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By Brian E. Crowley and Brian E. Crowley,Cox News Service | June 14, 1992
CLOCKERS.Richard Price.Houghton Mifflin.599 pages; $22.95. Strike Durham is a cocaine dealer. Not the flashy, witty drug dealer of "Miami Vice" -- Strike leads a crew of teen-age, $10-bottle sellers in the New Jersey projects across the river from Manhattan.At 19, Strike is a veteran of the streets. His tough-guy image keeps him alive. His bleeding ulcer is the result of turmoil, conflict and fear. Strike, it turns out, is more than just a dope-dealing thug. In many ways, despite the scars, he is still just a struggling kid who often wonders if there is a way out."
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FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Not since Graham Greene has a critically acclaimed novelist been as closely linked to the big screen as Richard Price. His screenwriting credits include Martin Scorsese's The Color of Money (1986) and the Al Pacino-Ellen Barkin thriller, Sea of Love (1989). The movie version of his 1998 novel Freedomland opens today, starring Julianne Moore and Samuel L. Jackson. Price penned the script. He's still best known for his first book, The Wanderers (1974), a series of linked stories about Bronx teen gangs that Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff)
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 13, 1995
At least in "Clockers," you always know what time it is: It's midnight in the American City and the American spirit."Clockers," derived from Richard Price's novel via a script by Price and director Spike Lee, is a two-hour reality check that begins with the phoniest trick in the book. It's about the cop who doesn't believe a confessed killer, the starting point for a thousand undistinguished novels and movies.The cop who doesn't buy it, in this case, is one Rocco Klein (the great Harvey Keitel)
NEWS
December 11, 2005
On Thursday, December 8, 2005, MARIA E. CLOCKER; the beloved wife of Ronald A. Clocker; mother of Ronald A. Clocker, Jr. and Tina M. Towns; sister of Gerardo and Dennis Perez, also survived by five grandchildren. Friends may call at the GEORGE P. KALAS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 2973 Solomons Island Road., Edgewater, MD on Monday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. where services will be held on Tuesday, December 13 at 12:00 P.M. Interment Lake View Memorial Park, Sykesville, MD.
FEATURES
By Beth Pinsker and Beth Pinsker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 1, 1995
When Delroy Lindo gets mad on screen, people stop in their tracks.Maybe it's his voice. When he played a father in Spike Lee's 1994 drama "Crooklyn," one boom from his deep baritone would make his kids cower.Or maybe it's because he's 6-foot-2, and when he leans forward, narrows his eyes and furrows his already creased brow -- as he does often in Lee's adaptation of Richard Price's "Clockers" -- you know he means business.Whatever the aura, it commands attention -- even more as the Oscar buzz builds around his portrayal of Rodney Little, "Clockers' " searing drug lord, who attracts legions of young boys into his service with his fatherly presence but is a cold businessman at heart.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | September 25, 1995
I left Spike Lee's ''Clockers'' thinking every child 12 years old and up should see it. They should see it to get a glimpse of how they will look when they are dead.Mr. Lee, after years of being criticized by many reviewers for not having enough about drugs in his cinematic versions of African-Americans, makes a two-bit seller, or ''clocker'' the central character. He opens the movie with close-up photos taken by police of blown away men and women, presumably killed in drug-related disputes.
SPORTS
By MARTY McGEE | September 15, 1991
Clocking horses during morning workouts has become a complicated racing issue. The betting public demands integrity and accuracy in the reporting of works, but the obstacles for clockers -- and the cost efficiency for their employers -- are real problems."
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Not since Graham Greene has a critically acclaimed novelist been as closely linked to the big screen as Richard Price. His screenwriting credits include Martin Scorsese's The Color of Money (1986) and the Al Pacino-Ellen Barkin thriller, Sea of Love (1989). The movie version of his 1998 novel Freedomland opens today, starring Julianne Moore and Samuel L. Jackson. Price penned the script. He's still best known for his first book, The Wanderers (1974), a series of linked stories about Bronx teen gangs that Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff)
NEWS
By Michiko Kakutani and Michiko Kakutani,The New York Times | May 7, 1995
"The Information," by Martin Amis. New York: Harmony Books. 374 pages. $24Once in a while in some artists' careers, there comes along a work that sums up all their preoccupations, all their technical innovations to date.By turns satirical and tender, funny and disturbing, "The Information" marks a giant leap forward in Amis' career. Here, in a tale of middle-aged angst and literary desperation, all the themes and stylistic experiments of Amis's earlier fiction come together in a symphonic whole.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 22, 1995
IF YOU WANT to see some intelligent discussion of violence in the cities these days, you must go, of course, to a movie.What'd you think -- C-Span?You watch C-Span if you're into, say, speeches by old white guys about hip hop music, which they wouldn't know from the Lindy hop.You go to the movies if you want popcorn, a drink, Junior Mints and cold, hard reality. Yeah, reality -- courtesy of Hollywood, the dream factory, home to Sly Stallone and Ah-nuld, and also Bob Dole's old stomping grounds.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 9, 2004
