Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClockwork Orange
IN THE NEWS

Clockwork Orange

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 29, 2008
MAX RAAB, 81 Film producer, clothes maker Max Raab, a trend-setting clothes manufacturer and executive producer of A Clockwork Orange, has died. He had struggled with Parkinson's disease. Philadelphia Funeral home Joseph Levine & Sons confirmed Mr. Raab's Feb. 21 death. Mr. Raab, a Philadelphia native, invented the shirt-dress, owned Villager clothes and produced several films, including Walkabout in 1970. Mr. Raab later became interested in movies. He bought the rights to Anthony Burgess' book A Clockwork Orange and sold them to Stanley Kubrick, who directed the film.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 29, 2008
MAX RAAB, 81 Film producer, clothes maker Max Raab, a trend-setting clothes manufacturer and executive producer of A Clockwork Orange, has died. He had struggled with Parkinson's disease. Philadelphia Funeral home Joseph Levine & Sons confirmed Mr. Raab's Feb. 21 death. Mr. Raab, a Philadelphia native, invented the shirt-dress, owned Villager clothes and produced several films, including Walkabout in 1970. Mr. Raab later became interested in movies. He bought the rights to Anthony Burgess' book A Clockwork Orange and sold them to Stanley Kubrick, who directed the film.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Scott Higham and Jay Apperson and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | December 17, 1995
"I was a wandering sheep. I did not love the fold. I did not love my shepherd's voice. I would not be controlled." -- Alex, the central character in the violent film "A Clockwork Orange."For Benjamin Scott Garris, playing Alex was the role of a lifetime.He tried to commit suicide, just like Alex.He was treated in a psychiatric hospital, just like Alex.He even dressed in costume, wearing black Doc Martens boots and a jock strap pulled tightly over his white pants. Just like Alex.And when the teen allegedly knifed a counselor to death at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Towson in October, police said he seemed to be mimicking the "ultra violence" he found so fascinating in "A Clockwork Orange," a futuristic film about a sadistic droog "rehabilitated" by government psychiatrists.
FEATURES
By Sean Patrick Norris and Sean Patrick Norris,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
In the original Halloween, Donald Pleasence played the antihero Dr. Loomis as an eccentric, but one who ultimately proves himself good, rescuing hunted baby sitter Laurie Strode from a psychopathic Michael Myers. Leave it to bloodthirsty director Rob Zombie and actor Malcolm McDowell who specializes in villainous characters to craft the ambitious doctor as much less of a white knight in the "reimagined" Halloween, opening today. "It's a very different storyline. We are reinventing the characters," says McDowell, who appeared this month at Horrorfind Weekend at the Hunt Valley Marriott.
NEWS
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 8, 1999
Stanley Kubrick, whose dark vision of human nature seemed to suffuse each of his movies, died yesterday at his home outside London. He was 70. The cause of death was not released.Kubrick was that rare director who left an imprint on every work, regardless of the genre. "The Killing" (1956), a taut crime drama starring Sterling Hayden, was a classic, gritty film noir; "Paths of Glory" (1957) was an elegantly filmed indictment of the hypocrisy of the military in World War I; "Lolita" (1962)
NEWS
By Jonathan R. Cohen and Jonathan R. Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
"Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," by Vincent LoBrutto. Donald L. Fine Books.640 pages. $29.95.The world's appetite for American sportswear, records and films is growing. Each year it seems whole forests are sacrificed to print books about the stars at the center of our expanding entertainment universe. Yet few if any of these works provide an understanding of why today's American popular culture is as influential as the automobile or the electric light. Unfortunately, with "Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," Vincent LoBrutto, the author of a number of books on film and a professional film editor, has forfeited an excellent opportunity to break the trend.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 8, 1993
Two decades ago, director Stanley Kubrick and Warner Bros. abruptly withdrew Mr. Kubrick's "Clockwork Orange" from theaters across Britain, an unusual act of self-censorship amid public protests that the movie had stirred a wave of violence.Last week a London court was asked to affirm the 19-year-old distribution ban on the film by punishing the manager of a London movie house who is accused of showing a bootleg copy to an audience last April.In arguments in a London courtroom, lawyers for an organization called the Federation Against Copyright Theft said that the program manager of the Scala cinema had knowingly and illegally screened the film without first obtaining permission from Time Warner, which holds the copyright.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
FEATURES
May 5, 2006
THE QUESTION A dysfunctional group hops in a vehicle and heads off across America, with wacky comedy in hot pursuit. Where have we heard that before? Oh, wait ... Johnson Family Vacation. Oh, and Flirting with Disaster, and Lost in America, and National Lampoon's Vacation. Oh, and ... you get the idea. Anyway, Robin Williams is the latest to take his turn behind the wheel in the new RV. It makes us wonder, what do you consider the greatest "road trip" comedy? WHAT YOU SAY The best road movie in my mind is Midnight Run [1988]
FEATURES
By Sean Patrick Norris and Sean Patrick Norris,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
In the original Halloween, Donald Pleasence played the antihero Dr. Loomis as an eccentric, but one who ultimately proves himself good, rescuing hunted baby sitter Laurie Strode from a psychopathic Michael Myers. Leave it to bloodthirsty director Rob Zombie and actor Malcolm McDowell who specializes in villainous characters to craft the ambitious doctor as much less of a white knight in the "reimagined" Halloween, opening today. "It's a very different storyline. We are reinventing the characters," says McDowell, who appeared this month at Horrorfind Weekend at the Hunt Valley Marriott.
