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NEWS
June 3, 2011
We in the media have met the enemy and found out that he is us. Why do we keep giving Sarah Palin free publicity which is just what she is after? Al Funk, Timonium
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 11, 2014
The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved rules changes in men's lacrosse Wednesday regarding stalling rules and faceoff tactics. Starting in 2015, a visible clock can be used to time the 30-second stalling segment in facilities capable of displaying the clocks. Division I men's lacrosse programs will be required to have the clocks displayed by 2016, and Division II and Division III will be required to have visible clocks by 2017. The panel also supported the NCAA Men's Lacrosse Rules Committee recommendation that two clocks be used, one at each end of the field.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
Here's an update on one problem for Baltimore residents and workers: Baltimore's signature timepiece should get some attention next week. The time displayed by the hands on the southern face of the Bromo Seltzer Tower has been incorrect for several years. Watchdog first reported about the problem, which then affected all the faces, in 2007. Repairs resolved the issue for all the faces except for the one facing south. Clock repair specialists were called in, but nothing helped.
NEWS
By Zahara Johnson | September 9, 2014
I am Zahara Unique-Lynne Johnson, a 23-year-old Morgan State graduate from Camden, N.J. I live part of the time in Baltimore, part of the time in my hometown. But no matter the state, one thing remains the same: my name is always pronounced wrong. The correct pronunciation is Za-hi-ra, but my mom felt frivolous on that 26th day of August, and opted out of spelling it that way. On the first day of school, I can remember teachers butchering it. "Za-hair-ra" or "Za-hor-ra," they'd say with certainty.
NEWS
February 29, 2012
Pastor David Whitney said our rights come from God, not the government, and even if he only said it once in three hours, it requires a reply ("Church-state objections to class," Feb. 24). There is no evidence for God, so any rights attributed to be from him are strictly man-made. Maryland has had four constitutions, but it seems Mr. Whitney thinks nothing has occurred here in the last 250 years. We've gone from a colony ruled by a king claiming a God-given right to rule, to a state in a country that gave blacks and women their freedom and the right to vote.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
The Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association and affiliated Baltimore Catholic League have adopted a 35-second shot clock for the upcoming basketball season. The shot clock will be in place this season for all three of the MIAA conferences and the BCL at the varsity and junior varsity levels. After years of consideration, the addition of the shot clock was approved in April at an annual meeting among MIAA athletic directors after the leagues' coaches made a formal proposal following the conclusion of last season.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 18, 2011
Wilmer A. "Bud" Rehmeyer, a World War II veteran who owned and operated a Baltimore County clock and jewelry repair shop for more than 50 years, died July 10 of heart failure at Chapel Hill Nursing Home in Randallstown. He was 96. The son of a school teacher, who was also a Fuller Brush salesman, and a garment worker was born in Glen Rock, Pa., and later moved with his family to Hampden. He was a City College graduate and worked downtown on Liberty Street for a watch supply company before being drafted into the Army in 1941.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 7, 2010
The hands of time really did stand still Tuesday at approximately 10:35 a.m. But that wasn't until after they twisted and clanged in the wind for more than an hour as workers hoisted two huge metal clock hands up the south face of the Bromo Seltzer Tower on an elaborate pulley system. The four-sided clock soaring nearly 288 feet was built in 1911 and is an indelible part of the Baltimore landscape. Films set in Charm City often include a shot of the brown brick tower that resembles a medieval fortress.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 6, 2006
Not too long ago, some readers made suggestions as to which player ranked as the toughest Oriole. Someone mentioned Brady Anderson's appendicitis in 1996. He had it, then he didn't. Coincidentally, Anderson sent me a text message on Thursday. So I asked him about it. One doctor said his appendix had to be removed. "I couldn't believe it," Anderson said last week. "I had 32 home runs at the time." A different doctor said the condition might go away if he could deal with the pain. After a few days, he came back and hit 18 more home runs, and the Orioles made the playoffs.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
Police departments in Maryland and across the country are weighing the costs and benefits of using unmanned aerial vehicles as aids in the fight against crime. There are still many unanswered questions regarding the new technology's potential impact on citizens' privacy rights as well as safety concerns related to their sharing airspace with civilian and military aircraft. Those issues will all require careful study before drones can be deployed as a widely available law-enforcement tool.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The No. 1 topic in men's college lacrosse this offseason is whether the NCAA will trade its "timer on" rule for a true shot clock. Three men with local ties -- North Carolina coach  Joe Breschi (Loyola High), Delaware coach Bob Shillinglaw (Severna Park) and Mount St. Mary's associate athletic director Mike Hardisky  (Towson State) -- will be part of the nine-member NCAA rules committee that will decide whether to make that change, along with several other possible tweaks.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Almost two years have passed since the NCAA men's lacrosse rules committee announced it would add a 30-second "timer on" countdown to combat stalling and slow play in men's lacrosse. And in the ensuing seasons, it's become clear that the timer is not a magical cure and that further changes need examination. In a column this week for Inside Lacrosse, analyst and Baltimore Sun contributor Quint Kessenich compares the evolution of lacrosse to that of basketball: The shot clock for professional basketball was invented by Syracuse Nationals owner Danny Biasone following the 1954 season in an attempt to speed up the game and prevent teams from stalling.
NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The North and South squads entered Saturday afternoon's Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic tied at 4 wins all-time. Maybe it was only fitting, then, that the ninth edition went to overtime. The South, which trailed by as many as seven goals at Towson University's Johnny Unitas Stadium, didn't lead for a single second of regulation Saturday, but it got a goal from Sykesville's Mikey Wynne just 49 seconds into the extra frame to seal the 17-16 comeback win. "We had a ton of confidence," Wynne, a Notre Dame recruit, said afterward.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Playing a slow-down offense that ran lots of time off the clock, Boston College's women's lacrosse team gave Maryland its toughest game of the season Saturday. In the end, however, the Terps were the ones who milked the clock to victory. The No. 4 Eagles had possession about 22 minutes of the second half, but after Erin Collins gave the No. 2 Terps a 10-9 lead with 4:19 left, Maryland's Beth Glaros (Wilde Lake) won the next draw. The Terps then stalled away the rest of the game at Maryland's Field Hockey & Lacrosse Complex to improve to 13-0 overall and 4-0 in the Atlantic Coast Conference.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A U.S. bankruptcy court is scheduled to decide Tuesday whether to grant more time to developer Patrick Turner, who has tried for 10 years to transform the empty Westport waterfront from grassy marsh to a bustling neighborhood. The decision could end efforts by Turner, who was hailed as a visionary for his 2006 plan to create a $1.4 billion community of offices, townhouses and hotels on about 42 acres along the western corner of the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River, but who has struggled to find the money to push the project forward.
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