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NEWS
By LYNDA CASE LAMBERT | July 15, 1994
Why does government always miss the point?It has always bothered me, for instance, that the Brown v. the Board of Education decision prompted 25 years of busing, when the reason Mrs. Brown brought the suit was her desire for her child to attend the school near their home . . . in the neighborhood . . . nearby . . . in walking distance!There are millions of examples of this kind of foolishness. You can pick any government level, any legislative year. But right here, right now, we have a beautiful local example: The spending of $19 million to move the Cloisters Children's Museum from Falls Road to downtown.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 24, 2010
My late mother had many tricks up her sleeve on Christmas Day, but none made her happier than the distribution of a couple of dozen gifts to an order of cloistered nuns who were forbidden to receive any item construed as luxury, fancy or special. She dealt with a present-giving household of 12 and an even larger network of cousins and friends. She didn't drive and often hand-carried her Christmas items home on the No. 8 streetcar. She loved to give; it was her joy. And to give meant tailoring the present to what would delight the recipient.
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NEWS
April 17, 1992
If the Cloisters Children's Museum were to set up new exhibits for its young visitors to reflect the state of cultural support by the suburbs, it might include:* A toy cash register -- with no toy money.* A "sharing center," only that the county children get to share the city tots' toys, and not vice versa.* A "building block corner," where city kids could ask permission to erect little towers -- and county kids could deny them.That might educate kids about the abysmal level of support for Baltimore museums by county governments.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
Colonial Players opens its 61st season with John Patrick's "The Curious Savage," a 60-year-old comedy rarely staged locally. This gentle comedy is given life by a new CP director and several debuting actors, who get the season off to a pleasant start. Patrick, a post-World War II author, won a Pulitzer and a Tony for his 1953 stage adaptation of "Teahouse of the August Moon" and later enjoyed success as a screenwriter. His "Savage" asks whether the so-called sane people of the outside world are as wise as the eccentric folks inside a sanitarium.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
Although a final decision won't come until the frost is on the pumpkin, Baltimore City appears to have no chance of getting the commercial re-zoning it covets near the Cloisters Children's Museum. Because the museum is located in Baltimore County, the city must come hat in hand -- a familiar posture -- seeking the zoning change.City representatives say the land-use change would allow development of a small office park to provide a more steady revenue source for the museum. County planners and community groups, fearful of anything that could open the Greenspring Valley to development, are especially suspicious of the city request because it lacks details.
FEATURES
September 20, 1990
The Cloisters Children's Museum is extending its Saturday hours.Beginning in October, the museum will open at 10 a.m. rather than noon to better serve young families, says Susie Breaux, museum spokeswoman. The museum will close at 4 p.m., as usual.During the new Saturday morning hours, the museum will offer free play sessions and workshops, as well as the on-going exhibitions.The museum is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. It is at 10440 Falls Road, just outside the Beltway.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | December 26, 1992
The future of the Cloisters property in Baltimore County remained unclear yesterday, after a decision to move the children's museum there to downtown Baltimore.Dudrea W. Parker, who died in 1972, willed the residence and roughly 50 acres of land to a private foundation. The will stipulated that the Dudrea and Sumner Parker Foundation would function as a nonprofit group "for the primary purpose of preserving in perpetuity 'The Cloisters' for public use."Another part of the will stipulated that if the private foundation was unable to fulfill its role, they were to give The Cloisters property to the state, the City or the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
Crouched inside the child-sized "doctor's office" at theCloisters Children's Museum yesterday, Pikesville resident Ann Muhvich appeared to be the perfect patient for her daughters Emma, 21 months, and Katie, nearly 5.But after dressing the budding physicians in miniature doctor's smocks, and scrunching down on the tiny patient's couch for an examination, she turned out to have a complaint for which there is no cure.Ms. Muhvich was unhappy about the museum's recent decision to close the castle-shaped building permanently on Labor Day so its staff can devote its attention to planning a larger museum near the Inner Harbor by late 1996.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
Sumner and Dudrea Parker traveled the world for years after they were married in 1905, collecting antiques, paintings, rugs and other artifacts. Then they had to build a place to house their treasures.The result was the Cloisters, a 30-room mansion on 53 wooded acres in Brooklandville. This week, the last dusty remnants of their magnificent collection were sold.Members of the Symphony Associates, who sponsored the Decorator Show House at the Cloisters this spring, were cleaning up the mansion Thursday after the show's closing as auctioneer Richard Opfer was knocking down the remaining 250 pieces of the collection to a full house at his auction place on Greenspring Drive.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
After 17 years of operation, the Cloisters Children's Museum in Baltimore County will close permanently on Sept. 4 so its staff and board members can focus on opening a new children's museum near Baltimore's Inner Harbor.After the Cloisters closes, the museum staff plans to stage events and outreach programs around the region to remain visible and help generate excitement for the much larger museum planned to anchor a $30 million National Children's Center at 34 Market Place.Board members decided they would make more progress on the downtown project -- and could even speed up the construction timetable by as much as a year -- if they weren't simultaneously operating the old facility, said newly elected Chairman Douglas L. Becker.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | December 4, 2006