FEATURES
May 5, 2006
THE QUESTION A dysfunctional group hops in a vehicle and heads off across America, with wacky comedy in hot pursuit. Where have we heard that before? Oh, wait ... Johnson Family Vacation. Oh, and Flirting with Disaster, and Lost in America, and National Lampoon's Vacation. Oh, and ... you get the idea. Anyway, Robin Williams is the latest to take his turn behind the wheel in the new RV. It makes us wonder, what do you consider the greatest "road trip" comedy? WHAT YOU SAY The best road movie in my mind is Midnight Run [1988]
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2005
LONDON - Watch out for "happy slapping," the latest youth craze to sweep Britain. It's not a new dance step or even a new designer drug. It's a criminal assault. Groups of teenagers approach an unsuspecting person and begin punching and kicking him or her while capturing it all on their mobile phone cameras. The images are later uploaded and shared on the Internet. The victims can be young or old, male or female. Bus stops, subway stations and parks are considered prime venues. In most cases, the injuries are minor.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2002
PISCATAWAY, N.J. -- With six titles in the past decade, Princeton has placed its stamp on the final weekend of the NCAA men's lacrosse tournament. With 20 straight appearances in the final four, it has also been great for Syracuse, but is it bad for the rest of college lacrosse that the weekend has become a two-headed monster? "Absolutely not," Princeton coach Bill Tierney said. "What's great for lacrosse is what happened this year. You've got the automatic-qualifier thing. You've got teams with the opportunity to shoot for this goal.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
COLLEGE PARK - Johns Hopkins coach John Haus sank into a crouch and stared at the soggy Byrd Stadium turf, as the final seconds of Johns Hopkins' season ticked off the game clock. The Blue Jays, so close to their first NCAA lacrosse championship game since 1989, had pulled even with Syracuse and had missed a chance to take a late lead that might have finished the Orangemen. But Syracuse, showing the pedigree of a program that lives for Final Four challenges, overcame penalty problems, sloppy conditions and a stubborn Hopkins team that trailed nearly all day, before supplying two back-breakers in front of 24,105.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday, and Chris Kaltenabch and Ann Hornaday, and Chris Kaltenabch,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
The second edition of the Maryland Film Festival will unspool next weekend, with more than 100 short and feature films shown at the Senator and Charles theaters. And as with every festival, one question, for good or for ill, will be on every filmgoer's lips: Where do they find this stuff? Part of the answer is simple. Festival founder Jed Dietz and program adviser, Gabe Wardell are both veteran film festivalgoers, who travel from Toronto to Park City in search of works to share with audiences back home.
NEWS
By ELAINE TASSY and ELAINE TASSY,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
Benjamin Scott Garris, 16, yesterday was sentenced to life without parole for the October murder of a Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital counselor -- whose life was squashed as though she were "no more than an ant," a judge said.In a crime that carried overtones of "A Clockwork Orange," prosecutors asked for, and received, the toughest punishment available under Maryland law -- capital punishment is not an option for a defendant younger than 18."I'm glad he got what he did; he deserved that," said the victim's mother, Esther Mae Edwards.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2005
LONDON - Watch out for "happy slapping," the latest youth craze to sweep Britain. It's not a new dance step or even a new designer drug. It's a criminal assault. Groups of teenagers approach an unsuspecting person and begin punching and kicking him or her while capturing it all on their mobile phone cameras. The images are later uploaded and shared on the Internet. The victims can be young or old, male or female. Bus stops, subway stations and parks are considered prime venues. In most cases, the injuries are minor.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1999
One week it's a Sunday in Havana. The next it's a Monday in Camden Yards. Both places involve clearing customs.Mike Mussina taking the mound. Cal Ripken jumping the foul line on his way to third base. Ernie Tyler running out fresh pelotas to the plate ump. A remembrance of those both missing and present. Even within a black-and-orange universe left spinning since last September, these are constants that help separate Our Towne from the rest of baseball. Thirteen players, ranging from fresh-faced second baseman Jesse Garcia to hit man Albert Belle, today swig their first taste of Opening Day in Orioles whites.
NEWS
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 8, 1999
Stanley Kubrick, whose dark vision of human nature seemed to suffuse each of his movies, died yesterday at his home outside London. He was 70. The cause of death was not released.Kubrick was that rare director who left an imprint on every work, regardless of the genre. "The Killing" (1956), a taut crime drama starring Sterling Hayden, was a classic, gritty film noir; "Paths of Glory" (1957) was an elegantly filmed indictment of the hypocrisy of the military in World War I; "Lolita" (1962)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.