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By David Zurawik | May 26, 2002
The relationship between television and national memory almost always makes for fascinating holiday viewing. But rarely is the history remembered on screen as heartbreakingly close to home for those in the audience as "In Memoriam: New York City, 9/11/01" (HBO, 9 p.m.) - a record of that horrible day as seen through the eyes of former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and more than 100 of the citizens and workers of that city who bore witness. A body of great film and television documentary is already growing up around the terrorist attacks and our responses in the minutes, hours and days immediately after.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Wayne and Wende Allen found a second home, their vacation escape, in a convenient location - 24 miles from their Harford County home. "Most of our friends who have second homes have them at the beach, in the mountains down south," said Wende Allen, a 46-year-old physician's assistant at a fertility clinic in Bel Air. "That's where you typically think your vacation home should be, hours away. But we have found our paradise retreat in our same county, our same comfortable community; yet it feels like we've escaped.
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NEWS
December 3, 1992
Ovarian cancer is called one of the silent killers. The disease typically progresses without symptoms, and treatment often comes too late. An estimated 21,000 women will be diagnosed with it this year alone. About 13,000 will die.Still, those numbers are inadequate to measure the tragedy involved when the disease hits close to home, as it did recently in Howard County.The recent death of Diane Zdenek is a sad testament to the toll cancer of the ovaries can take. Because Mrs. Zdenek was a teacher.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Maryland's coastal zones are the lifeblood of our state and especially vulnerable to sea level. That's why the terrifying news of the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet melt hits particularly close to home ( "Historic sites face climate threats ," May 19). Scientists have referred to the West Antarctic ice collapse as a "tipping point" in global climate change. This collapse is not only irreversible but could have a domino effect on the entire ice sheet, raising sea level by three times what has already melted.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
One of the most intimidating high school softball pitchers in Anne Arundel County history, Crystal Ray, has chosen to attend the University of Maryland-Baltimore County on a full scholarship."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- The West Regional included several contestants who have felt at home in Southern California.Utah guard Andre Miller is from Compton, and his mother is delighted that the regional was close to home. Two years ago, she rode a bus from Los Angeles to Dallas to see Utah play a regional game.Mike Mardesich, the Terps' 7-foot freshman center, was born in Long Beach, and lived there until he was 6. Miles Simon, the Wildcats' first-team All-America guard, grew up in nearby Fullerton.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | November 1, 1991
He lived in a small Indiana town barely a half-hour's drive from Notre Dame, but Rick Mirer grew up dreaming of playing college football across the border, where he could wear the blue and gold of the Michigan Wolverines."
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Seven-year-old Damesha Davis handed off her freshly finished math homework to Dare Johnson for his approval and pulled out the next set of problems from her aqua school folder.Johnson, a Morgan State University sophomore, looked over the math problems while Damesha scribbled sentences on a piece of paper.For another hour, Damesha and Johnson, 21, a computer science major, worked through the homework in a new after-school program at the Pleasant View Gardens Boys and Girls Club. The tutoring program, run by the Baltimore Urban Systemic Initiative (BUSI)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2002
RICHMOND, Va. - It took just a day for this city to become fully initiated in the rituals of the sniper story. The Virginia capital, after thinking itself a world away from the shootings that have terrorized the Washington area, now shows the same signs of fear that have dominated the nation's capital for weeks. After police seized two men just outside Richmond, and as the latest victim of the sniper lay in hospital bed after a weekend attack just north of the city, the worries settled in here.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
Towson University sophomore Holly Noga thought about how nice it would be to play soccer at a big sports school like Tennessee. Also down south, UNC-Wilmington kept calling. But when it came time to decide where the former Severna Park standout would be spending her next four years, it became more and more clear to her that she was meant to be a Tiger. "They had my major, I liked the coaches, and on my visit, I felt real comfortable with the team," said Noga, a two-time Anne Arundel County Player of the Year.
SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
When his son Owen was diagnosed with autism at 18 months, Pat Skerry did not believe it. "I thought it was way too early," the Towson men's basketball coach recalled. "It could have been other things. I was not really accepting of it. " His wife, Kristen, knew otherwise. "She is the one who moved the chains on it," Skerry said. "She was really good about things, saying, 'What are we going to do next? How are we going to attack this?' She has been a superstar with it. " Now, almost four years later, Owen is increasingly more communicative and his father has grown a movement to raise awareness and funds for a once-unfamiliar cause.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
As I stood in The Mall in Columbia parking lot throughout the day and night Saturday, I received a few questions on Twitter about why I, a sports reporter who covers the Orioles for The Baltimore Sun, was there reporting on the shooting. So, before you continue to read, know that this blog isn't about the Orioles or what they've done or haven't done this offseason. But it is to answer that first question in much more than 140 characters. To me, it was a little personal. When violence occurs locally, we are often cliché in saying that it happens too close to home.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
James Hopkins has faced many obstacles in his life. The most recent sequence included a boating accident in 1992 that resulted in a broken back and other lingering injuries. The 45-year-old earned a certificate in computer-aided design from Anne Arundel Community College but was laid off a few years ago. And he recently saw his mortgage soar to $2,200 a month and narrowly avoided foreclosure. Yet it was only recently that the 1986 Annapolis High School graduate decided to seek help - he needed repairs on the Annapolis home where he's lived in since 1990.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 23, 2012
For some of us, the pain of the dual tragedies of Yeardley Love and George Huguely is intensified by the fact that both children are so familiar to us. Raise your hand if you have spent any part of your child's life caught in the lacrosse whirlwind that sweeps through Maryland each spring. And summer. And fall ball. And the winter indoor league. It is something that ordinary civilians might not comprehend (though ballet parents or horse show parents might sympathize). Lacrosse can be a toxic mix of parental ambition and peer pressure.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2011
Jimmy Patsos was in his first season at Loyola when Pat Kennedy, then entering his second year at Towson and coming off a 5-24 season, proclaimed the Tigers to be Baltimore's college basketball team. Other local coaches might have chuckled at Kennedy's remark, but Patsos, raised near the chips on the shoulders of Gary Williams, took it as a personal challenge. "The last I looked," Patsos said at the time, " we're in Baltimore. " But deep down, Patsos knew that Loyola could have been on Mars when it came to Baltimore players.
EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
High school graduates still "go away to college," but, more and more, "away" means not that far. For the grinning seniors proudly wearing their caps and gowns this graduation season, along with their beaming parents, these difficult economic times require the most bang from the college tuition buck. For many, that will mean a community college instead of a four-year college or an in-state institution rather than one out of state. The community college option has recently exploded in popularity.
NEWS
By Patrick Kerkstra and Patrick Kerkstra,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 5, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Sooner or later - preferably later - Robert Forrest and his wife, Patricia DePol, will move from their three-bedroom split-level to the mausoleum in the backyard. The size of a toolshed and built of pink Vermont granite, with horizontal accommodations for four, the tomb is conveniently located just a few hundred feet from the cedar deck off the living room of their Blairstown, N.J., home. "We see bear cubs play. A peacock visits sometimes," said Forrest, 61, a retired restaurateur.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2000
SHARPSBURG - One hundred and thirty-three years ago, almost 5,000 Union soldiers were buried in what is now Antietam National Cemetery on the battlefield where they fell, most of them far from their homes. Yesterday, a sailor who died far from his home was laid to rest in this cemetery a few miles from where he grew up. Patrick Howard Roy was buried a week after Seaman Apprentice Craig B. Wibberley of nearby Williamsport was laid to rest, and a day after the funeral for Engine Fireman Joshua L. Parlett of Churchville.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
We all had hope of the return of Phylicia Barnes ("Teen's family is left with a heartbreaking puzzle," April 25). No parent or family wants to hear about the disappearance of a family member let alone discover he or she has been killed. As a mother, I can feel the pain of Phylicia's mom and my heart goes out to her. After reading articles of her disappearance, I know she was well-loved by all who knew her. As time goes by perhaps the pain of losing her will heal, but for those who were closest to her, her memories will live on. May she rest in peace.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2010
S o overwhelmed was Nadege Marc after viewing news coverage of the earthquake in Haiti that she couldn't even begin to face the prospect of seeing firsthand what she calls "the circle of death." A shadow fell over Marc's face as she described watching footage of the blanket-covered heaps of corpses on sidewalks and the mass graves of unidentified bodies. Yet the Veterans Elementary School teacher, who organized a fundraiser among students and staff, said she expects to summon the courage to head to the Caribbean country in the not-too-distant future.
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