Court it's not.But then the new closed-circuit television system the county started using for bond hearings last week was never meant to be entertaining. It was designed for security. Defendants remain at the detention center while a judge in District Court decides what bond, if any, to impose.From the bench, the judge uses a video-game style keyboard. Miniature digital cameras take pictures of the defendant, the defendant's attorney and the judge.The cameras, which look like two small speakers on top of a 26-inch TV set, focus automatically, use normal lighting and need no special acoustical equipment.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
I was standing in line in a store recently when I heard this phrase over and over again on a closed circuit television, "Get more Easter for your dollar. " It struck me that this national chain apparently knows nothing of what Easter is. Easter is not for sale in any store. Easter is not a commodity that one buys. Easter is not something that one brings home in a shopping bag. Easter is the celebration of that glorious day when the Lord Jesus Christ rose from the grave and left His tomb empty to show His power over sin, death, Satan and the grave.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | April 5, 1991
The battle is about to begin between Daily Racing Form and its new competitor, Racing Times.Racing Times will begin publishing a past-performance paper April 13. The publication will be sold in major markets, including Maryland, before expanding its availability throughout the country.Racing Times is owned by Robert Maxwell, publishing adversary to Rupert Murdoch, who owns the Form. The pair already has a past-performance war going in England, where Murdoch started Racing Post as a challenger to Maxwell's long-established Sporting Life.
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