Mike Sabo is waiting for his heart to arrive. It is due any minute from Los Angeles. Just before lunch, an assistant hands him a small brown box. Sabo slashes through the packing tape and reverently unwraps the organ. It's a beaut: crimson with purple overtones, made of gelatin, and, on this sweltering day, cool and faintly moist to the touch. Sabo studies the heart with satisfaction. It will play a starring role in the autopsy scene of the HBO television show The Wire, which is scheduled to be shot later this May afternoon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
John LeVernier Cothorn, a retired high school principal who had a long sideline career as Johnny the Clocker at Maryland thoroughbred racetracks, died Sunday in his sleep in his Pikesville home. He was 89. For many years, he appeared at dawn at Pimlico and Laurel in Maryland and at Monmouth Park in New Jersey. With a stopwatch in hand, he timed horses' morning workouts for the Daily Racing Form, the national newspaper that covers the racing scene. Later in the day, he took his place in the principal's office at Carrollton Vocational School, and later at Cherry Hill Junior High School.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even if it were not a thoroughly upsetting two hours, the movie "187" would face rough sledding at the box office because it is not about a dinosaur that hijacks Air Force One.It is a movie for what moviemakers evidently consider a minor market niche -- grown-ups. It is about the foreign country composed of young people, especially young men, in America's wilder urban neighborhoods.The protagonist is Trevor Garfield, a doomed ambassador to that country. He is an African-American high school teacher who, in the movie's first harrowing moments, set in Brooklyn, is repeatedly stabbed in the back by a student wielding a tenpenny nail affixed to a wooden shank.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
HALLANDALE, Fla. - Shortly before 7: 30 a.m. yesterday, Cigar passed his final test before leaving for the Middle East and the $4 million Dubai World Cup on March 27 in the United Arab Emirates.The Maryland-bred 1995 Horse of the Year worked seven-eighths of a mile in 1 minute, 23 3/5 seconds at Gulfstream Park under jockey Jerry Bailey and prompted the clocker, Bruce Jakubek, to say: "It was one of the five best works I've ever witnessed."A clocker since 1971, Jakubek compared Cigar's workout to those of Seattle Slew and Spectacular Bid. He said it wasn't the time over a fast track that was so impressive, but the ease with which Cigar covered the ground.
FEATURES
By Beth Pinsker and Beth Pinsker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 1, 1995
When Delroy Lindo gets mad on screen, people stop in their tracks.Maybe it's his voice. When he played a father in Spike Lee's 1994 drama "Crooklyn," one boom from his deep baritone would make his kids cower.Or maybe it's because he's 6-foot-2, and when he leans forward, narrows his eyes and furrows his already creased brow -- as he does often in Lee's adaptation of Richard Price's "Clockers" -- you know he means business.Whatever the aura, it commands attention -- even more as the Oscar buzz builds around his portrayal of Rodney Little, "Clockers' " searing drug lord, who attracts legions of young boys into his service with his fatherly presence but is a cold businessman at heart.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | September 25, 1995
I left Spike Lee's ''Clockers'' thinking every child 12 years old and up should see it. They should see it to get a glimpse of how they will look when they are dead.Mr. Lee, after years of being criticized by many reviewers for not having enough about drugs in his cinematic versions of African-Americans, makes a two-bit seller, or ''clocker'' the central character. He opens the movie with close-up photos taken by police of blown away men and women, presumably killed in drug-related disputes.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even if it were not a thoroughly upsetting two hours, the movie "187" would face rough sledding at the box office because it is not about a dinosaur that hijacks Air Force One.It is a movie for what moviemakers evidently consider a minor market niche -- grown-ups. It is about the foreign country composed of young people, especially young men, in America's wilder urban neighborhoods.The protagonist is Trevor Garfield, a doomed ambassador to that country. He is an African-American high school teacher who, in the movie's first harrowing moments, set in Brooklyn, is repeatedly stabbed in the back by a student wielding a tenpenny nail affixed to a wooden shank.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 9, 2004
Mike Sabo is waiting for his heart to arrive. It is due any minute from Los Angeles. Just before lunch, an assistant hands him a small brown box. Sabo slashes through the packing tape and reverently unwraps the organ. It's a beaut: crimson with purple overtones, made of gelatin, and, on this sweltering day, cool and faintly moist to the touch. Sabo studies the heart with satisfaction. It will play a starring role in the autopsy scene of the HBO television show The Wire, which is scheduled to be shot later this May afternoon.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 22, 1995
IF YOU WANT to see some intelligent discussion of violence in the cities these days, you must go, of course, to a movie.What'd you think -- C-Span?You watch C-Span if you're into, say, speeches by old white guys about hip hop music, which they wouldn't know from the Lindy hop.You go to the movies if you want popcorn, a drink, Junior Mints and cold, hard reality. Yeah, reality -- courtesy of Hollywood, the dream factory, home to Sly Stallone and Ah-nuld, and also Bob Dole's old stomping grounds.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 13, 1995
At least in "Clockers," you always know what time it is: It's midnight in the American City and the American spirit."Clockers," derived from Richard Price's novel via a script by Price and director Spike Lee, is a two-hour reality check that begins with the phoniest trick in the book. It's about the cop who doesn't believe a confessed killer, the starting point for a thousand undistinguished novels and movies.The cop who doesn't buy it, in this case, is one Rocco Klein (the great Harvey Keitel)
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