FREDERICK --Since its founding in 1868, the Maryland School for the Deaf has been cloistered from the wider world. Students walk a picturesque campus of green lawns and old brick buildings, speak American Sign Language and enjoy their own culture. . Now the school is considering a radical step that could end that segregation: a proposal to accept a limited number of hearing students. The school's superintendent says it should think about admitting hearing students to ensure that enrollment in years to come will remain large enough to be viable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | June 30, 2005
PICK OF THE WEEK What: "Midsummer Nights: Theater at the Cloisters." When: 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Wednesdays through July Where: The Cloisters amphitheater, 10440 Falls Road, Lutherville. Why: Because you can pack a picnic, dine under the stars and watch a live Shakespearean performance by the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival. On Wednesday, the players present Mondo Shakespeare Jr. On July 13: Are Fairy Tales Grimm? On July 20: Midsummer Night's Dream. And on July 27: Clowning Around With Shakespeare.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Sandy Stellmann moved to a 4,800-square-foot Georgian-style home in Baltimore County five years ago, even though many people her age are scaling back when it comes to housing. "I grew up in a large house," the 61-year-old says, referring to her former Roland Park home. "I love different rooms to go in and out of, and I wanted a place for all of my furniture." Twice widowed and with grown children in homes of their own, Stellmann settled at the Cloisters at Charles, a condominium community off Charles Street, blocks from the city line.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | April 22, 2002
When directors of Baltimore's Office of Promotion & The Arts sent out invitations to a recent wine-tasting party and silent auction at The Cloisters estate in Baltimore County -- a benefit for the city's annual Artscape festival -- they got an angry response from one invitee. How dare a city agency hold an event in Baltimore County? Couldn't the fund-raisers find any suitable locations on city property, the anonymous correspondent demanded to know What the writer apparently didn't realize is that The Cloisters is city property -- a bequest to Baltimore from original owners Sumner and Dudrea Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and By Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | February 3, 2002
Margo Lauterbach and Davis Farvolden had two weddings. Last Feb. 19, with two acquaintances as witnesses, they exchanged vows in the front yard of their home in Australia, where they lived while attending medical school. The weather was hot, the bride wore blue and they celebrated afterward with dinner at a seaside restaurant. Exactly 11 months later, at the Cloisters in Brooklandville, they said the same vows in front of 100 guests. A layer of snow covered everything outside, and they followed the ceremony with dinner, dancing and a tower of cupcakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 29, 2001
Visit the Cloisters -- taste the world. At least, so it seemed at the third annual Wine Arts Tasting benefiting Artscape. Each room in the medieval building featured food from a different country, with wines to match. And then there were the tourists -- 330 of them taking the trip, finding plenty of friends along the way. Friends like: Franklin McNeil Jr., Mark Kochevar and City Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh, event co- chairs; Claudia Bismark, Wanda Q. Draper, Rachel Eisler, Bill Fine, Dana Karangelen, Kathryn Norris, Barbara Redmond, Serge Reveille and Clair Zamoiski and Tommy Segal, event committee members; John Galleazzi, University of Maryland School of Medicine assistant dean; Pamela Johnson, Baltimore schools development director; Avis Naomi Smith, Baltimore International College student; Dr. Adam Basner, Sinai Hospital plastic surgery division head; Dana Durrett, Apex Drapery interior designer; Bob Groth, Flying Fruit Fantasy founder; Rhea Feikin, Baltimore actress; Jean Wyman, Good Thinking Inc. president; Almie McIntyre Jr., McIntyre Financial Group president; Joe Werner, Towson Interpark president; Chuck Nabit, Southport Financial CEO; and Bradley Alston, YMCA of Central Maryland project director.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
For years it was the private residence of Sumner and Dudrea Parker, wealthy socialites known for their lavish parties and extensive art collection.In 1977 it began a 17-year stint as a children's museum, eventually drawing more than 50,000 visitors a year before it closed in September.Next spring it will reopen briefly as the Baltimore Symphony Associates' 19th annual Decorator Show House, and the exposure may help determine the next use.The Cloisters, a fortress of a building also known as "the Castle on the Hill," will be made over starting in late February for the month-long event, a fund-raiser for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
A joint venture of Loyola Federal Savings Bank and Williamsburg Builders of Columbia has begun marketing residences at The Cloisters at Charles, a luxury town house development at Charles Street and Bellona Avenue.The group will unveil models during a preview Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at 6409 Cloisters Gate Drive.A Loyola subsidiary, FSB Development Inc., took control of the 10-acre parcel last year after Loyola initiated foreclosure proceedings against the original developer, Faust Homes.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2001
Chateau Builders has a model open and 36 condominiums available at the Cloisters at Village Greens community in Howard County. The golf course community in Marriottsville offers six plans, ranging from 1,350 square feet to 1,900 square feet and priced from $206,490 to $255,490. The homes front the eighth fairway of the Waverly Woods Golf Course. Standard interior features include screened porches, 9-foot ceilings, luxury baths and upgraded trim and lighting packages. The condominiums come with natural gas heat and hot water.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2000
With its current production of John Patrick's "The Curious Savage," Paragon Theatre is offering food for thought at its Trifles Restaurant location in Crownsville. Patrick's protagonist in the character-driven dark comedy is wealthy widow Ethel Savage, who has been placed in an asylum known as the Cloisters by three greedy stepchildren eager to get their hands on a $10 million inheritance. Ethel gleefully manipulates these despicable characters as she lends encouragement to the gentle eccentrics living at the asylum, and goes about convincing the Cloisters staff of her mental health.
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